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Thread: oil skin coat questions

  1. #1
    Flashaholic Mudd Magnet's Avatar
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    Default oil skin coat questions

    Hey fellas I have a long oilskin drover that is only a month old. It has only been in the rain once on newyears eve and the rest of the time It has just been snowing or cold out. The problem I am having is it has developed a very strong smell and I am not sure what the cause is? It goes away after a while inside but after 10 minutes outside on a nice sunny day it will start to stink lol It is rather weird my mother has a similar coat and it smells just fine although she doesnt wear it very often. I am not sure if it is the cold do I need a lighter weight oil lol I dont think they make such a thing though? any ideas I have always hung the coat up when wet or damp or have left it slung over a chair if it is dry so I don't think it is mold or something. Here is a pic of my coat But mine is black. Made by the outback trading company in canada, Any ideas thanks Guy's


  2. #2
    Flashaholic Dutch's Avatar
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Probably cosmoline...

    If you go to a Home Improvement center (Menard's, Home Depot, etc; not sure what you have in Canada) and check out their canvas tarps, this is probably the same smell your smelling on your coat.

    I have run into a few coats that have this same smell and it's not going to go away. It's inherant to this type of petroleum product. Maybe they got a little carried away whilst brewing up the batch that ended up on your coat.

    I personally have several Filson oiled coats but they use their own brand of scentless paraffin wax.

    Thanks,
    Dutch

  3. #3
    Enlightened
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Yea the only way to get that smell gone is to get it nice and dusty/dirty......then clean it then rewax the coat. I had to do this to 1 of mine Aust. Outback coats....I wore it when I was riding and working w/ horses.......or I have heard the if you use a HOT pressuri washer(not real high psi) but REALLY hot water then let it dry good then rewax it.....I didnt use the Aust Outback wax..... I also had some Filson wax that i used on my coat......Good Luck

  4. #4
    Flashaholic Mudd Magnet's Avatar
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Thanks I'll pick up some of the filsons wax and try that out is it really hard to re oil these coats? any tips for me thanks alot fellas

  5. #5

    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Mudd Magnet
    Hey fellas I have a long oilskin drover that is only a month old.
    Old school. Tried and proven technology.

    Seriously, is there a real advantage to oilskin technology compared to all of the highly water resistant and
    waterproof/breathable fabrics available today?

    However, there are still canvas tents available...

  6. #6
    Unenlightened
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Hi Mudd

    After you paint it on use a hair dryer over the area to draw it into the fabric, otherwise you end up with brushmarks. They go away but this helps.
    Good luck
    Lloyd

  7. #7
    Flashaholic* Echo63's Avatar
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Quote Originally Posted by ringzero
    Old school. Tried and proven technology.

    Seriously, is there a real advantage to oilskin technology compared to all of the highly water resistant and
    waterproof/breathable fabrics available today?

    However, there are still canvas tents available...
    there isnt really any huge advantage of the old skool oilskin coats
    they are big and heavy but they do keep you really dry and cost about 1/3rd of the price of goretex, they also dont wear out too easily, buy a good one once and you shouldnt need to replace it unless you grow out of it, i have 2x drizabones (aussie oilskin coat) and have had them for 2 years, i havent needed to re oil them yet and they are still going strong
    flashlight collector by day
    flashlight user by night

  8. #8
    Flashaholic* Manzerick's Avatar
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    and if you rip..burn or whatever one... you won't feel so bad as if it was $$$$-tex

  9. #9

    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Echo63
    there isnt really any huge advantage of the old skool oilskin coats...i havent needed to re oil them yet and they are still going strong
    Thanks Echo63. That's what I guessed, but since I've never owned one I wasn't sure.

    Have a two-man canvas pup tent I inherited from my Dad that is over 50 years old. Quite heavy but very rugged. Its waterproofing still works. No nylon tent would have stood up to the abuse this tent has taken over the years.

  10. #10

    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Manzerick
    and if you rip..burn or whatever one... you won't feel so bad as if it was $$$$-tex
    Avoid the $$$$-tex products - they aren't worth their brandname inflated prices.

    Look for $$$$-tex equivalent fabrics at lower prices in other brands, like Columbia and RedLedge.

    Besides, $$$$-tex fabrics don't perform as advertised - none of the so-called "waterproof-breathable" fabrics do. If they are really waterproof, then they don't "breathe."

  11. #11
    Flashaholic* John N's Avatar
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Manzerick
    and if you rip..burn or whatever one...
    I've always wondered about the flammability of these coats. Anyone know?

    -john

  12. #12
    Flashaholic Mudd Magnet's Avatar
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    I feel these coats are better then gore-tex or other super faberics because These oil skin coats are strong no need to worry if you rub up against thistles or are in heavy brush. You don't need to be to concernd around a fire embers won't melt a hole in you're new coat as would happen with gore-tex bye bye fancy fabric lol, If you do tear it or otherwise damage the coat you can patch it reproof the damaged section and it will still be waterproof (try that with gore-tex). I have also never had good luck with breathable fabrics or gore-tex keeping me dry it will leak from the start of rain or once the outside is wet it will stop breathing and I'll get drenched from sweat. I have not yet used this coat in warmer weather but from the use I have got it seems to be a great coat I don't sweat in it too much and I have been in one down-poor newyears night and I was still dry as a bone 3 hours later after being out in the rain all night so far I am sold on this technology I'll see how it performs in the spring and summer but I am pretty sure I'll be adding a short version of the coat for everyday wear.

  13. #13
    Flashaholic Mudd Magnet's Avatar
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Quote Originally Posted by John N
    I've always wondered about the flammability of these coats. Anyone know?

    -john
    I have bumped into a few cigs and have hit my coat by my own cigs a few times each time I think ohh sh!t look down see a bit of ash and no real damage been done. I have done the same many times in standard winter coats and I have always ended up with lil holes or burn marks on them.

  14. #14
    Flashaholic* John N's Avatar
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    I was thinking more about open flame. I mean, it is cotton treated with an oil or wax.

    -john

  15. #15
    Flashaholic Mudd Magnet's Avatar
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    hmm good question mayby someon else has the answer? I figured that a burning cig wold be closest to the lil embers a fire gives off. I never really thought of open flames I don't wanna go

  16. #16

    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Mudd Magnet
    You don't need to be to concernd around a fire embers won't melt a hole in you're new coat as would happen with gore-tex bye bye fancy fabric lol, If you do tear it or otherwise damage the coat you can patch it reproof the damaged section and it will still be waterproof (try that with gore-tex).
    Goretex (and similar fabrics) are actually quite easy to patch. I've sucessfully patched holes burned by cigarettes, embers from fires, and small tears caused by sharp objects.

    Waterproof, adhesive-backed, ripstop nylon tape is cheap and readily available in different colors. Just trim a piece to fit, peel off the backing, then slap it over the hole in the Goretex fabric. Completely waterproof patch. The adhesive on ripstop tape works so well that you don't even need to stitch the patch, although you may want to once you are back in civilization. Also works great for tents, groundsheets, packs, etc.

    Ripstop tape has other uses besides patching fabric, and should be carried in any survival kit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mudd Magnet
    I have also never had good luck with breathable fabrics or gore-tex keeping me dry it will leak from the start of rain or once the outside is wet it will stop breathing and I'll get drenched from sweat.
    Breathable fabrics don't really breathe, that is marketing hype. They pass water vapor at low rates that are useless at preventing moisture buildup inside a garment if your body is releasing much water vapor, such as when you are active.

  17. #17
    Flashaholic Mudd Magnet's Avatar
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    RingZero I learn something new everyday I always figured that once you get a hole or tear the coats were pretty much useless. how well do these patches look and hold up in the long run?

  18. #18

    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Mudd Magnet
    RingZero I learn something new everyday I always figured that once you get a hole or tear the coats were pretty much useless. how well do these patches look and hold up in the long run?
    If the color of the coat is close to the color of the ripstop tape, then the patch is hardly noticeable.

    Available in navy blue, forest green, red, yellow, etc.

    Otherwise, it's obviously a patch. If the fabric is single-layer, you can put the patch on the inside to conceal it.

    They seem to hold up quite well. Although ripstop tape is marketed as being for emergency repairs, I have patches on nylon packs and tent flys that are years old that I've never gotten around to stitching.

  19. #19
    Flashaholic*
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Gore Tex (or mountain hardware, i forgot who) even recommends you taking it off and shaking it out if saturated with sweat. I like Gore Tex in paclite form only because its so damn light. Also, no liner= better breathing. The rip stop gore tex outer fabric is much better than the other stuff used. The tighter weave = no seep through from being soaked

  20. #20
    Flashaholic Dutch's Avatar
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Mudd Magnet
    I feel these coats are better then gore-tex or other super faberics because These oil skin coats are strong no need to worry if you rub up against thistles or are in heavy brush. You don't need to be to concernd around a fire embers won't melt a hole in you're new coat as would happen with gore-tex bye bye fancy fabric lol, If you do tear it or otherwise damage the coat you can patch it reproof the damaged section and it will still be waterproof (try that with gore-tex). I have also never had good luck with breathable fabrics or gore-tex keeping me dry it will leak from the start of rain or once the outside is wet it will stop breathing and I'll get drenched from sweat.
    Bingo!

    If you are "working" in the outdoors, nothing will perform as well as natural fibers. Wool, cotton, canvas, and leather...

    Abrasion, fire, heat, and the elements in general will be less likely to negatively impact natural fibers. I have ruined expensive high tech gear in a fraction of the time that my Filson gear (or similar) will not even get phased.

    Believe me, I have a LOT of high tech gear and I love it, and it has it's place, but nothing will stand up to "abuse" like (heavy weight) natural fibers.

    A short afternoon of "making" firewood, hauling it, and sitting around an intense fire in 20F weather will make a brand new expedition parka look like its been to hell and back in less than 2 hours.

    Dutch

  21. #21

    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Dutch
    If you are "working" in the outdoors, nothing will perform as well as natural fibers. Wool, cotton, canvas, and leather...
    Or, you can combine the advantages of both. RedHead, Dickey, Carhartt, etc. now offer cotton duck work coats and pants with GoreTex, or similar, linings for waterproofness.

    Don't own any of this waterproof work clothing myself, but have seen it in catalogs. Fairly expensive, but maybe worthwhile if you do hard work outside in the rain very often.

    I've owned cotton duck work jackets by Dickey and Carhartt, and used them many times while cutting wood and clearing brush. Their heavy cotton duck fabric stands up to abuse quite well.

  22. #22
    Flashaholic* 276's Avatar
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    Default Re: oil skin coat questions

    i have had anoilskin jacket from australia for a year now and i know mine isnt flammable my zippo flame has touch it by accident and after a year or two of use u have to put more oil on it again, when u get the oil u have to heat it up in a pan and re aply with a brush

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