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Thread: UV uses?

  1. #1

    Default UV uses?

    Some one tell me what use they put their UV to, which ones you have etc?
    Invention is the mother of necessity, right?
    Lumenistically
    ED

  2. #2

    Default Re: UV uses?

    i have the inova x1-UV. i use it for everything from testing/activating glow powder to finding cat pee. I don't carry it with me, but it is nice to have it.

  3. #3

    Default Re: UV uses?

    If I ever get to test it I will be using my UV light to flouresce limestone for a 'think outside the box' caving torch.
    It is also useful to charge up glow in th dark stuff.

  4. #4

    Default Re: UV uses?

    UV is used in applications such as curing of polymers or encapsulants, detection of fake currency, in some biomedical equipment, psiorasis treatment dermatology. it is also used during fabrication of dvds and cds, air and water purifiers and a long list of other stuff.

  5. #5
    Flashaholic*
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    I primarily use mine (Minimag with Terralux Cree UV emitter) to verify currency at work, and of course, to charge up the lume paint on my Seiko Orange Monster

    one great use of UV is to verify Postal Money Orders, a legitimate PMO will have the following features;

    flourescent fibers randomly scattered throughout the paper
    the USPS plastic strip (similar to the strip in US paper currency $5 and up) glows a dull red
    the serial number of the MO is printed in UV ink on the back of the MO, and should match the serial number on the front

  6. #6
    Enlightened
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    Use it for identifying bodily fluids full of protein and enzymes such as blood and semen.

  7. #7

    Default Re: UV uses?

    I use my UV lights for tracking the pigment changes in the corals I grow. The UV reactive pigments give me advance warning of the corals lighting direction and flow needs.

    I also use UV lighting in a dark aquarium for attracting just hatched shrimp larva and clownfish and goby fry so I can carefully scoop them out to try(VERY difficult!) to raise them.

    If I use a regular light source, it attracts the fry, but it also attracts about 40 other fish who think the newly hatched babies look like a nice snack.

    Here are some pics taken with UV supplimental lighting. No photoshop or photo editing of any kind.










  8. #8
    *Flashaholic* Size15's's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    In addition to the above,

    Some (all?) Scorpions can be seen very easily under UV light.

    Credit/Debit cards have hidden logos visible under UV
    Passports and driving ID cards often have UV visible markings

  9. #9

    Talking Re: UV uses?

    My son has this vampire hunting GameBoy game.

    http://www.amazon.com/Boktai-2-Solar.../dp/B0001Y73XM

    One of the interesting aspects of the game is that you have to periodically expose a sensor on the game cartridge to UV (sunlight) to keep the vampires at bay. He has discovered my cheapo ebay UV light lets him cheat and play at night.

  10. #10
    Flashaholic* Ty_Bower's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    I use mine to find the kitty whiz, so I can clean it with the carpet machine.
    The only reason a great many American families don’t own an elephant is that they have never been offered an elephant for a dollar down and easy monthly payments.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterScowcroft
    If I ever get to test it I will be using my UV light to flouresce limestone for a 'think outside the box' caving torch.
    EXACTLY what I use my UV light for! Except it's when I'm exploring mineshafts in the Mojave desert. My first time out, my dad and I were like hmmm... I wonder if there's any uranium ore in here? A UV would be perfect to flouresce it, as well as other minerals that aren't easily discerned under visible light.

    I actually made a five-Luxeon flashlight (from scratch) with the Luxes arranged in a pentagon pattern. That hole in the middle has a Cree UV LED and I can toggle between visible and UV for flourescing.

  12. #12
    Flashaholic* Sub_Umbra's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    I've got an old InReTech NUV module (400nm) in a 3D M/\G host for cat pee.

  13. #13
    Flashaholic* Valpo Hawkeye's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    I use mine to find refrigerant leaks. My Inova X5-UV is way easier than the massive UV incan that came with our leak test kit.
    The only easy day was yesterday... now go run!

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    Flashaholic winston's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    I check IDs at a club. A three color image of California's state flag, visible under UV, is on all recent CDLs and IDs. The fakes are getting good, though. In my collection of confiscated fakes are a few where the maker included a UV sensitive image of the flag, albeit a monochromatic one. And when I think of how easy it was to make them when I was a kid....
    -Winston

  15. #15
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    I use it to fluoresce molds in foods especially the rice in the cooker. The mold will shine brighter and whiter before any becomes visible to the naked eye.

  16. #16
    *Flashaholic* Illum's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    money, authentic document verification...mostly for fun

    cat pee supposedly identifiable under 375 nm...mine doesnt

  17. #17
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    Several types of fungal skin infections will fluoresce yellow to yellow-green under 365 nm. It's a great icebreaker for first dates.

  18. #18
    Flashaholic ghostguy6's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    Quote Originally Posted by winston
    I check IDs at a club. A three color image of California's state flag, visible under UV, is on all recent CDLs and IDs. The fakes are getting good, though. In my collection of confiscated fakes are a few where the maker included a UV sensitive image of the flag, albeit a monochromatic one. And when I think of how easy it was to make them when I was a kid....
    -Winston
    There are some great ones floating around Edmonton as well. If it werent for my X1 UV I would have never known they were fakes

  19. #19
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    Cool Re: UV uses?

    I sell a variety of UV indicator lights for pet urine detection.

    The latest ones are 3 Watt Cree UV Leds with 2400 mah lithium ion rechargable batteries.

    They also have glass Minolta aspheric lenses to produce the UV beam.

    Difficult to take beam shot photos.

    LEDite
    Producing 108W UV AC Lights, 9W Handheld UV Lights

  20. #20
    *Flashaholic* Icebreak's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    Lots of stuff. Most recently (nothing new here) I was fishing at a hot spot on the river. For the fun of it I shined my Mag 2C w/ TerraLux Cree UV at one guy's open jig tray. Lit up like a box of lights. Some lures continued to glow because of thier GID.

    Wow.

    Then I lit up the area with an Electrolumens 5W Royal Blue. Many boxes of lit up jigs, and lures.

    Double wow.

    Someone asked me if it cost about $500.00 dollars...that's a first...over estimating the cost.

    I wish I had one of those high power LEDs McGizmo was experimenting with. He had only a few and they were expensive. Sorry I can't remember for sure but I think was some special Nichia LED. I think they were 380 nm or lower.

    LEDite -

    Would you tell us the forward voltage of your Cree UV lights and give a simple discription of the heat sink?

    That Terralux Cree UV I have is way underpowered and I don't think it has much sinking. Still, it's a pretty amazing little torch.
    The oldtimers are forever bound to the universe of flashlights. They reside just above the torch lit stratosphere where the good photons pass by. As these oldtimers locomote on their appointed ways, occasionally an unusual glimmer from below catches their attention.

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  21. #21

    Default Re: UV uses?

    Very interesting! I am curious to know if any or all give off enough visible light to indicate power on in the absence of flourescing objects. I want one to play with.
    Invention is the mother of necessity, right?
    Lumenistically
    ED

  22. #22

    Default Re: UV uses?

    live for physics...
    what UV leds were u using to take those great pictures? wavelength.. flux?

  23. #23

    Default Re: UV uses?

    It would be nice if there was a UV-C LED for water disinfection. All the existing units use fluorescent tubes. Like this one.

  24. #24
    Flashaholic* Sub_Umbra's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    Quote Originally Posted by EDcLED
    Very interesting! I am curious to know if any or all give off enough visible light to indicate power on in the absence of flourescing objects. I want one to play with.
    Yes. As the light's wavelength gets longer (into NUV) more light is given off in the visible spectrum. For some tasks having a visible component can be a PITA but for others it may be handy.

    If you are in an unfamiliar place using a light that gives off no visible light you may trip over something. Imagine trying to use a second flashlight (white) to try to see where you're going while you search for something with your UV light. Clunky. On the other hand NUV (Near UV) lights tend to provide at least some general illumination. It depends on what you're doing. Apples and oranges.

  25. #25

    Default Re: UV uses?

    optolight- The LED source is 378-381nm. To get blue flourecence, I have to get shorterwavelegnths, which is provided by flourecent tubes useing woods glass sleeves with a phosphor combo to yeild light between 340n,-380nm. Also a fairly heavy source of 405-425nm light from actinic T5HO tubes are used for a source to enable the greens and oranges to 'bloom'. Also, a 3.3kk and 6.5kk T5HO were on during those pictures, both tubes heavy in the 670nm area, with a fairy broad spectrum through the green and orange areas.


    LEDlite- I would like to buy one of the aspherical UV LED lights useing 18650cells that you mentioned above. Could you PM me with how I can buy? Thanks.

    -Luke

  26. #26
    Flashaholic* 2xTrinity's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    If you are in an unfamiliar place using a light that gives off no visible light you may trip over something. Imagine trying to use a second flashlight (white) to try to see where you're going while you search for something with your UV light. Clunky. On the other hand NUV (Near UV) lights tend to provide at least some general illumination. It depends on what you're doing. Apples and oranges.
    Reply With Quote
    IMO a more important reason to have a visible component is so I can making sure I'm not hitting someone else's eyes with the beam, or with a specular reflection of the beam. These multi-watt UV point sources can't be healthy to look at, which is why the extent of my non-visible LED collection are little coin cell NUV LEDs for lighting up money. Either that, or I'd need to make sure that I and everyone else around was using some sort of UV-filtering glasses (for very short wave UV, even clear glass filters UV fairly well).

    Now, a UV fluorescent light is not such a big deal in my opinion -- there the light is already diffused, so there's no chance of producing a pinpoint image of short wave invisible light on someone's retina.
    Last edited by 2xTrinity; 04-13-2007 at 02:13 PM.

  27. #27
    *Flashaholic* Patriot's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    Quote Originally Posted by Size15's
    In addition to the above,

    Some (all?) Scorpions can be seen very easily under UV light.

    Credit/Debit cards have hidden logos visible under UV
    Passports and driving ID cards often have UV visible markings
    This is primarily what I use my two UV lights for. It seems to work well on all varieties of scorpion in this region. The bark scorpions glow especially white under UV light. I got stung by one while sleeping a few years ago and I really dislike them a lot.


    P.S. Liveforphysics, wow....very nice pictures!

  28. #28
    Flashaholic* yaesumofo's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    No rock hound should be without a UV source. It is fun to look at government issued ID documents as they all sem to come to life under UV. Credit cards light up too. Money, piss, all kinds of neat stuff.
    I have a few uv sources but my best is a JIL with a cree uv emitter. It lights up the whole world of UV.
    Have fun and DO NOT LOOK AT THE UV WITHOUT EYE PORTECTION!!!
    Yaesumofo
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  29. #29

    Default Re: UV uses?

    Patriot36- Thanks for the Kudos on my pictures!


    As far as adding a visible light source with your UV source, you will really limit the ability to find the objects which flourece. As dark of an enviroment as possible with only shortwave UV light results in the highest contrast between the UV reactive things you are trying to find and surounding enviroment.

    As far as worrying about the UVA from little LED flashlights at distances further than a few feet, you might be startled to know when you simply look down at a sidewalk on a sunny day, you can easily be getting hundreds of time the amount of UVA with some much more concerning UVB mixed in.

    With UVA, you could damage your eyes if you stuck a 3W UV cree an inch from your eye and held if there for a while looking into it, just like you would have eye damage from a 3W white cree held infront of your eye looking into it for a few minutes... I belive you would actually be doing more damage to your retina from a white LED than a UVA led, as the UVA light would have a much higher percentage absorbed by the lens and fluid of the eye before ever reaching the retina.

    Now, UVB on the other hand could becauseing cell mutations on your lens, and likely increaseing your chances of cataracts, and hours later, pain from the lens of your eye being irritated/burned if intensity and duration were long enough.

    Again, these things really come down to common sense. Don't hold any intense source of any sort of emmision of anything in front of your eyeballs, and you will likely have an improved quality of life over those who do.

  30. #30
    Flashaholic* 2xTrinity's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV uses?

    Quote Originally Posted by liveforphysics
    Patriot36- Thanks for the Kudos on my pictures!


    As far as adding a visible light source with your UV source, you will really limit the ability to find the objects which flourece. As dark of an enviroment as possible with only shortwave UV light results in the highest contrast between the UV reactive things you are trying to find and surounding enviroment.

    As far as worrying about the UVA from little LED flashlights at distances further than a few feet, you might be startled to know when you simply look down at a sidewalk on a sunny day, you can easily be getting hundreds of time the amount of UVA with some much more concerning UVB mixed in.
    My concern was more that the LED is closer to a point source -- looking at a blacklight fluorescent tube will cause your eyes to receieve a lot more total UVA, but it won't be nearly as concentrated. This is also why looking at a 5mm coin cell LED putting out maybe 5 lumens is a lot more uncomfortable than looking at 6000 lumen fluorescent fixture at the same distance. In the case of the sunny day, the UV light is coing to be very scattered, and the pupils will be constricted as well. However, you are right about the difference in intensity. A reflection of the sun off of a window etc. is likely worse than the flashlight in terms of UVA intensity. I suppose I'm overly paranoid about this stuff...

    Again, these things really come down to common sense. Don't hold any intense source of any sort of emmision of anything in front of your eyeballs, and you will likely have an improved quality of life over those who do.
    As an aside, have you ever had people who were curious about your lights point the light at their faces and turn them on? I've seen tons of people do that, seems similar to testing if a gun is loaded by looking down the barrel. A guy asked to see one of my Cree lights I carried with me (we were standing outside on a sunny day) he turned it on but the hotspot was barely visible as it was so bright out, so he looked right at the emitter to see if it was on then groaned

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