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Thread: Welcome. Before posting, READ THIS!!!

  1. #1
    Silver Moderator
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    Default Welcome. Before posting, READ THIS!!!

    Many forums have tried to address the safety side of batteries and have ended up with a lot of good information that ends up being buried in some chit chat and off topic discussions. This is our effort to address these safety issues and I want it to be more focused.

    This section will be run like a safety meeting at work. If the reply, or topic is not related to safety, IT WILL BE DELETED, and we will move on.

    I consider this MY safety meeting. If the discussion falls off topic, I, or any of the other moderators, will simply delete your comments to bring things back on topic. You can address any "differences of opinion" to me via PM, or you can have a more open discussion in other sections of CPF.

    The single topic of this section is SAFETY.

    I expect you to provide links to previous safety threads, along with what you have learned from the discussion in those other threads. I will provide a couple of examples to get things rolling.

    We have an excellent safety record at CPF. Let's keep it that way. If you have a close call, let us know so we can avoid a similar situation. I expect this section to become a reference for the various chemistry types used in cells, and what dangers are involved in using them, and how to avoid these dangers.

    Welcome to this section of CPF. Let's dive in and make this an excellent reference, as well as a sounding board for safe behavior when using stored energy. Please share the lessons you have learned and the dangers you have avoided.

    Tom
    Behind every Great man there's always a woman rolling her eyes...

    Most batteries don't die - they are tortured to near death, then murdered...

  2. #2

    Default Re: Welcome. Before posting, READ THIS!!!

    TBH I'm rather wary of Li-Ion technologies and tend to only use manufactured items, the nickel technology batteries seem a little susceptible to outdoor winter temperatures - that only really leaves lead-acid.
    Last edited by Norm; 09-17-2012 at 02:11 PM.

  3. #3
    Flashaholic* mvyrmnd's Avatar
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    Default

    First up: the most confused and most often asked question on CPF.

    How low is too low?

    Most PCB's seem to cut out at 2.8V, which would be under load. Some specs offer 2.5V as a minimum, some people on CPF say as high as 3.2V.

    Can we make a final decision? It'll be slightly different for each chemistry, I realise, but a number that can be offered to newbies as a guide would be great.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Welcome. Before posting, READ THIS!!!

    Here's my safety question. I'm new to this forum and to the world of batteries and flashlights. I've heard talk about flashlights bursting into flames with improper battery use.

    I've recently bought a pack of eneloop 4th gen bk-3mcca 1.2v min 1900 mAh aa and aaa batteries. My understanding is that flashlights that tend to burn in flames are the dual cell flashlights. I have 1 streamlight stylus pro, 1 maglight mini led pro and a thrunite archer 2aa. All of theses lights run 2 aa batteries. If I leave these eneloop batteries stored in the flashlight, what is the probability they will burst into flames? Also, can you mix and match eneloop batteries in a single flashlight? Finally, what if I put 2 eneloops of the same model with different charges in one flashlight, will this cause a fire?

    Do the eneloops generally have issues with going up in flames?

    Thanks.


    Sent from my iPhone using Candlepowerforums

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Welcome. Before posting, READ THIS!!!

    Hello Pmg1977,

    I believe your question was answered in this thread.

    To re-cap, Eneloop cells are NiMh chemistry and in general "events" with that chemistry are rare.

    Tom
    Behind every Great man there's always a woman rolling her eyes...

    Most batteries don't die - they are tortured to near death, then murdered...

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