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Thread: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

  1. #31
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    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    Quote Originally Posted by Tally-ho View Post
    I received mine a few days ago.

    4.266 V measured in open voltage. Led is green when plugged with no battery, that turns red when a battery is inserted.

    Click to enlarge:





    My Trustfire TR-001 looks identical to yours.

    With no cells in , the LEDs are green ... When charge is ended also LEDs are green ... When charging , the LEDs are red.

    The left hand side open circuit voltage is 4.25V and the right hand is 4.24V.

    When the green LEDs come on , both cells are 4.22 volts (open circuit) and after a one hour rest , they settle to 4.21 volts.

    The only slight problem with the charger is the length of time it takes to get from 4.1V to 4.2V ... Seems to take ages.

    It is still a worthwhile charger though ... I use either this or my Soshine SC-S2 ... I had to use both chargers the other day as I was topping up four part-used 18650s ... The Soshine is faster but it really isn't that important as they both end up with the same final voltages.

    The main thing to remember is to take the cells off charge as soon as you realise that the LEDs change colour ... I check every half hour or so to see the LED colour and I also check the cell temperatures ... I also remove the cells occasionally to check the open circuit voltages , though I must admit that I am doing this less often than I originally did.

    I check the cell voltages when on charge and when I see that the voltages are near to 4.22V , I know that they are nearly ready to come off the charger.
    .

  2. #32
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    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    I tested a 14500 with 3.6v and it did 550mah in the first 5mins.

    Does yours do like 1mah in the last 15mins before going green?

    I have here some videos made of the MM will try to put them online later today.

    My WF 139 acts exactly the same as the TR001.
    Artur

  3. #33
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    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    Quote Originally Posted by Art View Post
    I tested a 14500 with 3.6v and it did 550mah in the first 5mins.

    Does yours do like 1mah in the last 15mins before going green?

    I have here some videos made of the MM will try to put them online later today.

    My WF 139 acts exactly the same as the TR001.
    Yes , as the battery voltage goes up in the charge cycle the charge current comes down , the TR-001 is a little extreme in its lower charge current , but it gets the job done .. But that last stage does drag on . [ last 0.1volts ]

    Im going to re-visit this charger when the Soshine arrives , in fact I will re-visit all the chargers I own ...
    Last edited by old4570; 05-03-2010 at 05:12 PM.

  4. #34
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    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    Im charging now a 10440 that was with 3.65v and it started at 0,20 (thats 200mah).

    Seems like the 14500 with same volts alows a lot more charge.

    Havent tested yet 18650 as I cant set up a "bench" to do it lol

    Will upload a video of how Im testing... BRB
    Artur

  5. #35
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    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    Here it is, the first seconds of charge:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VEykVVAJ6mk

    It goes down with the time and then sets a lot of time between 0,01 and 0.

    Will have to do this test with the Cytac.
    Artur

  6. #36

    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    Quote Originally Posted by Art View Post
    Will have to do this test with the Cytac.
    Was the operation the same?

  7. #37

    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    back from the dead

    i just ordered the Trustfire TR-001 with some TrustFire Protected 14500 3.7V 900mAh Rechargeable Lithium,i will be ok to let it run all night ?
    Last edited by nofearek9; 05-22-2012 at 07:37 AM.

  8. #38

    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    up for an answer

  9. #39

    Default

    I wouldn't, the risk isn't worth it. Not sure if current trickled through on mine. You could set up a cheap timer, but its best to keep an eye on it and check the voltage.

  10. #40

    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    ic ,seems those battery need lot of attention.

  11. #41

    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    i've measured my charger and it give 4,12v this will be problem for my batteries? or is it better to push them to 4.2v ?

  12. #42

    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    Hello chaps.
    My first visit here.
    I'm interested in batteries, but right at this minute, I'm hoping someone might help with advice on what I'm seeing with the Trustfire TR-001 charger.

    My batteries are:
    AW IMR 18490 3.7v 1100mAh (4.1WH)

    I noted that the TR001 outputs 4.2v
    Yet a switch on the side allows the selection of 3.6v or 3.0v

    The charger came with no documentation.
    I left the switch at 3.6v as this tallies closest to my battery rating.
    2 new batteries went in, and after around 3hrs the lights changed.

    I metered the batteries on 'battery setting' and plain DC volts
    Both tests produced an output of 4.2v
    This seems to be 0.5v above spec, unless this is a required head, so that under 1.1A load it will deliver 3.7v

    1. Can somebody confirm whether it is overcharging the batteries, or whether this is normal?
    2. I note that one can buy 3.2v batteries of this type - is this the reason for the switch (but why didn't they mark it 3.2v and 3.7v I wonder)?
    3. Also I note that 18650 4.2v batteries are available - in the above respect, would we expect to see 4.7v output from the battery, and could this be achieved by the TR001, which only outputs 4.2v?

    Thanks
    Last edited by MarcoBat; 03-30-2013 at 05:08 PM. Reason: added q3.

  13. #43
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    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    Hello MarcoBat,

    Welcome to CPF.

    The 3.6 volts comes from the "nominal" voltage of Li-Ion cells. It is roughly the voltage of the cell under load when it is 50% discharged. The cell starts out at 4.2 volts and under load is completely discharged at around 3.0 volts.

    To use these cells in some applications it is necessary to reduce the voltage. They will burn up if exposed to 4.2 volts. To mimic a primary cells voltage a circuit is added that drops the voltage by about 0.5 volts. These cells need to be charged to a higher voltage because of the voltage drop in the circuit.

    Caution:

    If you charge a normal Li-Ion cell using the 3.0 volt setting you will end up overcharging the cell. Overcharging is dangerous and will greatly reduce the cycle life of the cell if it doesn't blow up during charging.

    Tom
    Behind every Great man there's always a woman rolling her eyes...

    Most batteries don't die - they are tortured to near death, then murdered...

  14. #44

    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    Thanks for that welcome Silverfox
    This is a very interesting subject, but I've clearly jumped in at the deep end.

    After what you has said, it is all the more bizarre that these chargers are shipped without a manual.

    However, because of this, and the risks you have pointed out.....
    Could you clarify for me the use of the 3.0v switch position?

    If I've understood correctly:

    1. A 3.7v 18650 cell is rated 3.7v because that is its potential difference at 50% charge
    2. A 3.7v cell operates in a range between min 3.0v and max 4.2v
    3. Selecting 3.6v option on the Trustfire TR001, causes the 3.7v cell to be charged to 4.2v.

    You state:
    If you charge a normal Li-Ion cell using the 3.0 volt setting you will end up overcharging the cell.
    From this: if selecting 3.6v causes charging of +0.5v (to 4.2v)
    by selecting 3.0v - does this cause charging of +1.0v (to 4.7v)

    Is this correct?
    And if so, should I be choosing this option If I purchase 18650 4.2v cells?
    I note some companies eg. Ultrafire offer the 18650 in both 3.7v & 4.2v voltages.

    If this is incorrect, when should one use the 3.0v selection option?


  15. #45
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    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    Hello MarcoBat,

    I think you have it correct. Using the 3.6 volt option you end up charging a cell to 4.2 volts. Using the 3.0 volt option the cell is charged to 4.7 volts but the diode that is used to drop the voltage limits the voltage to the cell to 4.2 volts. If you charge a 3.0 volt cell on the 4.2 volt setting it will under charge the cell. However if the other way around you are setting yourself up for problems.

    A normal Li-Ion cell can be called by its nominal voltage (3.7 volts) or by its maximum charged voltrage (4.2 volts). A cell that has been altered to a lower voltage (3.0 volts) should be clearly marked and charging that cell would require the 3.0 volt setting.

    Tom
    Behind every Great man there's always a woman rolling her eyes...

    Most batteries don't die - they are tortured to near death, then murdered...

  16. #46

    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    Thanks for confirming that.
    I guess therefore that the real question resolves down to the accuracy of the manufacturers claims.

    By that I mean:

    In the 18650 range, where a manufacturer states their cell is 4.2v (as does occur), can we believe that the 4.2v quoted is the nominal voltage.
    Ie. It can be safely charged to 4.7v, meaning that under load it delivers 4.2v.

    Eg. http://www.priceangels.com/2-Pcs-Ult...t-s413798.html

    I've read so many disparaging reports on this company that I'm loathe to take their claims at face value.
    The 4.2v is actually important to me, as this modifies the wattage consumed by a given coil.

    This will ultimately be discussed on a thread I have started here:

    http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/...02#post4175102

    What are your thoughts on availability of cells greater than 3.7v in the 18650 format?

  17. #47
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    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    Hello MarcoBat,

    I don't believe there are any Li-Ion cells that can take a 4.7 volt charge. When the say 4.2 volts, that is the maximum voltage for that cell. Its nominal voltage is 3.7 volts, and that is the voltage under "normal" load.

    Some manufacturers have increased the nominal voltage from 3.7 volts to 3.75 volts. However, when reviewing the data sheet it seems that the higher mid point voltage is achieved by subjecting the cell to a lower current draw.

    Take a look at some discharge graphs for Li-Ion cells. All of this will fall into place when you review the graphs. In this case a picture is worth many words.

    You can also see how the mid point voltage varies under various loads.

    Tom
    Behind every Great man there's always a woman rolling her eyes...

    Most batteries don't die - they are tortured to near death, then murdered...

  18. #48

    Default Re: Trustfire TR-001 Charger

    Yes, that's what I suspected.
    The ultrafire 4.2v is probably barely different than their 3.7v other than the printing.
    It does appear to be the case that a manufacturer can create create confusion with their terminology.
    Similarly with the 4200mAh claim.

    Others on this site have stated
    http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/...-18650-charger
    that nothing above 3400mAh is produced.

    Check out this graph:
    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-V36TSNWZLJ...re+4200mAh.gif

    (A set of international standards would be nice.)

    However, concentrating on the question of the availability of a cell chargeable to 4.7v.
    At the moment, no such cell exists.

    Therefore, for the 18650 range, the 3.0v select option on the Trustfire-T001 - should never be selected.

    Hmmmmmm!
    How on earth could I have known that, without the level of research that I have just gone to.
    Obviously there must be a battery for which this option is required - only we aren't informed.
    Wierd!

    Thanks for all the help

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