4 Sevens             
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Sunwayman M60R (SST-50, 2x-4x-6x CR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMSHOTS and more!

  1. #1

    Wink2 Sunwayman M60R (SST-50, 2x-4x-6x CR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMSHOTS and more!

    Warning: even more pic heavy than as usual.



    Specifications:
    • LED: Luminus SST-50 LED
    • Three levels of constant output, one strobe mode: 800 Lumens (1hrs), 180 Lumens (4 hrs), 13 Lumens (28 hrs), Strobe mode: 800 Lumens,
    • Digital Sensor Magnetic Control system, a slight twist of the Rotator Ring selects the different modes
    • Constant current circuit, constant output
    • Effective range of 300 meters
    • Using 6 x CR123A batteries (can also run on 2 or 4 x CR123A batteries as well... same output but shorter runtime)
    • Working voltage: 4.5~9V
    • Orange Peel Reflector creates a perfect beam pattern
    • Dimension: 161.8 mm (length) x 57 mm (head diameter) x 40 mm (body diameter)
    • Weight: 240g (excluding battery)
    • Aerospace-grade aluminum alloy
    • Military Specification Type III Hard-Anodizing
    • Waterproof to IPX-8 standards
    • Ultra-clear toughened glass lens resists scratches and impact
    • Able to tail stand for use in "candle mode"
    • Accessories: lanyard, O-ring
    • Estimated MSRP ~$240

    The Sunwayman M60R is an interesting high-output light – featuring the Luminus SST-50 emitter, it is able to run on 2x, 4x, or 6x CR123A or RCR batteries.





    The light comes in a solid cardboard box with cushioned packing foam. Included inside the package are the light, wrist strap/lanyard, manual, warranty card, promotional insert, and extra o-rings. Note that no holster is included, unfortunately.


    From left to right: Energizer CR123A, Sunwayman M60R, M40A, M40C, Eagletac M3C4 3xR5 XP-G, M3C4 SST-50 Deep throw

    M60R: Weight: 262.0g (no battery), Width (bezel) 57.2mm, Length: 163mm
    M40A: Weight: 247.0g (no battery), Width (bezel) 57.0mm, Length: 145mm
    M40C: Weight: 258.5g (no battery), Width (bezel) 57.1mm, Length 156mm

    Overall dimensions are certainly consistent with other Sunwayman lights.




    Styling is extremely similar to M40A – it basically just looks like a taller version of it.

    Knurling is reasonably aggressive compared to most made-in-China lights. The natural finish anodizing remains top-notch – one of the best I’ve seen. No obvious blemishes or chips on mine.

    The control ring feels identical to M40A (which is slightly firmer than the original M40C). As before, there are no identifying labels on the control ring.

    Screw threads are still high quality square-cut, anodized for head lock-out. There are also a few more threads than the original M40C.

    As with the M40A, there is no clicky switch. On/off and mode switching is now controlled entirely by the control ring in the head. The M60R can also tailstand.






    Like the M40A, note the high quality battery carrier. Unlike a number of competitors, the carrier is all metal. It is also reversible - you can insert it either orientation into the light handle. So as long as you put the batteries in correctly (well labelled inside the carrier), there’s no chance of accidentally reversing polarity. This is a creative design, and something I hope other makers pick-up.

    The cells are arranged as two in series, for each of the three channels of the carrier (the three channels are in parallel). This is why you can run 2x, 4x, or 6x configurations of dual cells. Just fill up any number of the three channels, as you prefer (either all RCR or all CR123A – don’t mix the two).

    But note that you cannot run 1x, 2x or 3x of a single cell (e.g. 3.7V Li-ion, like an 18650) – the voltage range requires at least 4.5V. For that matter, the battery handle is too narrow for 18650 or 17670 – you are limited to only CR123A or RCR.




    The M60R features the Luminus SST-50 emitter, with a medium textured orange peel (MOP) deep reflector. I am glad to see Sunwayman has made the switch to these newer emitters.

    Which brings us to the requisite white wall hunting . All lights are on Hi on their respective max Li-ion configuration (6xCR123A for the M60R), about ~0.75 meter from a white wall (with the camera ~1.25 meters back from the wall). Automatic white balance on the camera, to minimize tint differences.

    Note:I accidentally mislabeled the M60R images as M60C in the pics below – sorry. :shhh:













    The M60R has a smooth beam profile, as expected for a textured reflector. Consistent with the relatively shallow reflector, throw is not as great as some of the competing products.

    I've recently updated my 100-Yard Outdoor Beamshot Round-up, including the M60R. Check out that round-up thread for more details on the testing method, plus higher quality JPEG images of all lights. For now, here is an animated GIF of some relevant SST-50 comparisons:




    Again, sorry for the mislabeling – that should read M60R for the Sunwayman light.

    User Interface

    On/off and mode switching is controlled entirely by the magnetic control ring in the head (i.e. there is no clicky on-off switch). As such, there needs to be a “standby” mode on the ring (i.e. where no light is produced, but a standby current is being drawn so the electronic circuit knows when you are switching modes).

    The five control ring levels on the M60R are Standy - Lo – Med – Hi – Strobe, arranged clockwise if you have the light in hand pointed away from you. Like the M40C, the total traverse of the ring is ~1/2 the circumference of the light, and you can switch back and forth with ease one-handed. As mentioned previously, the detents feel more pronounced than my original M40C, increasing your confidence of not accidentally switching modes.

    Thanks to the anodized threads, you can lock-out the light by a simple quarter-turn loosening of the head. This is very useful if storing the light for a period of time, or to prevent accidental activation. There are plenty of screw threads, so no risk of the head falling off by this slight loosening.

    Standby/Parasitic Current

    The parasitic drain of standby modes is always a concern, so I measured it on my sample: 71.5uA for CR123A, 73.7uA for RCR. Given the 2xSeries/3xParallel nature of the battery carrier, the current draw is the same whether you have 2x, 4x, or 6x cells - all that changes is how long it would take to drain those cells.

    So, those currents would translate into the following times to completely drain fully charged cells (assuming 1500mAh for CR123A, 750mAh for RCR):

    2xCR123A: 2.4 years
    4xCR123A: 4.8 years
    6xCR123A: 7.2 years

    2xRCR: 1.2 years
    4xRCR: 2.3 years
    6xRCR: 3.5 years

    As you can see, not really a problem, but good to have the easy head lock-out anyway.

    No PWM

    I could detect no signs of PWM flicker by eye or with my sound-card oscilloscope setup. I believe the M60R is current-controlled on Lo/Med.

    Strobe



    Strobe was measured at a fairly high “tactical” 12.3 Hz.

    Testing Method:

    All my output numbers are relative for my home-made light box setup, a la Quickbeam's flashlightreviews.com method. You can directly compare all my relative output values from different reviews - i.e. an output value of "10" in one graph is the same as "10" in another. All runtimes are done under a cooling fan, except for any extended run Lo/Min modes (i.e. >12 hours) which are done without cooling.

    I have recently devised a method for converting my lightbox relative output values (ROV) to estimated Lumens. See my How to convert Selfbuilt's Lighbox values to Lumens thread for more info.

    Throw/Output Summary Chart:

    Effective November 2010, I have revised my summary tables to match with the current ANSI FL-1 standard for flashlight testing. Please see http://www.sliderule.ca/FL1.htm for a description of the terms used in these tables.



    Throw is toward the low end of this class of light, but very close to the MC-E-based M40A and M40C. Overall output is very similar to the MC-E-based M40C, and most other SST-50 lights in my collection. While definitely a significant amount of light, the reported 800 lumen spec seems optimistic.

    See my runtimes below for info on the relative output levels.

    Output/Runtime Comparison:

    Note: Effective January 2010, all CR123A runtimes are now performed on Titanium Innovations batteries. You can compare the performance of these CR123A cells relative to the Duracell/Surefire cells used in my earlier reviews here. These new light results are marked by an "*" in the graph legend

    To keep this simple, I've used only 4xRCR for all my runtimes below. You can easily extrapolate up to 6x or down to 2x (i.e. outputs stay the same, just runtime changes). I didn't have 6 well-matched RCR cells on hand for testing.







    Output/runtime efficiency on RCR is very good in Lo/Med modes, and OK at the Hi mode.

    On CR123A, I've only tested Hi mode performance, which was again merely OK. The M60R is not as tightly regulated on Hi on 4xCR123A or 6xCR123A as a number of other lights.

    Potential Issues

    The light needs >4.5V per channel, so 18650 cannot be used (the battery handle/carrier is not wide enough to allow it anyway). This is unfortunate, as 3x18650 would be the ideal way to run light, in terms of battery capacity.

    The light seemed to get rather warm on Hi with 4xRCR. I recommend you avoid running the light on Hi with RCR on anything but the full 6x compliment of cells.

    There is a parasitic standby current, although this is minimal in my testing. The light can also be easily and reliably locked-out with a simple twist of the head if you are concerned.

    Preliminary Observations

    The M60R is certainly another solid offering from Sunwayman. The build is remarkably similar to M40A, but with the Luminus SST-50 emitter and support for up to 6x CR123A/RCR.

    Like the other early releases, build quality and attention to detail are excellent. The anodizing is top notch, and I really like the battery carrier’s solid metal construction and reversible polarity design (i.e. fits in either way). Like the M40A, this is the best carrier design I’ve seen so far.

    The flexibility of multiple 2x battery configurations is good, but I personally miss the option for 1x, 2x, or 3x single Li-ion (e.g. 18650). Neither the circuit design nor the physical dimensions of the carrier/handle allow this. Personally, I worry the more batteries I put into a light (e.g. possibility for reverse charging), but at least the M60R is no more than 2 in series at any time. Still, the lower capacity of RCRs is disappointing as the only rechargeable option.

    The beam of the M60R is flawless, but it also the least throwy of my samples in this class. I personally like this sort of flood light, but I know some prefer greater throw.

    The magnetic control ring is similar to the M40A, and has one of the better “feels”, at least among the various models I’ve handled. The standby current is negligible, and the light is easily locked-out by a simple head twist. Spacing of output levels is good IMO.

    As with the M40A/C, the regulation and output/runtime profiles are very good, especially on the Lo/Med modes. Note that Hi mode is only semi-regulated on CR123A, and runtime performance is not as great as some other lights. I should note as well that the max lumen output spec (i.e. 800 lumens) seems a bit high. I suspect this light something closer to the industry-standard ~600 lumens for an SST-50 light.

    As with the other Sunwayman offerings, this is a well made light that shows considerable design and manufacturing expertise. Despite some limitations (i.e. lack 18650 support), I think this light fits in well for this class. The flexibility of 2x, 4x and 6x battery configurations is particularly novel.

    ----

    M60R provided by Sunwayman and Batteryjunction.com for review.
    Last edited by selfbuilt; 01-17-2012 at 10:11 AM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Sunwayman M60R (SST-50, 2x-4x-6x CR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMSHOTS and more

    Written by Patriot on 12-28-2010 11:05 AM GMT

    Great work! I really like the all metal carrier. A bit surprising that they went 6x123 vs. 3x18650. A huge difference in stored energy between the two formulas but I guess the body is more narrow as well. Thanks Selfbuilt
    Written by selfbuilt on 12-29-2010 09:28 AM GMT

    Correct - both the body handle and the carrier are too narrow to accept 18650. Sunwayman informs me that are looking at doing multi-18650 lights in the future. Correct - both the body handle and the carrier are too narrow to accept 18650. Sunwayman informs me that are looking at doing multi-18650 lights in the future.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Sunwayman M60R (SST-50, 2x-4x-6x CR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMSHOTS and more

    Written by JA(me)S on 12-29-2010 10:22 AM GMT

    Quote Originally Posted by selfbuilt
    Correct - both the body handle and the carrier are too narrow to accept 18650. Sunwayman informs me that are looking at doing multi-18650 lights in the future.
    First off, another incredible review - I hope I never take your efforts for granted! Secondly, multi-18650 lights from Sunwayman will be on my radar - excellent news! I think there may have been more interest in this light had it accepted 3x18650. It seems they are trying to fill a niche that didn't exist - or I didn't know about... First off, another incredible review - I hope I never take your efforts for granted! Secondly, multi-18650 lights from Sunwayman will be on my radar - excellent news! I think there may have been more interest in this light had it accepted 3x18650. It seems they are trying to fill a niche that didn't exist - or I didn't know about...

    - Jas.
    Written by MichaelW on 12-29-2010 12:38 PM GMT

    I want to like this, but the pricing is outrageous and the lack of levels is disappointing. I'd expect 5/6 six levels (depending if those are OTF lumens or not)
    Written by Toughguy on 12-31-2010 01:15 AM GMT

    Thank you very much.

    I have been waitting for reviews of this light.

    Very helpful.
    Written by okwchin on 01-09-2011 03:04 AM GMT

    Great Review :

    The beam is definitely very smooth, with a broad and usable flood, and a very smooth and largish hotspot which is great for medium distances.

    A have however noticed a pre-flash which happens every now and again. Im not sure what causes it yet, but it does happen probably once every 100 operations or so. Usually I notice it as a high mode, or even strobe that occurs as the magnetic ring is passing between off and low.

    It didn't seem very clear in your review, but it is Not possible to use protected 16340s in the M60R battery carrier. 2 protection circuits add too much in length for the cells to fit. There is also no low voltage cutoff/warning as this torch is designed to run of CR123 Primaries.

    With a little bit of work, I've managed to fit 2x18650s into my M60R. I use the Trustfire protected 2400mA Black/red batteries, and pulled 2200 cells. Its a very close fit, but it does work, and allows me to use protected rechargeables in the torch. Although 3 cells will not fit, I consider the use of 2x 18650s as a rounded battery tube version of the M40C which has the flattened battery tube.

    I really do enjoy my M60R, Its a very versatile torch with great looks, and a top notch finish, with good electrical design.

    I would like to see what SUNWAYMAN has to offer in the future.

    If I had to dream up an ideal torch, Id ask for a variable output version of this torch that takes all the battery tubes from their torches (3xCR123, 6xCR123, 4xAA, (and) 2x18650)).
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Sunwayman M60R (SST-50, 2x-4x-6x CR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMSHOTS and more

    Written by selfbuilt on 01-10-2011 08:38 AM GMT

    Quote Originally Posted by okwchin
    A have however noticed a pre-flash which happens every now and again. Im not sure what causes it yet, but it does happen probably once every 100 operations or so. Usually I notice it as a high mode, or even strobe that occurs as the magnetic ring is passing between off and low.
    I didn't notice in this case, but it is not uncommon to find it on these sorts of lights. I have noted in my other Sunwayman reviews (as well as some EagleTac, NiteCore and Jetbeam lights that use the same sort of magnetic control ring). You usually see it switching out of standby to Lo, or from off to Lo/Med (depends on the specific lights and control interface). I didn't notice in this case, but it is not uncommon to find it on these sorts of lights. I have noted in my other Sunwayman reviews (as well as some EagleTac, NiteCore and Jetbeam lights that use the same sort of magnetic control ring). You usually see it switching out of standby to Lo, or from off to Lo/Med (depends on the specific lights and control interface).



    It didn't seem very clear in your review, but it is Not possible to use protected 16340s in the M60R battery carrier. 2 protection circuits add too much in length for the cells to fit. There is also no low voltage cutoff/warning as this torch is designed to run of CR123 Primaries.
    No, I was able to get them to fit - see my runtimes on protected AW RCRs. The cells are little snug, though. And I agree - unprotected cells should not be used in the light. No, I was able to get them to fit - see my runtimes on protected AW RCRs. The cells are little snug, though. And I agree - unprotected cells should not be used in the light.



    With a little bit of work, I've managed to fit 2x18650s into my M60R. I use the Trustfire protected 2400mA Black/red batteries, and pulled 2200 cells. Its a very close fit, but it does work, and allows me to use protected rechargeables in the torch. Although 3 cells will not fit, I consider the use of 2x 18650s as a rounded battery tube version of the M40C which has the flattened battery tube.
    Interesting, I was not able to squeeze my AW protected 18650s in there. Also interesting to hear it lights it, since that setup is below the minimum voltage range (i.e needs ~4.5 per channel). Any idea of if max output is reduced? You might also loose circuit regulation, depending on how it handles 1x3.7V Li-ion per channel. Interesting, I was not able to squeeze my AW protected 18650s in there. Also interesting to hear it lights it, since that setup is below the minimum voltage range (i.e needs ~4.5 per channel). Any idea of if max output is reduced? You might also loose circuit regulation, depending on how it handles 1x3.7V Li-ion per channel.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Sunwayman M60R (SST-50, 2x-4x-6x CR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMSHOTS and more

    Written by okwchin on 01-12-2011 03:31 AM GMT

    Your AW RCRs must be exactly 34mm or shorter!. My Trustfires are about 35.4mm long. Had another go with my cells, and theres No chance the cells will fit. Its too long by at least 1.9-2.1mm


    Interesting, I was not able to squeeze my AW protected 18650s in there. Also interesting to hear it lights it, since that setup is below the minimum voltage range (i.e needs ~4.5 per channel). Any idea of if max output is reduced? You might also loose circuit regulation, depending on how it handles 1x3.7V Li-ion per channel.
    Im not using the existing battery carrier. The size of the 18650 only allows 2 cells to JUST fit into the tube. So i made my own carrier that gives me the same voltage, I have the 2 cells wired in series, so its still 7.4v (8.4V). Power output is the same, however the runtimes would theoretically be improved Im not using the existing battery carrier. The size of the 18650 only allows 2 cells to JUST fit into the tube. So i made my own carrier that gives me the same voltage, I have the 2 cells wired in series, so its still 7.4v (8.4V). Power output is the same, however the runtimes would theoretically be improved . My Trustfire 16340s give me 500-550mA capacity, while my Trustfire 18650s give me 2000-2200mA. So a quick calculation assuming the cells would fit, mean the 16340s give a total of 1500-1650mA at 7.4V, while the 18650s give 2000-2200mA at 7.4V. Better RCRs, or even 1500mA CR123s at 3.2V would still give more power.

    Sloppy work! Was too excited about getting it to work, so I didnt etch any of the PCBs Just got out the dremel for instant satisfaction . I did however spend time on the lathe to get the spacers to within 0.05mm of each other! shrug:











    And another extract from my other posts about this torch, heres the "tailcap" measurements off my PSU for the M60R head on high

    10.0v 1.42A

    9.0v 1.60A

    8.0v 1.83A

    7.0v 2.10A

    6.0v 2.55A

    5.5v 2.80A

    below 5.5v it tapers off

    below 4.0v it turns off (more like, it dims to zero).

    With this in mind, the torch will also run off 4x NiMH cells, however it will only be able to maintain regulation on low and medium, with only a small increase in output by going to high mode, however this cannot be sustained without the voltage sag.

    Written by selfbuilt on 01-12-2011 08:54 PM GMT

    Quote Originally Posted by okwchin
    Im not using the existing battery carrier. The size of the 18650 only allows 2 cells to JUST fit into the tube. So i made my own carrier that gives me the same voltage, I have the 2 cells wired in series, so its still 7.4v (8.4V).
    Ah, I see - quite an ingenious solution. Ah, I see - quite an ingenious solution.

    I agree that 2x18650 in series would be the "sweet spot" for this light. Glad you were able to make it work - you might find an after-market demand for your carrier-making skills!
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Sunwayman M60R (SST-50, 2x-4x-6x CR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMSHOTS and more

    Written by VF1Jskull1 on 01-12-2011 10:43 PM GMT

    Quote Originally Posted by okwchin
    Your AW RCRs must be exactly 34mm or shorter!. My Trustfires are about 35.4mm long. Had another go with my cells, and theres No chance the cells will fit. Its too long by at least 1.9-2.1mm

    Im not using the existing battery carrier. The size of the 18650 only allows 2 cells to JUST fit into the tube. So i made my own carrier that gives me the same voltage, I have the 2 cells wired in series, so its still 7.4v (8.4V). Power output is the same, however the runtimes would theoretically be improved . My Trustfire 16340s give me 500-550mA capacity, while my Trustfire 18650s give me 2000-2200mA. So a quick calculation assuming the cells would fit, mean the 16340s give a total of 1500-1650mA at 7.4V, while the 18650s give 2000-2200mA at 7.4V. Better RCRs, or even 1500mA CR123s at 3.2V would still give more power.

    Sloppy work! Was too excited about getting it to work, so I didnt etch any of the PCBs Just got out the dremel for instant satisfaction . I did however spend time on the lathe to get the spacers to within 0.05mm of each other! shrug:











    And another extract from my other posts about this torch, heres the "tailcap" measurements off my PSU for the M60R head on high

    10.0v 1.42A

    9.0v 1.60A

    8.0v 1.83A

    7.0v 2.10A

    6.0v 2.55A

    5.5v 2.80A

    below 5.5v it tapers off

    below 4.0v it turns off (more like, it dims to zero).

    With this in mind, the torch will also run off 4x NiMH cells, however it will only be able to maintain regulation on low and medium, with only a small increase in output by going to high mode, however this cannot be sustained without the voltage sag.

    I like that Neofab Legion II in the background. Any chance you got to compare this to the Legion? I like that Neofab Legion II in the background. Any chance you got to compare this to the Legion?
    Written by field on 01-13-2011 01:30 AM GMT

    Thank you very much!!

    Very professional evaluation!!
    Written by okwchin on 01-17-2011 02:27 AM GMT

    Quote Originally Posted by selfbuilt
    Ah, I see - quite an ingenious solution.

    I agree that 2x18650 in series would be the "sweet spot" for this light. Glad you were able to make it work - you might find an after-market demand for your carrier-making skills!
    Its a possibility, however everything is manual labour still, so it usually takes too long to make each one! Its a possibility, however everything is manual labour still, so it usually takes too long to make each one!

    Quickly, comparing the Legion to the M60R, here are some points

    M60R

    + Build quality is just TOP notch!!

    + Square threads are just AWESOME!

    + Magnetic ring is easy enough to figure out

    + strobe is available on the high end of the ring (not the low end)

    + Beam is nice and smooth, with a wide spot, however enough raw output to give Some distance

    + Output level spacing is good

    + Looks cool enough

    + Knurled body tube is really nice to hold, grippy enough, yet not overly contoured and well balanced. Does feel nice

    - Not an absolute thrower (if your after that)

    - Could do with a little more cooling.. (but its fine)

    - Could do with more levels inbetween, and a lower one.

    - tint is very blue, the spill is especially blue (this is a 'feature' of the SST-50)

    Legion II SST-50

    + More throw (not a thrower too, but more throw, probably 100m more in distance easily)

    + momentary access to high

    + Battery Meter!!! ( )

    + 18650x3

    + UI is unique, nice, but...

    + Beam is generally smooth with gradual transition from hotspot all the way to edge of beam (i.e. corona is size of beam). Also, corona in SST-50 is more yellow, so the graduated corona makes the beam more balanced in tint.

    - Beam isnt as smooth as the M60R, as in the corona has slightly visible flower pattern (from square die) however it is as said, Overall very balanced and 'smoothed out', but not totally smooth as in clean for white walling. Practically its not a problem.

    - Build is not as high, machining isnt as perfect, threads are not smooth.

    - UI is also a little different - need to hold ring to one side for on/off

    - Beam has slight doughnut on SMO

    - small spill, (but very bright spill) - so tunnel vision effect

    - Low is not low enough. (140 lumens ish !)

    - Sourcing one is tricky...
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Sunwayman M60R (SST-50, 2x-4x-6x CR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMSHOTS and more

    The main review post has been updated with the final review text.

    The thread discussions for the last few months have been fully restored from the search engine cache data (thank you tandem!).

    Please carry on!
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Sunwayman M60R (SST-50, 2x-4x-6x CR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMSHOTS and more

    Selfbuilt:

    Thank you for the review.

    The manufacturer does NOT recommended running on MAX for over 10 minutes.

    What do you think of that suggestion---people who buy high lumen lights want to shine it in MAX, but 10 minutes seems very short.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Sunwayman M60R (SST-50, 2x-4x-6x CR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMSHOTS and more

    Quote Originally Posted by lovemylexicon View Post
    The manufacturer does NOT recommended running on MAX for over 10 minutes.
    What do you think of that suggestion---people who buy high lumen lights want to shine it in MAX, but 10 minutes seems very short.
    I think that is a very reasonable suggestion. And it's one a number of manufacturers make, in regards to multi-cell CR123A configurations.

    Note that you may be perfectly safe running them longer - I didn't experience any problems in my runtime testing of this model. But as a general rule, I agree with the approach to limit the max runtime (due to the high CR123A battery temperature on sustained max).
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •