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Thread: The Nightsword project

  1. #91
    Flashaholic Machete God's Avatar
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    Default Re: Superlights shoot-out 2011: The Short Arcs

    I just discovered and read through the thread, and the question that has been hanging at the back of my mind from page one is, "Why is this awesome project "hidden" in a shoot-out thread?"

  2. #92
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    Default The Nightsword project

    Done!

    The original Short Arc shoot-out thread is here, and I've put in a link there to this thread.
    Resistance is futile...

  3. #93

    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    You guys are amazing. I won't pretend to be able to understand the graphs, the math, or the science behind building such powerful lights, but I sure love reading your posts and looking at the results. My hat is off to you.

    mark

  4. #94
    Flashaholic* get-lit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    Good question Machete God. There is an original Nightsword thread from a few years ago, but I'm at a different phase of the project than back then. I haven't started a thread because I didn't intend to get back into the discussions while working on this. That's because I didn't want to string people along. I have four children and I work a lot, so it's been difficult to move this along in a timely manner. It also costs a lot, so I have to move along according to what I can afford to put into it.

    ma-sha's thread motivated me to post a beamshot and then I ended up discussing the project again. I'm glad I did, because I decided to go back to the roots of no compromise for candlepower. It's been difficult for me to sacrifice things like a nice flood pattern when defocusing the beam, but I got unanimous feedback.
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    So what design differences are there to go from the more useful beam to ultimate candlepower? Would it have to be a totally different reflector plus a focus adjustment? Is it possible for you to have 2 different reflectors made once you recoup your investment? With the goal that you could use the same light, lamp, etc. and simply switch the reflector and adjust focus for a more useful beam. Is there a lot more to it than this or am I close? I do remember from Ra's MegaBlaster thread that the reflector he had custom made was well over $1000!

  6. #96
    Flashaholic* get-lit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    Great questions. First off, with this much output, the reflector does cost the big bucks because it has to be Rhodium plated Nickel to endure the shear output. Aluminum just can't cut it. And it has to be top grade precision. Considering having a diamond-turned mandrel machined for the most precise reflector, which would cost a one-time $5000. Also they have to have the latest "Bright" Rhodium coating. Finally, they have to have a new and unique "Enhancement" coating to increase reflectance of the Bright Rhodium from around 70% to around 90% and to boost endurance.

    It would be very nice to make a universally compatible system, in which different reflector housings are interchangeable with the electronics/air filter housing and interchangeable lamps and power supplies. I have designed the lamp mount to be compatible with different lamps, and I have designed the electronics housing to be compatible with different power supplies. I'm assembling the power supplies as single-piece encapsulated "modules" to bolt into the housing. However, high-power lamps have larger power supplies and separate ignitor, and low-power lamps would use the same housing so it wouldn't be the most efficient use of space for the low-power lamps. The high-power power supplies are very space efficient, so it's not that big of a difference. Also, the fan and ducting could be much smaller for low-power lamps, so again, designing a universal system does not make for the most efficient use of space for low powered lamps. The fan controller would reduce fan power for low power lamps. That will be a component that I will embed in the power supply "module".

    I've considered many methods to utilize interchangeable reflectors. However, if I want this to be as strong and light as possible, the reflector housing and electronics housing have to be a single-piece structure, so that the layup fibers extend along the length of the entire housing. Also with a single piece housing, the handle can greatly increase strength and rigidity by running fibers along the length of it's wall structure from the reflector housing to the rear of the electronics housing, rather than bolting to only the electronics housing and supporting nothing at all. You can see this is all included in the drawings on post #50.

    I've considered this quite a bit and I prefer to not stray from this design. Again, it maximizes strength and rigidity with less weight. That's important for something this size to be more portable. I'd rather make a separate entire mold for a different reflector. Maybe call it the Xiphos since it would be a smaller, more versatile Nightsword.

    The specific reason that the beam spread becomes much less useful in flood mode when optimizing for candlepower, is that I'd have to utilize a reflector with maximized source-to-reflector distance for every angle from the source. For this I'm going back to a super long focal-length reflector, which is the traditional searchlight configuration. Reflection distance is maximized behind the source. I will also be using a lamp-mounted retro-reflector to direct the light in front of the source to the rear. It eliminates spill light from killing your eyes and directs it to be used on target.

    Medium focal-length reflectors on the other hand, such as with the Spectrolab SX-16, have a nice mix of short source-to-reflection distances for every angle from the source, with long distances in front of the source and short distances behind the source. This creates a central beam from the longer front distances, with slight spill from the shorter rear distances. In flood mode, the light from the longer front distances distinctly diverge, while the "spill" light from the shorter rear distances better fills in the center hole than if all distances were maximize as with a long focal length reflector. The problem with the SX-16 is that it's reflector vertex hole is much too big to take advantage of the usefulness of a medium focal length reflector in flood mode, and as a result it still produces a more pronounced center hole than it could have.

    Then there's short focal-length reflectors, including the Maxabeam and the MaxaBlaster. Short and long focal-length reflectors both maximize candlepower at the expense of a more distinct center hole in flood mode, but they do it conversely. Short focal-length reflectors maximize the reflection distances for the light directed to the front of the source rather than to the rear. The rear distances are so small, the rear light is essentially the same as the front spill light from a long focal-length reflector, and does nothing for either the focused beam nor for flood mode because it's too spread out. A forward-facing retro-reflector could be used for the rear light in a short focal-length application, just as a rear-facing retro-reflector could be used to for the front light in a long focal-length application.

    Short and long focal length are converse solutions, but I'm opting for long focal length because the overall size of the housing is greatly reduced and more weight balanced. This is because the reflector is shorter, and the lamp and lamp mount assembly can be moved forward to within the reflector to make a dual-purpose use of space. Also, a long focal-length reflector allows for a much larger vertex hole needed for air ventilation without reducing light gather.

    If I make a smaller, more versatile Xiphos version, it will likely be both a smaller reflector and a smaller housing, with smaller ventilation and fan strictly for low-power lamps, up to 300 watts. It would also cost considerably less to produce, but the fun stuff comes first.
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  7. #97
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    Wow, that seems complex to maximize the design. Thanks for the explanation. I can't believe the cost of the reflector you need for max candlepower, that really bites. From the way I read your post it looks like you would prefer to use a different lamp for max candlepower versus a more useful beam, correct?

  8. #98
    Flashaholic* get-lit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    The lamp is a super class short arc lamp, and I'm thrilled with it. It has a small luminous area relative to output, even smaller than the 1600W XBO (used in the Nightsun SX-16 searchlight) with comparable lumen output. It is also a DC lamp, so it concentrates the light closer to the cathode, but not as concentrated as the XBO 1600W. It should be on par with the XBO 1600W overall. The light concentration could be more condensed if it were fed more amps than volts, but then the power supply would be much larger and about 20 times heavier because it would require more current-limiting components, which are what make the up the bulk of the power supply.

    Also, the lamp would require a much larger sealing method to handle the amps. The current lamp uses all low-expansion materials in a compact overall size. The lamp seal is Molybdenum foil sealed within Quartz glass. Molybdenum foil is the only metal that doesn't expand and crack the Quartz glass when heated. Since this sealing method does not expand, it's the only method that can be used with a lamp-mounted retro-reflector. On the other hand, hi amperage lamp seals are what make lamps so much bigger and heavier in high power configurations. They also eliminate the possibility of using a lamp-mounted retro-reflector because they are constructed of materials of varying expansion rates along the length of the glass. The current lamp has the highest output achievable with Molybdenum seals that best accommodate portability in a high power light, and again the only way to accommodate a lamp-mounted retro-reflector.

    Since the lamp produces the same (a bit more) output as a 1600 watt short arc Quartz Xenon lamp, while using only 800-900 Watts, it requires just over half the power to the lamp, and the power supply is more efficient by requiring less current output. So again, for portability with portable batteries or generators, it's the only way to go. It's also the only way to run the light from boat or automobile power without requiring super hi amp alternators and extra batteries with limited runtime.

    It also produces less than half the heat of a 1600 watt short arc Quartz Xenon lamp. Therefore, it requires much less cooling ventilation ducting and fan size, again better for accommodating a portable system.

    When it comes to super class lights, mercury-based high-pressure short arc lamps better accommodate portability in every aspect. For the same overall system size and weight with a Quartz Xenon configuration, total output would be cut in half.

    If you want more candlepower with mercury-based high-pressure short arc lamps having Molybdenum seals, you would just reduce the lamp voltage and arc gap. Then you have yourself a P-VIP type lamp, which I'm making this usable for as well.

    EDIT: Also, the cost of the reflector is on par with the cost of the other components; namely the ballast and the lamp. So that's not a big deal here.
    Last edited by get-lit; 10-01-2013 at 08:42 AM.
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  9. #99
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    Quote Originally Posted by get-lit View Post
    EDIT: Also, the cost of the reflector is on par with the cost of the other components; namely the ballast and the lamp. So that's not a big deal here.
    Wow, that makes me all the more appreciative of your efforts and explanations to CPF. This is a serious investment, indeed.

  10. #100
    Flashaholic* get-lit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    I've been conflicted over the compromises for "all out" CP and probably going with something that works much better all around, something without limited headwind, with excellent flood capability, longer lasting brightness, full lamp life, more streamlined design, and weight balanced, but still with around 60 MCP rather than 100 MCP.
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  11. #101
    Flashaholic* get-lit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    Hi all, I did some testing to compare spot patterns and flood patterns of medium focal length reflectors vs short focal length reflectors. To do this more easily, I used 1/3.75x scale reflectors (in relation to the actual light) and a 14W 1.5mm gap Solarc lamp. Here's the results:

    CANDLEPOWER: Both Medium Focal Length and Long Focal Length produce the same "max" lux, however the Medium Focal Length produces the same max lux across roughly 4 times the beam area of the Short Focal Length, and although the Short Focal Length produced the same max lux across a smaller diameter, it's beam was wider and dimmer outside the max lux region. You can see these differences in the photos, but keep in mind these differences are more noticeable in person, since photos on screen can't reveal the actual dynamic range of brightness.

    LUMEN OUTPUT: The Medium Focal Length outputs 20% more lumen. For the full scale light to be produced, the difference will be 16% due to the DC lamp being oriented to optimize light gather, vs the AC lamp used in the small scale test.

    FLOOD PATTERN: The Short Focal Length simply kicks butt. Not much to say here when you look at the photos. The Short Focal Length is so much more versatile in this regard. My earlier modeling of the Short FL did not render the brightness variance in flood mode as well as we'd see it, and I was led to believe Short Focal Length lights such as the Maxabeam lose too much light in flood pattern than other focal lengths. Not true.


    MEDIUM FL SPOT PATTERN (On White Screen)
    Canon EOS D60, ISO-100, 1/200 sec, f/2.8


    SHORT FL SPOT PATTERN (On White Screen)
    Canon EOS D60, ISO-100, 1/200 sec, f/2.8



    MEDIUM FL SPOT PATTERN (On Objects)
    Canon EOS D60, ISO-100, 1/30 sec, f/1.4


    SHORT FL SPOT PATTERN (On Objects)
    Canon EOS D60, ISO-100, 1/30 sec, f/1.4


    MEDIUM FL FLOOD PATTERN (On Objects)
    Canon EOS D60, ISO-100, 1/6 sec, f/1.4


    SHORT FL FLOOD PATTERN (On Objects)
    Canon EOS D60, ISO-100, 1/6 sec, f/1.4


    SHORT FL FLOOD PATTERN (On Objects) - Even Wider Flood With Still Much Smaller Hole
    Canon EOS D60, ISO-100, 1/6 sec, f/1.4


    Distances are 55 feet in a basement, so nevermind the mess. It's pool supplies stored for Winter.

    More Outside...

    MEDIUM FL SPOT PATTERN (On Trees)
    Canon EOS D60, ISO-100, 1/6 sec, f/1.4


    SHORT FL SPOT PATTERN (On Trees)
    Canon EOS D60, ISO-100, 1/6 sec, f/1.4


    MEDIUM FL FLOOD PATTERN (On Trees)
    Canon EOS D60, ISO-100, .6 sec, f/1.4


    SHORT FL FLOOD PATTERN (On Trees)
    Canon EOS D60, ISO-100, .6 sec, f/1.4


    Both above flood shots are spread just enough to begin to illuminate the last tree on the very far right. That tree is actually much more visible to the eye than the photos reveal. Something to consider is that a very high powered searchlight would not typically be used with this much fllood, so the hole in the Medium Focal Length would tend to be smaller than this for more typical flood use. Again, the Short Focal Length flood pattern is excellent, but the Medium Focal Length is much more "throwy" even with the same candlepower. This is because the max lux is located within much more of the beam diameter. With this little amount of lumen output in these tests, I could only see the beam in the outside atmosphere with the Medium Focal Length. It was definitely more fun to play with.

    I definitely consider the Medium Focal Length more of a "search" light and the Short Focal Length more of a "work" light. They are optimized for two different purposes. My last high powered beamshots were a Medium Focal Length design. I'm a bit disappointed because I was hoping to be impressed with the Short Focal Length for this application, and I don't think I will be going to a Short Focal Length after all. It's better for lower powered lights because they are geared for shorter distances which benefit more from a great flood pattern, but for very high powered lights, Medium Focal Length gets more light on target for the long haul and it's flood pattern would be limited to medium range distances rather than up close, therefore it's less capable flood pattern doesn't affect it so much. The SX-16 Nightsun is also a Medium Focal Length, but even more limited in flood due to it's massive vertex hole in the reflector.

    A long Focal Length would bring it up another notch, but without any flood capability whatsoever. I have a scaled Long Focal Length that I just might compare against the scaled Medium Focal Length.
    Last edited by get-lit; 03-08-2012 at 03:55 AM.
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  12. #102
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    I really enjoy reading your posts and especially your test results Get-Lit. You explain it so that's it really easy to understand a very technical subject!
    WWII 60" Anti Aircraft Carbon Arc (Sold), Short Arcs: 1.6KW NightSun, 1KW VSS-3A, .8KW TrakkaBeam, 600 Watt M-134 Gun Light, 500 Watt X-500-14s, 500 Watt Starburst, 300 Watt Locators, Megaray, 150 Watt Set Beam & Communicator, Maxabeam Gen3, LarryK14@52V

  13. #103
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    The idea of a 60mcp beam that can defocus to some useful flood sound like every spotlight junkie's dream. Really enjoyed the experimental shots with the Short FL reflector though. Thanks for the thorough updates Get-Lit. Like BVH stated, you make it pretty easy to understand what you're talking about.

  14. #104
    Flashaholic* get-lit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    Thanks guys. My dilemma was that modeling predicts 60 mcp with a short focal length, with the difference in cp being due to optimized orientation of the DC lamp. However, the max lux of the short focal length would be within a much smaller beam diameter and the medium focal length would still be more "throwy" with a more vivid light beam in the atmosphere and more light "on target" at distance.
    Last edited by get-lit; 04-04-2012 at 03:24 PM.
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    revising...
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  16. #106
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    great project!

  17. #107
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    I had considered a solution which would provide for 80+ MCP and great flood. It would use a very short focal length, but since practically no light rear of the source contributes to CP with a short FL, to attain this I'd use a forward-facing retro-reflector to apply that rear directed light to the reflector surface to the front of the source. It's a great all around solution and far exceeds the Medium FL in CP, as the Medium FL has no real use for a retro-reflector since the light is distributed evenly among short and long reflection distances.

    The solution has the same net result in CP as going with a long FL and a rear-facing retro-reflector of similar "overall" size for portability (diameters differ but overall size similar). But the long focal length has no variance in source to reflection distance over the source's luminance angles, and as a result, has the most limited flood ability (the most bright flood but with a massive center hole).

    So it would seem that a very short FL with forward-facing retro-reflector would be the best solution, but there is another consideration. Although these two solutions produce about the same CP, as mentioned before, the very short FL archieves max CP in a very small diameter surrounded by a flood in spot mode. On the other hand, nearly all of the light from a long FL is applied within the max CP diameter. It has much more of the max CP light. This aspect when combined with no flood in spot mode makes for the most visible beam of light and most "light on target" at distance.

    Here's some more modeled shots to illustrate. Note that...
    -These consider a fair amount of retro-reflector alignment loss and lamp glass re-transmission loss
    -These do not consider point of peak luminance within the source, which would provide additional peak beam luminance than calculated.
    -When considering point of peak luminance for this lamp, figure conservatively 25% additional peak beam luminance for Medium FL, and about 10% for retro-reflected models.

    Medium FL (Last Prototype)


    Very Short FL w/Retro-Reflector


    Long FL w/Retro-Reflector


    Here's with beam intensities highlighted...

    Medium FL


    Very Short FL w/Retro-Reflector



    Long FL w/Retro-Reflector


    The red circle is the peak illuminance beam diameter, over 80 MCP with retro-reflected very short FL and retro-reflected long FL, but the
    long FL has MUCH more of it, and it's average illuminance beam diameter is double the lux. The Long FL with retro-reflector simply can't be matched, but flood is not so good, super large hole with flood at only 23.32 degrees total. It's basically a ring of light, courtesty of high etendue f/D ratio.

    Long FL Flood


    So inevitably, if you want to have the best of both worlds, the most visible beam with most light on target at distance, and great flood ability, you must have two different lights. I'm well aware I've been going in circles with this, it's been a very difficult decision. When it's all said and done, I think I would always be wishing I had gone big, so at this point I'm all in for long FL with retro-reflector. I can make something for more practical use later. Keep in mind, the last real beam shots were of the Medium FL, so if you liked those, it only gets much better.
    Last edited by get-lit; 03-14-2012 at 09:26 PM.
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  18. #108
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    Quote Originally Posted by get-lit View Post
    Long FL w/Retro-Reflector

    DROOOLLL
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  19. #109
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    +2 to that!
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  20. #110
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    +3 to that!!
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  21. #111
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    Thanks for the support. A 12" reflector is just too big, so I'm going with 11" with the same FL. Much more manageable size. Net beam lumen will be 50k instead of ~53k and estimated CP at ~75M instead of ~82M. It's not much of a trade off because much of the candlepower comes from closer to the vertex rather than the aperture in this configuration, due to the long FL in conjunction with the length/height relation of the luminous area.

    Edit: When going back and forth between the 12" and 11" beam drawings in this configuration, it is very difficult to notice any difference at all. It's so subtle that 11" is the clear choice for portability and headwind concerns.
    Last edited by get-lit; 03-16-2012 at 10:34 PM.
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    Quote Originally Posted by get-lit View Post
    It would use a very short focal length, but since practically no light rear of the source contributes to CP with a short FL, to attain this I'd use a forward-facing retro-reflector to apply that rear directed light to the reflector surface to the front of the source.
    Nice progress!

    Can you draw a picture of this? Do you have a big hole in the short FL reflector so you added another reflector to collect more light? What equation would allow you to reflect into the reflector again , both are forward facing, yet still stay parabola?

    I am using a 9.6" short 0.75" FL reflector shape similar to Maxa Beam reflector, it has a small rear opening about 2", The focal point is about 1/2 inch above that rear hole. would love to try adding a retro reflector if it could be further improve CP, just not quite understand how would this work?
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  23. #113
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    The 9.6" CA .75" FL is a great reflector, with lots of reflection distance in front of the source, and pretty much worthless behind the source, so it's very suitable for a forward-facing retro-reflector to take advantage of that rearward light.

    The retro-reflector is NOT a parabola. It's a spheric reflector to redirect the light from the source back to the source again, but in the opposite direction. It has some losses due to the additional reflection, and passing through the lamp glass again. As the lamp ages, the losses begin to increase, but even until the end of lamp life, CP is greatly benefited if everything is optimized. That's why I include lamp life as a parameter for modeling. I run comparisons at 50% lamp life to find out the average benefit with a retro-reflector. Reflection losses aren't so bad with a spheric reflector because reflection angles are perpendicular, whereas reflectance is lost at more incident angles (another reason I like long FL). I'm actually having the retro-reflectors Rhodium coated and applying a new 90% reflectance enhanced coating.

    Try to keep the retro-reflector small so that it can fit within the primary reflector without too big of a hole, especially if you plan to also have space for forced air to pass. For instance a 1.5" diameter retro-reflector would fit nicely within a 2" vertex hole with some space for air to pass. Where it gets tricky is if you want to offset the focus for flood (this reflector will produce a great flood), you really have to minimize the vertex hole diameter because a ton of light could easily be lost with a short FL reflector having a large vertex hole when focus is offset.

    What lamp are you using? I could model it up to optimize your retro-reflector dimensions. Better yet, I'll post a URL for you to do this yourself. I wrote the program as a web application. However, I don't want to be consuming CPU and bandwidth, so I'd have to set it up with a password for you play around with. You'll be able to see just how much light is being lost through the vertex hole, without or without a retro-reflector, by entering different values for the vertex hole diameter. But I only have the luminous intensity profile measured and entered for a short-arc DC mercury lamp, so for instance if you are using AC, you would currently have to model it with the DC lamp twice for each comparison, once with the anode "out" and once with the anode "in", and then average the results for AC. Not as good as actually measuring the luminous intensity profile and entering it in, but should be fairly close for something quick.

    However, if you want to do the work of measuring your lamp's luminous intensity profile and then send me the measurements, I'll set up the lamp profile for you. You'd just record lux readings for each angle from 0-180 degrees. They have to be measured from the same exact distance, so you could use a string. Of course the measurements would also have to be taken in the dark without light colored walls, outside would be better. The readings are then totaled and relative luminance values are generated for each angle. The program actually iterates at 1/2 angles, so you could take 1/2 angle measurements but that would be 360 measurements and not really necessary.

    Edit: Here's the URL. I'll PM the PW. Be sure to read through the info at the bottom to get an understanding of how it works.
    Last edited by get-lit; 04-04-2012 at 03:29 PM.
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  24. #114
    Flashaholic* get-lit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    I've modeled the housing with 11"CA Long-FL primary reflector with retro-reflector. Managed to get the large aperture in a strong compact light-weight balanced design...



    Last edited by get-lit; 03-24-2012 at 12:15 AM.
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    Hi there get-lit. The above modelling of your light looks really really nice to me, however I just thought that I would make a suggestion or two. In the pictures it looks as though the lead/cord runs pretty close to the top rear edge, which also appears to be quite sharp looking. I am not too sure if the modelling of your light is an exact representation or not, but maybe the top rear edge that is located just below the lead should be slightly smoother and more rounded or "angled off", so as to avoid any possibly damaging long term chafing.

    You also could "angle off" the bottom rear edge a little as well so that it would be parallel to the ground, as not only would this then match the top one a little more, but it would also provide a much larger surface area to support the rear of the light for whenever it was to be laid down on a flat surface, as opposed to a very easily damaged sharp edge, and therefore it would also provide a much more stable resting platform for the rear of the light.

    Also, and due to the fact that I have only ever read about it (as opposed to hearing about it) the one thing that is slightly confusing is the branding, and just how it is actually pronounced. Is it a night-sword or is it a nights-word? It may or may not look quite as neat, but maybe a hyphen or a spacing is in order! Actually, after having another look at it I don't think that a space between the two words would look that bad at all, especially if that fine line that runs right through them is still a continuos one!

    Alternatively, and if it really is a "NIGHT SWORD" just as I am guessing that it is, then maybe to seperate the two words you could just place a symbol of a sword vertically between the "T" and the "S" and leaning over at the same angle as the letters, or horizontally so it looks a bit like a hyphen. If you much prefer not to separate the two words, then you could just have it so that the brand name is actually positioned longitudinally along the blade of a sword.


    Anyway these are just my thoughts, but I must say that the rest of it looks quite exquisite, and lastly I was just wondering when my sample will be arriving!



    Sincerely Yours
    Phil Ament

    P.S. Hey there people, I wouldn't mind some feedback on my observations and my comments!
    Last edited by Phil Ament; 03-24-2012 at 09:24 AM. Reason: Typo

  26. #116
    Flashaholic* ma_sha1's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    alternatively, maybe run the cord through the bottom in?stead top?
    My Mods.. http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/...5&postcount=78
    Hobby only, I don't do custom mods as a service, thanks for understanding.

  27. #117
    Flashaholic* get-lit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    I appreciate the feedback, especially with the little touches. I prefer not to run the cord from underneath, as the light should be able to rest flat on the bottom with the reflector over an edge. Also the rear bottom edge would tent to land on the cord when setting the light down on occasion. I will see if I can include a slight recessed eyelet along the top rear edge of the housing.

    I considered ramping up the bottom trailing edge of the housing to meet the angle when resting on the aperture, and it's probably something that should be done. It will add slightly to the overall length in order to fit the components inside.

    I came up with the name as a spin off from the Nightsun. The Nightsun is aptly named as an airborne light that's like the sun shining down at night. I named this conversely as a hand-held light, a sword of light. I suppose Lightsword would be good, but that's already been used for other projects in the past. I may add a slight spacing between the words. If you look closely, there is a horizontal beam of light through the logo coming from the "D" and it could pass through the space as a dash. Thanks for the thoughts on this.

    I can't give a timeline on the progress, only a rundown of what's currently being accomplished. At the moment, a mandrel and tooling are underway for a retro-reflector I designed to mount to the lamp. It will be replaceable and very easily X-Y-Z aligned. The primary reflector for the first run is being worked on as well. Tooling will be required for this in the future to make it more cost effective. Another "Anode and Cathode" Thermocouple-Embedded lamp is also being made at the moment since the last one had the Anode thermocouple lead vaporized from accidentally resting near the high voltage lead. I'm also performing final testing for the rain-proof exhaust vent. I've recently completed testing for the filtered rain-proof inake vent. I've also revised the motor-focus X-Y-Z alignment components and I'm very pleased with the outcome. It's simple, strong, precise, very easy to use, and provides a tensioned buffer for the lamp with hard hits.
    Last edited by get-lit; 03-24-2012 at 03:37 PM.
    I like big bulbs and I can not lie, you other brothers can't deny!

  28. #118
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    Hi again get-lit and I am glad that you may consider this feedback to be of some assistance. When you said the following I just wanted you to know that I had actually noticed it, if that helps at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by get-lit View Post
    I may add a slight spacing between the words. If you look closely, there is a horizontal beam of light through the logo coming from the "D" and it could pass through the space as a dash. Thanks for the thoughts on this.
    In my previous post I had actually been trying to suggest that exact same thing, although maybe I had not worded it quite clearly enough.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Ament View Post
    Actually, after having another look at it I don't think that a space between the two words would look that bad at all, especially if that fine line that runs right through them is still a continuos one!

    Phil Ament

  29. #119
    Flashaholic* get-lit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Nightsword project

    To be honest, I'm not much concerned about a name, it could be called the Mega Luxcrapper for all I care, I'm more focused on the design and construction.
    I like big bulbs and I can not lie, you other brothers can't deny!

  30. #120
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    Thumbs up Re: The Nightsword project

    Quote Originally Posted by get-lit View Post
    To be honest, ..... it could be called the Mega Luxcrapper for all I care.........
    MegaLuxcrapper
    if your not wearing a #12 welding screen than it ain't bright enough! "Hand-Sun H.I.D." 55w & 75w(for sale), Rocky 3w LED, Stanley 109 35w mod'd, Maxa-Beam Gen II, 55w hid/100w incan Vector Twin, 400w MH long arc, 100w MH mid arc. Amondotech n30.

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