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Thread: The 30" Night Hawk

  1. #91
    Flashaholic* LightSward's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    I will NOT be using this product on my next 30 inch Night Hawk Searchlight. Seen how it works.Terrible the day it arrived. I was so optimistic. Boooo!


    DON'T USE ALSACORP Killer Chrome Products!
    They s_ck!

    Last edited by LightSward; 03-22-2013 at 11:29 PM.

  2. #92
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Going to find out real soon if the ALSACORP reflector paint kit (at over $130 plus shipping), works. Disappointed though, the instruction video was smashed and part of the over coat spray can was smashed. Bad packing and bad handling on UPS part?! Also parts of the kit missing and terrible customer service...they just hang up.

    I hope this stuff reflects at least 50 to 60 percent of the light and will be able to clearly see my face. Hopefully this won't have the 'sort of grey foggy mirror look so many cans actually provide. If this is the case, basically $600 dollars wasted, with electrolyte-plating, and expensive spray chromes, trying to find an alternative to the Chrome Tape that works very well, just not as professional looking. I get some orange peel look to the tape, but not too bad.
    Last edited by LightSward; 02-23-2013 at 10:58 PM.

  3. #93
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Here are some photos of the "production" model of the 30 inch NightHawk, home addition. Lightweight and easy to transport, and very affordable. I thought it nice to show the simplified steps, using a concrete mold.



    Here is the small cluster, (10 mm square light source area), of the 1000 watt halogen 28,000 lumen bulb!





    Small filament cluster bulb to be used in home version of the NightHawk.
    Inexpensive and last 200 hours!


    Next is the concrete mold, visible through the different colors of candle wax and the translucent fiberglass.



    I use a heat gun to melt and polish smooth the candle wax and then buff to a shine.


    I'm streamlining the fan and cooling system and making an easy to access light bulb, "pull out drawer".


    Frame and basic glass work in preparation for the streamlined cooling system.


    Almost ready to test that new ALSACORP mirror spray. Hope it works like the ad above.
    Last edited by LightSward; 02-19-2013 at 12:05 AM. Reason: spelling

  4. #94
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Production shell off the mold...excellent...perfect...don't have to fill in any voids. Way better, new, improved fiber glassing routine. Glass smooth. I need to do some more exterior work and then....(drum roll) the test of the ALSACORP., mirror product. Hope it works...I've read mixed reviews online. More photos soon for CPF and the client that this has been sold to.

  5. #95
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Sounds great LightSward! If the spray doesn't work out, you may want to ask in the DIY screen forum for home theaters over at avsforums.com. They have many methods of making nearly perfect reflective surface for little cost. But it looks like that spray you have would do a great job.
    I like big bulbs and I can not lie, you other brothers can't deny!

  6. #96
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Quote Originally Posted by get-lit View Post
    Sounds great LightSward! If the spray doesn't work out, you may want to ask in the DIY screen forum for home theaters over at avsforums.com. They have many methods of making nearly perfect reflective surface for little cost. But it looks like that spray you have would do a great job.
    I've done all the prep work, a few minor blemishes here and there, but if this stuff is what it is suppose to be, I'll know by tomorrow afternoon. I watched the products own website demos., and they slightly contradicted themselves on the application method and results where less than advertised. Only one of their demo., sites had an older guy that seemed to do what their own instructions said and had far superior results shown on their site.

    Should know by 5pm Friday...today.

  7. #97
    Flashaholic* get-lit's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Whatever the results are, even though it couldn't match the results of the intensive process of electroformed reflective coatings, I have a feeling this will be well worth the effort and super low cost. Really looking forward to this. The 30" diameter gives you ability to overpower a fair degree of surface imperfection.
    Last edited by get-lit; 02-22-2013 at 02:09 PM.
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  8. #98
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Keep all those great suggestions coming. I need to do a better job researching.
    Last edited by LightSward; 02-23-2013 at 10:57 PM.

  9. #99
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Thank you everyone for suggestions, and keep them coming!

    After careful review and consideration I don't think the ALSACORP Killer Chrome product line is suitable for this project. It provided a wonderful base coat for upper layers of a different product more suitable for this project. I went to a local hardware store and found a more suitable spray chrome that makes a wonderful backing for what I will have to cover with....uhhggg...the chrome tape which provides a superior reflective surface. The hardware store chrome will make a good backing and fill for the gaps in the tape. I think with a nice 'pie slice' placement of the tape, a professional and appealing appearance will be met.


    Top part inexpensive 'Bright Chrome', hardware store paint and bottom portion, 'dull ALSACORP chrome paint'.
    Comparison of ALSACORP 'dull' chrome to hardware bright chrome paint on upper portion of reflector.





    Inexpensive hardware store Chrome Paint is almost good enough but will will have to have chrome tape applied. The gaps in the pie slices of chrome tape will be nicely 'filled' by the underlying chrome paint.



    Hand reflection in hardware store paint placed 'over' the "unsuitable" ALSACORP dull chrome paint.


    Inexpensive Hardware chrome paint pretty good.


    Searchlight barrel frame prep.


    With the pricey chrome tape search still not over...I will use chrome paint to back prep the reflector and then use pie slices of the chrome tape to make a professional and highly reflective surface. I plan on bringing these lights to the Seattle Area CPF Get together this Spring.

    DON'T USE ALSACORP Killer Chrome PRODUCTS for searchlights. Use Local Hardware or Auto parts store Chrome paint instead.
    Last edited by LightSward; 02-23-2013 at 11:02 PM.

  10. #100
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    Party Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Excited to see this final mirror film applied. Now I can concentrate on finishing the light so the New York City owner can take possession in a couple weeks.

    Chrome Film is applied. You can see a much brighter, clearer reflection of hand.


    Chrome Mirror film now added to searchlight making hand reflection brighter than with spray paint mirror.. Makes a very bright beam already!


    Careful application of reflective mirror film, allows much brighter reflection.


    The cooling whole is offset from the center to allow cooling fan etc., to come in from the side a little, to 'streamline' the backside of the searchlight.


    Chrome Mirror film now added to searchlight. Makes a very bright beam already!
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-02-2013 at 09:07 AM. Reason: thoughts

  11. #101
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    That's much better. The problem with spray is the micro reflective material is applied at entirely random angles. Since you're this far into the project, maybe look into DIY electroforming? I leave that to the experts but you might want to check it out.

    EDIT: I just did a quick search and found that DIY electroplating is quite common and can be somewhat easy. I don't know if or how electroplating differs from electroforming, but the process would need to align all the micro reflective material. The only issue for you is you'd need a metal surface to electroplate. If you could figure that out, you'd be set for a mirror finish. Of course the tried and true method is spin forming with a mandrel, but the mandrel is extremely expensive for this size. Maybe a sheet metal pressing method? Just giving ideas since you'll be making these.

    Also look into vacuum depositing, but it may be way too expensive. Google DIY vacuum depositing. I found these:
    http://publiclaboratory.org/notes/wa...making-mirrors
    http://www.finishing.com/4200-4399/4359.shtml
    Last edited by get-lit; 02-28-2013 at 12:47 AM.
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  12. #102
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    Cool Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Quote Originally Posted by get-lit View Post
    That's much better. The problem with spray is the micro reflective material is applied at entirely random angles. Since you're this far into the project, maybe look into DIY electroforming? I leave that to the experts but you might want to check it out.

    EDIT: I just did a quick search and found that DIY electroplating is quite common and can be somewhat easy. I don't know if or how electroplating differs from electroforming, but the process would need to align all the micro reflective material. The only issue for you is you'd need a metal surface to electroplate. If you could figure that out, you'd be set for a mirror finish. Of course the tried and true method is spin forming with a mandrel, but the mandrel is extremely expensive for this size. Maybe a sheet metal pressing method? Just giving ideas since you'll be making these.

    Also look into vacuum depositing, but it may be way too expensive. Google DIY vacuum depositing. I found these:
    http://publiclaboratory.org/notes/wa...making-mirrors
    http://www.finishing.com/4200-4399/4359.shtml
    Thanks for keeping the suggestions coming. I have gained much needed knowledge from these. I did try electroplating, and was quite successful with small things but was needing large tanks and lots of 'evil' scarey chemicals, (maybe not that bad but hundreds of gallons of it!), The Go Edmund mirror sheets were great but adhesive and compound curve issues prevent me from trusting that product yet. I am fairly comfortable with the film reflective chrome tapes, because an end user, (customer), can do repairs themselves, by just driving ten minutes to the nearest auto parts dealer and picking some up. Puts up with lots of abuse and rubbing and cleaning take a while to show damage.

    I'll look further. Many brands of potato chips have a reflective coating inside the bag to maybe make it look like you have more chips...I DK but may work well for my adobe and potato chip bag searchlight. I'm just bringing this up, because of how great the 'film' mirror stuff has become and so inexpensive and fairly easy to use..

  13. #103
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk



    My usual photo bucket isn't working to well, so I'm just using Facebook to post photos on one of my Forum threads I publish.




    • A great shot of the reflector's handmade quality image. So artistic...LOL
    • Decent shot of the handmade reflector. This thing works well, despite all the little blemishes. The cooling whole is offset from the center to allow cooling fan etc., to come in from the side a little, to 'streamline' the backside of the searchlight.




    I hope this works. I had to use Facebook as a photo bucket, Flickr takes hours per photo now. This blue underline is annoying




    • A great shot of the aluminum barrel housing.





    • The cooling whole is offset from the center to allow cooling fan etc., to come in from the side a little, to 'streamline' the backside of the searchlight.
    • A great shot of the aluminum barrel housing. This provides a great shielding from the intense light rays bursting forth from the super bright 1,000 watt halogen small filament projector bulb.


    • A steel hoop is made from pipe. This is one of the primary framing components of all my searchlights. the steel provides a great mounting and secure force distributor to ensure good product handling and years of performance.
    • Here is a picture of the handmade reflector.



    Here is a great shot of many colors reflecting off the 30 inch Nighthawk. The cooling whole is offset from the center to allow cooling fan etc., to come in from the side a little, to 'streamline' the backside of the searchlight.
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-02-2013 at 09:52 PM. Reason: a bunch of stuff

  14. #104
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Jared Wells added 4 photos.

    I'm still in search of the 'perfect' reflective material. If anyone has worked with anything not too drastic LMK, (let me know).
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-01-2013 at 12:41 AM.

  15. #105
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    I'd say this turned out to be really good reflective surface, but with an orange peal effect, which I think would have the same effect on the beam as orange peal for our EDC lights... blends out the edge of the beam at a loss of central lux.

    EDIT: I think the orange peal would be greatly reduced if a thin film reflective material were applied with minimal adhesive, because it appears to me as if it's the thickness of the adhesive itself that is causing the orange peal. I'd say get away from self-adhesive film, and use a reflective thin film with a light brushing of separate adhesive. There are also templates for cutting lines into sheet to fill round shapes without creases. Look into these two things and I think you could completely eliminate the orange peal. If you could get a more pliable film, it might not need cutting to fill the shape of the reflector.

    Here's something I noticed about the parabola which could be useful for a different method... when pulling the center of a flat surface inward, it naturally forms to a parabolic shape. Maybe you could experiment with this to form a parabola from a flat reflective material.

    Also something extremely easy would be a vacuum thermo-forming method. Look into vacuum forming acrylic or polycarbonate sheet with a mirror surface, or any other heat form-able sheet having a mirror surface. It's super quick and easy! No fiberglass layup etc. Once you have the mold, heat, and vacuum assembly set up, each part would take about 3 seconds to form once heated. The vacuum could be attached at the vertex hole of the mold. This will work as long as the large focal length keeps the heat of the lamp far from the surface. You'd first have to to a quick test to see how the mrirror film backing responds to being thermo-formed, which is easy enough, just heat a sheet and and suck it into the mold with a shop vac. The mirror surface would have to face out-ward, otherwise if it's behind the sheet material, the sheet material would deflect the light.
    Last edited by get-lit; 03-01-2013 at 06:34 AM.
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  16. #106
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    Cool Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Quote Originally Posted by get-lit View Post
    I'd say this turned out to be really good reflective surface, but with an orange peal effect, which I think would have the same effect on the beam as orange peal for our EDC lights... blends out the edge of the beam at a loss of central lux.

    EDIT: I think the orange peal would be greatly reduced if a thin film reflective material were applied with minimal adhesive, because it appears to me as if it's the thickness of the adhesive itself that is causing the orange peal. I'd say get away from self-adhesive film, and use a reflective thin film with a light brushing of separate adhesive. There are also templates for cutting lines into sheet to fill round shapes without creases. Look into these two things and I think you could completely eliminate the orange peal. If you could get a more pliable film, it might not need cutting to fill the shape of the reflector.

    Here's something I noticed about the parabola which could be useful for a different method... when pulling the center of a flat surface inward, it naturally forms to a parabolic shape. Maybe you could experiment with this to form a parabola from a flat reflective material.

    Also something extremely easy would be a vacuum thermo-forming method. Look into vacuum forming acrylic or polycarbonate sheet with a mirror surface, or any other heat form-able sheet having a mirror surface. It's super quick and easy! No fiberglass layup etc. Once you have the mold, heat, and vacuum assembly set up, each part would take about 3 seconds to form once heated. The vacuum could be attached at the vertex hole of the mold. This will work as long as the large focal length keeps the heat of the lamp far from the surface. You'd first have to to a quick test to see how the mirror film backing responds to being thermo-formed, which is easy enough, just heat a sheet and and suck it into the mold with a shop vac. The mirror surface would have to face out-ward, otherwise if it's behind the sheet material, the sheet material would deflect the light.
    Yes I agree... I tried: Edmund Optics, and was thrilled with the mirror surfacing on both sides, but ran into trouble with the compound curves and the adhesive, time issue, application process such as repositioning if an error is made while positioning material, and the 'bubbling' and 'un-adhesiving' that occurred afterwards, partly from the compound curves, etc. Plus I still need to work out minor blemish issues with my molding process,etc., that causes a loss of optical purity, during surface prep., etc. I like this slightly less than perfect reflective treatment, largely because it is very forgiving during application, puts up with a lot of surface abuse, is very inexpensive at maybe now: $4.50 or so maybe five dollars to cover the entire 30 inch reflector, takes two or three hours to cut and apply.

    I've been looking into a way to heat a large surface area equally without taking more shop space in my very small building area. I could build a smaller device, but with my 9 mm to 14 mm arc and filament area light sources I'm using right now, I want to stay with something like the 30 inch reflector range.

    As you said some kind of a film with a good adhesion process that works like the tapes, or something like it, will be great. I'll again start looking into the heating of the mirror and sagging, etc with vacuum. I saw that method, and many more, on a video I mentioned earlier in this, or another thread, that helped me learn all the reflector making processes. He doesn't go for the same level of precision, since he is making solar ovens with his and just uses things that 'resemble' the required shape.

    I look forward to improving this light, and all the others. As silly as this sounds...at least I have some options to look into. Not too many years ago, there was very little out there that was economical and easy to use to make curved, mirror surfaces. At least I have these films and tapes to work with.

    Thanks for the tips. I will look into making kind of an 'oven', maybe out of a metal box I can make and then heat it with my heat gun, use oven heating element, etc., and my shop vac...?

  17. #107
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Originally I was going to position a double ended bulb sideways to the 30 inch NightHawk reflector, but have been happy with single ended bulbs instead. The double ended bulb will work for quick re-strikes, because the air cooling is directly on the arc chamber, so it cools almost instantly. I have positioned a double ended bulb on the center axis of the 36 inch GORILLA reflector, with a hole in the split reflector. Re-starts almost instantly, but the UV is a bit of a problem if I run the searchlight inside, lighting a ceiling or follow spot.

    In this AutoCAD rendering I did, you can see the spherical split reflector with no cooling hole in the middle like I actually cutout to allow better air flow, since the center tends to be the, "searchlight blind spot", anyway.



    I will play with some of these ideas. For now I am using some halogen 1,000 watt 28,000 lumen bulbs. This way people can turn the light on for just a few seconds like a regular bright flashlight, used just for quick scouting, or leave it on longer if desired. That way with short run times, the battery can be conserved easier and be smaller, light weight as a result. I'm going for tow types of lights: The one I'm making to sell right now, with the tempered glass front, and the light weight walkable, short hike model. These both use the 1,000 watt halogen bulbs, but the deluxe model uses the HMI 100,000 lumen bulb!
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-02-2013 at 09:45 PM. Reason: spelling factor of 10

  18. #108
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Quote Originally Posted by BVH View Post
    I didn't need a reason to get mine when I bought it! Just jump in and pick one up. There are plenty for sale. I hear my old gem is for sale again. Hey, Pismo's my neck of the woods!


    Here is a shot of the Gorilla, the big brother to the NightHawk, trying to look like the Big Boss...the 60 inch WWII anti-aircraft searchlight that I have practically worshiped my whole life....(I got that way watching all those searchlights in Las Vegas).


    The 30 inch NightHawk will be ready to pose it's beta, commercial finished look in the next few weeks. Stay Tuned. Don't change that web page or go to another thread...
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-03-2013 at 12:00 AM.

  19. #109
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    That's way too nice of a car to be subjecting all of that UV light to.

    EDIT: I just realized you're using halogen, so UV isn't so much a big deal. However, the HID lamps you're planning to use do contain mercury which creates very intense UV.
    Last edited by get-lit; 03-05-2013 at 10:04 AM.
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    Cool Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Quote Originally Posted by get-lit View Post
    That's way too nice of a car to be subjecting all of that UV light to.

    EDIT: I just realized you're using halogen, so UV isn't so much a big deal. However, the HID lamps you're planning to use do contain mercury which creates very intense UV.
    Aw, you were correct the first time. This particular time, it did contain a: double ended, HMI, 25 year old, West Germany bulb spewing out tons well, pounds of Ozone, (smells like a swimming pool when operating), and I had to install a UV shield to prevent sunburn and damaged eyes. The halogen bulbs are going to be used for the First Time, in these consumer lights. I have not used incandescent of any type in years.

    HMI and HID bulbs already in use. Halogen is part of the future for easy use and quick on off cycles.

  21. #111
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Given the heads-up, around ten or so more 30 inch NightHawks may be on order soon. People wanting to see how the Light Comes out next week or so before they commit. Even if I sold just a few more, that would be awesome.

    How about a Spring Seattle area Get Together 2013? I've got some new Big Lights to show.
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-08-2013 at 11:56 PM.

  22. #112
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Thread: Seattle Area 2013 Spring Candle Power Forum Get Together at the Barn


    I'm building new lights to show!


    Lets get this going!
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-10-2013 at 09:45 PM.

  23. #113
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    Party Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Quote Originally Posted by LightSward View Post
    What interest is there in the 1,000 watt incandescent model with front lens for $650.oo versus 1,200 watt HMI, (4xlight output of incandescent.) for $1,400.oo and full model with panning 90 degree mechanism for $1,600.oo and full model with 360 degree panning for $1,725.oo?

    Who wants what?
    I'm working on a Back Packing, short or long walk carry or back pack model that should only cost a few hundred dollars...$350.oo ish. I'll see what I can get ready for the Spring Get Together in the North West are.

  24. #114
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Here are some progress photos for the production searchlight. Still doesn't look like much, but will be a searchlight next week:.


    Light bulb, electrical switch and custom Lamb front

    Light bulb, electrical switch and custom Lamb front mount where 'bat symbol' would go.


    Glass and searchlight body checked for 'fit'.

    Glass and searchlight body are checked for 'fit and adjustments made.'.



    Glass "O-ring" fastened to glass

    Glass "O-ring" is fastened to glass, starting the first phase of making a removable 'lens'.


    Barrel and main searchlight body have another paint and sealer applied

    Barrel and main searchlight body get another paint and sealer coating applied.

    A few delays, products not working like they should...but light should be ready by early next week.
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-13-2013 at 10:30 PM. Reason: photos

  25. #115
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    It's coming along. Thanks for keep us posted!
    I like big bulbs and I can not lie, you other brothers can't deny!

  26. #116
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Hopefully in a just a few days I'll be delivering the first off the assembly line, Thirty, (30), inch Nigh-Hawk searchlight, to client. Some of the processes that usually only take twenty minutes or so, took all day or more...back and forth to the store, etc. I should have an almost completed searchlight to photograph next day or so, and hopefully one that is focused, tested and ready for shipping, next week! Turned into a labor of Love!
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-15-2013 at 10:40 PM. Reason: Labor of Love

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    Icon15 Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Off for a few days...Had to buy another computer...

    Ran into a serious set back I never encountered...at least at this level:

    The problem specifically is; reflective coating is de-laminating due to micro high pressure 'off gassing' from some experimental products, probably the ALSACORP RIP OFF, inadvertently used as some under coatings. It should have been 'the reflective' coating, but that was a $140 dollar rip. I may have it resolved shortly, Note: If I had shipped the searchlight last week as originally planned for the client, the de-lamination would have started about the time first turned it on...glad I caught it).

    I need time to see that things have stabilized and will probably have to 'shred' the original reflective coating to resolve the undercoating issue. Thousand of little tiny "bubbles" are now growing and linking together....very depressing. One of my earliest searchlights had no de-lamination issues at all. I will go back to using latex based coating...

    I'm bummed, thought I was ready to beta-sell these, but need a little more time...cry.

    I'll post some photos of this dilemma next few days, after I wipe the tears from my eyes.
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-21-2013 at 10:54 PM. Reason: thoughts

  28. #118
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    Party Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Here are the latest from cooling system, power control component glassing to reflector de-lamination.

    De-laminating Reflector wide angle.

    Reflector was looking good until some glass damage was repaired followed by a de-laminating event triggered by off gassing of various surface prep products. Unknown!




    Socket alignment and reflector de-lamination concern



    A combination CAD and hand drawn bulb socket mounting template is used to align and pre-focus bulb.



    Close-up of regular versus de-laminating section

    You can see a section of reflector film not de-laminating next to a section that is 'bubbling'.




    Cooling close-up

    Cooling system vent made partly from an electrical power grid supply 'service hood'. This allows easy removal for quick access to the light bulb socket bolts for periodic changing of the 200 hour, one thousand watt, halogen small filament arrayed projector bulb.



    Glassing of the various components.

    Cooling and power switch glassing. The air vent and fan connection will be glassed for strength.



    The client is being very patient with these few setbacks. Hopefully this de-lamination episode will be finished soon.
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-22-2013 at 03:53 PM. Reason: photos

  29. #119
    Flashaholic* LightSward's Avatar
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    Cool Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Well, even though the reflector and light have been plagued by some minor problems, I manged to get some beam shots with the blistered, bubbling reflective film covered NightHawk, production 1000 watt model. The blistering has gotten so bad, I wasn't able to get a perfect beam. I will scrap the reflector soon, and see if I can remove the suspect ALSACORP scam reflective coating that was suppose to solve all these issues that it only made worse. What comes around, goes around...Remember that ALSACORP when you rot in hell.


    Socket holder and neck collar


    The collar is imbedded in the fiberglass reflector itself. The bulb and split reflector are separate to allow easier bulb changing.





    Back side ready for 1st light test



    The roughly finished searchlight is inspected before final wiring, alignments and cowling. The paint job will give the NightHawk it's final look.






    Halogen bulb installed with split reflector and blistered scrap reflector in background


    Bulb and split reflector installed and ready to go. Main reflector in background has suffered a major setback...blisters caused by ALSACORP's scam product, undercoating, which is off gassing and bubbling the reflective film.

    The light is ready for test, even though much of it will have to be scrapped because of reflector malfunction. Still very informative.
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-22-2013 at 11:11 PM. Reason: photos

  30. #120
    Flashaholic* LightSward's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 30" Night Hawk

    Now the fun happens. Light the sky up with the new thousand watt halogen Nighthawk searchlight!


    Halogen bulb installed and ready to light up. Temporary air flow and other support systems

    You can see the temporary air flow director. The air flowing into the searchlight is aimed primarily at the bulb hot spot and split reflector.




    Halogen bulb on for the first time in 30 inch nighthawk

    Even though much of this light is headed for the scrap heap, I still wanted to light it up and see what all that work I've been doing should do.



    First time 1000 watt halogen bulb lit

    The first production 30 inch NightHawk searchlight is tested for the first time with a 1000 watt halogen bulb. The reflector suffered a defective new product off gassing caused de-lamination...ALSACORP is a scam!

    Next, I'll post the beam shots. They came out well, despite the reflector almost totally useless from the now, near total de-lamination.



    Bubbles and blisters growing and linking, rendering what would have been an awesome reflector, useless.



    Blisters caused by off gassing of ALSACORP's rip-off crummy product
    Last edited by LightSward; 03-22-2013 at 11:20 PM. Reason: photos

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