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Thread: Changing LED Tint With Filters

  1. #31

    Default Re: I'm an LED tint snob!

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Dean View Post
    My point with this thread wasn't to use filters to create a perfect color rendering light source, but only to share with other CPF members an inexpensive, easy, and completely reversible way to change the tint on their lights to virtually any color they want ..... warm, cool, pink, yellow, amber, red, etc.
    I understand that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Dean View Post
    What could be easier?
    Taking this quote slightly out of context , for one thing just flat-out saying that expanding the subject beyond the narrow scope you defined is unwelcome. If that is the case, then I will respect your wishes and refrain from commenting on anything outside of that scope in this thread.
    Last edited by GaAslamp; 08-25-2011 at 11:09 PM.

  2. #32
    Flashaholic* samuraishot's Avatar
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    I just got my book of filters from Lee. I did a quick test using an XPG R5-1C and just quickly flipped through the colors and it's neat how things turn out.

    If I understand the instructions correctly each filter has a page of information that includes the percentage of light transmitted by each filter.



    Be careful though, I tried it out with a Moddoolar triple head with XPG R4s and some filters can't take the heat too well and warp within a few seconds (on high, of course). The good thing is that they also have filters that are High Temperature grade.

    Try it, it's fun!


  3. #33

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    I just ordered two of the booklets to play with. They were pretty cheap.
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  4. #34
    Flashaholic* samuraishot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Diablo_331 View Post
    I just ordered two of the booklets to play with. They were pretty cheap.
    Did you use the discount code to get one for just a penny?

  5. #35

    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    7 bucks for two books shipped, nice.

    I use a calibration DVD to get my displays on the proper temps, called Avia Guide to Home Theatre or something like that, search Avia if it interests you. The DVD came with strips of filter that you hold up and match flashing bars within bars so the flashing bits vanish. Calibrated displays look odd at first, as most displays come with hugely overdone reds. Now with this Lee filter book I can dial out the blue in my XM-L lights and make em closer to pure white.
    I seem to have misplaced my occipital lobe, and as such cannot search for it. Do you see my dilemma?

  6. #36
    Flashaholic* Derek Dean's Avatar
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    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    I just got one of the $31 Fenix LD01 SS lights yesterday (what a nice deal from Tool Nut), and like everybody else mine had a greenish cyanish tint, but it only took me about half an hour to figure out the right filter, cut it to size, and stick it down over the front glass (the head is sealed).

    It's neat that if you're really careful and take your time you can cut the filter so that it doesn't even need any adhesive to stick to the glass. It just kind of sticks down in there against the sides.

    Now it's got a nice slightly creamy warm tint...... lovely.

  7. #37

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    Yea I used the discount code. I hope I can make these work.
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  8. #38
    Flashaholic* Derek Dean's Avatar
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    Default Re: I'm an LED tint snob!

    Quote Originally Posted by GaAslamp View Post
    Taking this quote slightly out of context , for one thing just flat-out saying that expanding the subject beyond the narrow scope you defined is unwelcome. If that is the case, then I will respect your wishes and refrain from commenting on anything outside of that scope in this thread.
    Sorry,I meant to respond to this earlier and got distracted.

    I see you're a new member (welcome by the way), so maybe you didn't realize , but we do try to stay on topic in these threads, otherwise they tend to ramble all over the place.

    I think it would be more appropriate if you were to include in your discussion, how to use the Lee Filter Swatch pack to achieve better color rendition with the various LEDs, and in particular precisely which filters you are using with which LEDs. OR, if it's even possible to use these filters to achieve near perfect color rendition, and at what cost in brightness.

    For instance, when I recently got my NiteCore IFE2 with an XP-G R5 cool white LED, I found that the filter from page 90 (a medium orange color) seemed to work best to give me excellent color rendition and a very slightly warm tint, AND I found that same filter worked best with my new Fenix LD01 SS XP-G R5 cool white LED as well!

    So, for folks having lights with an XP-G R5 cool white LED, you might use the filter found on page 90 as a starting point for your tests.

    Anyway, my intentions weren't to stop your discussion, but merely to steer it back towards the original topic of using filters.

  9. #39

    Default Re: I'm an LED tint snob!

    I received my two booklets today and have spend the last hour or so trying out different filters with my Peak Eiger. I found a few that I like but will take Derek Dean's advice and sleep on it until I start cutting. I also tried the filters with my SC51c and I didn't see anything that made it any better IMHO. Have you played around with your SC51c and the filters yet Derek Dean? I would really appreciate some feedback if so! Now I have an entire 96 hours to mess around with it some more.
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  10. #40

    Default Re: I'm an LED tint snob!

    Quote Originally Posted by GaAslamp View Post
    I understand that.



    Taking this quote slightly out of context , for one thing just flat-out saying that expanding the subject beyond the narrow scope you defined is unwelcome. If that is the case, then I will respect your wishes and refrain from commenting on anything outside of that scope in this thread.
    DEfinitely not, this thread was getting interesting!

  11. #41

    Default Re: I'm an LED tint snob!

    Personally, I don't mind whether a LED is warm white, cool white or neutral as long as it is bright enough to see by. My knowledge of the subject is very limited but I always understood the eye was very good at compensating for differences in lighting. Daylight under a clear sky is blueish due to the amount of blue in the sky, and shadows under a blue sky are very blue, but who actually 'sees' that? Bearing that in mind I don't see why a slightly blue LED should be the problem that it seems to be for a lot of people, unless you are doing some task that requires very detailed colour matching. Obviously I'm missing something. When walking the dog at night I don't mind if a tree looks a bit blue or even a bit yellow as long as I can see it!

  12. #42

    Default Re: I'm an LED tint snob!

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Dean View Post
    I see you're a new member (welcome by the way), so maybe you didn't realize , but we do try to stay on topic in these threads, otherwise they tend to ramble all over the place.

    I think it would be more appropriate if you were to include in your discussion, how to use the Lee Filter Swatch pack to achieve better color rendition with the various LEDs, and in particular precisely which filters you are using with which LEDs. OR, if it's even possible to use these filters to achieve near perfect color rendition, and at what cost in brightness.

    For instance, when I recently got my NiteCore IFE2 with an XP-G R5 cool white LED, I found that the filter from page 90 (a medium orange color) seemed to work , my intentions weren't to stop your discussion...
    Exactly. Here at cpf, we try to stay on topic. So let's everyone be sure to first & foremost state your light & the color you picked for it from the Lee Filter Swatch Pack® book (don't forget the page number!); but also much thanks to Derek Dean for allowing those guys a little latitude in your thread at the same time. You handled that graciously!


  13. #43

    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Dean View Post
    I just got one of the $31 Fenix LD01 SS lights yesterday (what a nice deal from Tool Nut), and like everybody else mine had a greenish cyanish tint, but it only took me about half an hour to figure out the right filter, cut it to size, and stick it down over the front glass (the head is sealed).

    It's neat that if you're really careful and take your time you can cut the filter so that it doesn't even need any adhesive to stick to the glass. It just kind of sticks down in there against the sides.

    Now it's got a nice slightly creamy warm tint...... lovely.
    Which filter did you use? I have a green LD01 too.
    Inova BLT-2A | Fenix LD20, LD01 | 4Sevens Quark 123 Reg, Quark RGB, ReVO SS, Preon I/II Al, MiNi CR2*3, Maelstrom X10 | Zebralight H31w, H600w | DQG Tiny II | Veleno Quantum D2

  14. #44
    Flashaholic* Derek Dean's Avatar
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    Default Re: I'm an LED tint snob!

    Quote Originally Posted by davecroft View Post
    Personally, I don't mind whether a LED is warm white, cool white or neutral as long as it is bright enough to see by. My knowledge of the subject is very limited but I always understood the eye was very good at compensating for differences in lighting. Daylight under a clear sky is blueish due to the amount of blue in the sky, and shadows under a blue sky are very blue, but who actually 'sees' that? Bearing that in mind I don't see why a slightly blue LED should be the problem that it seems to be for a lot of people, unless you are doing some task that requires very detailed color matching. Obviously I'm missing something. When walking the dog at night I don't mind if a tree looks a bit blue or even a bit yellow as long as I can see it!
    Howdy Dave and welcome to CPF. Yes, the eye (actually the brain) is VERY good at helping to compensate for the different colors of light we encounter every day, but there are those of us who, through experience, have become acutely aware of these different colors of light.

    I got my degree in photography and was a professional color printer for many years, so my eyes are finely tuned to notice those things. Before we had the automatic white balance found it today's digital cameras, we had to use a yellow filter to get rid of that extreme bluish light found in the shade, and we had to use a magenta filter to get rid of the greenish cast found under typical florescent lighting. So, I'm especially sensitive to tint, and while none of my lights had a "horrible" tint, I found that color correcting them gives me a more pleasant experience.

    It's one of those things you might not even notice until you see an unfiltered light next to a correctly filtered one, and all of a sudden you go "oh", and from then on you find that a more neutral tint is higher on your list of priorities when selecting a new light.

    What's neat is that now I don't have to delete a light from my list of candidates just because it doesn't have a neutral LED, because I know I can filter it when it arrives and get it close to my personal preference.

    As far as using LED lights outside, that's probably the primary reason you SHOULD consider using filters to color correct your light. When you shine a light with a noticeable cyanish or bluish tint on bushes, ground, or trees, you'll find the contrast much lower, and if you filter out that cyanish light, all of a sudden the colors become distinct with much higher contrast, hopefully making outdoor walking not only more enjoyable, but safer as well.

    However, if you're happy with your lights the way they are, that's fine. It's very possible your lights came with LEDs that already have good color rendering qualities. I'm not trying to convert anybody, I've just been reading lately how many folks have been unhappy with the tint of their lights and thought I would share this easy, inexpensive, and totally reversible method that I have found works so well for me.

    Mat, I used the filter on page 90 for my new Fenix SS LD01. Of course it is on the outside of the glass, so it will eventually get scratched up and might need to be replaced, but so far it's been in my pocket for a week and the filter still looks pristine. I don't mind replacing the filter occasionally if that's what it takes to get beautifully colored light from this neat little flashlight.

    The filter on page 90 would be a good place for you to start, but be sure and try LOTS of others. Often the differences can be subtle, which is why I like evaluating the light using soup can labels, or colorful books, etc. When you get the right filter the colors tend to look "right". Also, your idea of what's a good tint might be completely different from my idea of a good tint, so only use the page numbers as a starting point.

    Diablo_331, I don't have the Zebralight SC51c, so I can't comment on that, but the beam shots I've seen posted show it with excellent color rendering abilities as it is.

    Remember, if you are trying to get a "whiter" light, generally what you will be doing is FILTERING OUT the excessive or dominant color of the LED, and you do that by picking a filter that is the OPPOSITE color of the one you are trying to filter out.

    Here is a color wheel:
    http://www.colormatters.com/colortheory.html

    Just look at the wheel and find the color that closely matches the current tint of flashlight (the tint that you want to change or get rid of), then look at the opposite side of the wheel and that will show you the color that you should be starting with to get rid of the offending tint, although you will probably want to start with a lighter variation of that color, as the darker the filter, the more you will reduce the output of your light, so go with the lightest filter you can live with.

    So, if your light has a greenish color, then add a magenta filter. If your light has a cyanish color (green AND blue), then add a red or orange filter (which is magenta and yellow). If your light has an excessive yellow cast, add a blue filter. This will reduce that dominate color and provide a more balanced spectral output.

    The main mistake that most folks make, who are new to color correction, is that they tend to over correct. The easiest way to approach this is to NOT try to perfectly correct the tint, but just help it become closer to your ideal. Obviously the more time you spend playing with the filters, the better your chances of finding the right one, and giving your eyes a rest between sessions will help as well.

    Of course the great thing about this is that you can always go back and easily change to a different filter if you ever decide you want to.

    In any case, I'm glad to hear that you'all are experimenting with these filters, and I'll be interested to follow everybody's progress.

  15. #45
    Flashaholic* RedLed's Avatar
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    Default Re: I'm an LED tint snob!

    Guy's

    Please, just put the gel in front of the light on a white wall (And there are hundreds of shades of white) and pick the color you like best. You could use a White Card if you do not have white walls. We use these cards to set our color balance in the camera.

    Something to think about, in the real world things work different sometimes. I have been the set photographer for many motion pictures, and they light up multi million dollar scenes with a foam board.

    Once, I remember the lighting director holding up different color gels in front of the key light, and asking, how about that? the DP shrugged his shoulders, looks ok, and the director said great: ACTION! Then, CUT... wait, let's see the other one again...no forget it, marker, action!

    Let the LED manufacturers get the color temperature correct in the LED itself, this is always the best. Future LED color Temp. are only going to get better, and better.

    You can also try Rosco, they are the other company that makes Gel's, and both lee and Rosco offer more than one sample book. Go to a Grip Supply if your town happens has one.

    It is fun to use the Gel's on lights, I have been doing this since the 80's, when I was making my Mini Mag lights soft and red.

    Best,

    RL


    "The technical over complication of any type, or level of photography will most often take from the creative aspect of the project." --Ned Redway, Photographer
    Last edited by RedLed; 09-03-2011 at 04:52 PM.
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  16. #46

    Default Re: I'm an LED tint snob!

    Funny this wasn't brought up but what type of transparent glue are you guys using? If the cutout will slip into a grove in the bezel then that would be ideal IMHO but an easily removable glue would be great for my other torches. Anyone have any suggestions?
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  17. #47
    Flashaholic* Derek Dean's Avatar
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    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    Of course ideally you would want to remove the bezel and place the filter inside the glass, but if you can't get the bezel off and can't get the filter to stick in the groove on the outside of the glass, then I've used a tiny bit of glue from a Scotch Restickable Adhesive Glue stick, just around the edges. It holds well, but is easily removable and cleans off leaving no residue if you change your mind.
    Last edited by Derek Dean; 09-03-2011 at 11:26 PM.

  18. #48
    Flashaholic goldenlight's Avatar
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    Party Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Dean View Post
    Ok, I'll admit it, I've become a tint snob, and I used to agonize while waiting for a new light as to what tint the LED would be, but no more.

    I've now found the joy of customizing the tint on all of my lights to EXACTLY the tint I want thanks to the Lee Filter Swatch Book, which can be found here:
    http://www.shop.leefiltersusa.com/Sw...2.qscstrfrnt02

    This little book contains hundreds of different colored filters, from light magenta to dark magenta, or light blue to dark blue, or light yellow to dark yellow, etc. It even contains diffusing filters!

    Each plastic filter is about 1 1/2" x 2 1/2". It can take a little time to find the right filter because there are so many colors to choose from, but it's honestly a lot of fun and not all that hard.

    If your light has a greenish tint, then you'll probably want one of the pink (magenta) filters, while I found the XP-G R5 LED in my new NiteCore IFE2 (which seem to be more of a cyan, or green-blue tint) needed a light orange filter.

    Each filter has a number. All you do is just hold each filter in front of the light and write down the numbers of the filters that seem to work well, and then after narrowing it down to 3 or 4, you finally pick the one that gives you the perfect tint.

    What's the perfect tint? Well, not only did I use a white wall, but I would aim the light at a bookcase with lots of colorful books, and I went into the kitchen and aimed it at soup cans, etc. Then I went outside and looked at plants. I couldn't believe how much better colors looked when rendered with the correct filter in front of the light. AMAZING.

    When you finally select the right filter, you'll want to cut out a small square of that filter about the size of the front glass cover. If you can get the bezel off of your light, you can simply remove it and place the glass on the plastic filter and trace around it with a pen and cut to size, then place the filter inside the glass front cover and reassemble (filter, glass, bezel)

    On lights that I can't remove the bezel, I simply place the light, bezel down, on the filter and trace around it and cut it out, then taking my time, I'll begin trimming it until it fits down into the bezel area on top of the glass cover. Then I'll attach it using a reversible glue stick, and have found that it stays in place great. On my Jetbeam Bk-135A I didn't even have to use the glue stick, when I got it cut to size, I placed it down on the glass and it slid into place in a small groove. Neat!

    The difference it makes in the quality of the light is dramatic, and usually with only a very small loss in light output, which is more than made up by having such a beautiful tint.

    I can't recommend this enough. Now, every time I use one of my lights I really enjoy the quality of the light as much as the physical aspects of the light itself.

    So, rather than complaining about green or blue tints, customize every light you own with this simple, inexpensive, and easily reversible solution.
    I used the Lee filter pack, and the removeable glue on 2 of my lights that had a fairly green tint, and I can't BELIEVE what a HUGE difference it has made.

    I greatly prefer the 'cool' tint light, and ESPECIALLY if there is a little bit of blue in the tint.

    Now, two lights that i only occasionally used, have the *perfect* tint....for me, at least!

    Thanks, Derek Dean!

  19. #49

    Default Re: I'm an LED tint snob!

    Quote Originally Posted by davecroft View Post
    My knowledge of the subject is very limited but I always understood the eye was very good at compensating for differences in lighting.
    Well, kind of. The eye can compensate to a point, but if the light source isn't bringing out the color, your eye isn't going to see it. For instance, a cool white emitter shined on a bush will, in general, make all the leaves look varying shades of green while a warm high CRI emitter will show that the leaves are, in fact, varying shades of green, yellow, and brown. I've found that I prefer the latter for reasons that I can't readily explain.
    Last edited by the.Mtn.Man; 09-09-2011 at 08:51 PM.

  20. #50

    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    Thanks Derek Dean. I just placed an order for the swatch book. This should be interesting.

  21. #51
    Flashaholic* Derek Dean's Avatar
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    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    Quote Originally Posted by goldenlight View Post
    I used the Lee filter pack, and the removeable glue on 2 of my lights that had a fairly green tint, and I can't BELIEVE what a HUGE difference it has made.
    Thanks for posting your experience, goldenlight. I was beginning to think I was just imagining how good my lights look now .

    I wish I could take the credit for this, but using filters was being discussed on CPF long before I got here. In any case, I'm glad to hear that somebody else is having success with color correcting their lights using these filters.

  22. #52

    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    I just ordered a book of filters to try and salvage the cool white HDS Rotary I recently ordered. I love the design of the light itself, but I'm a bit put off by the tint, especially when comparing it to my high CRI Ra Clicky. If I could get the Rotary a nice creamy neutral white then I think I would be very happy with it. At the very least, I don't want my kids looking cyanotic when I check on them at night.
    Last edited by the.Mtn.Man; 09-10-2011 at 07:10 AM.

  23. #53

    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    Double post
    Last edited by the.Mtn.Man; 09-10-2011 at 07:10 AM.

  24. #54
    Flashaholic* Hondo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    No kidding, I had read about these many times, but you finally got me to try them over in the LD01 thread. Not only did these rescue that light, but my shelf-bound Ti Quarks with the same green XP-G's are now some of the best tints I have. Starting to find filters to "neutralize" just plain cool tint lights now, and will probably order some more filters, although they go a long way because every light seems to need a bit different filter to get what you want. Since they are starting from a different point, so there is not one "best" filter color to get what you want from different lights. Like you said, if it's green, you want more red content in the filter. A pure cool white will come out too pink with a filter that works good on a greenish light.

    I do notice what appears to be a significant loss of brightness, which I believe is a combination of actual loss of lumens as the filter removes some of the wavelengths, as well as the subjective factor that cool tints appear brighter to the eye, even at the same lumen level. I really don't think the loss is much different than what you would see by switching to a neutral emitter in a lower flux bin. You are either filtering it at the die or at the lens. After all, the light starts out as blue from the die.

    Thanks again for pushing me over the edge on these, Derek!

  25. #55
    Flashaholic* Derek Dean's Avatar
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    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    Quote Originally Posted by Hondo View Post
    I do notice what appears to be a significant loss of brightness, which I believe is a combination of actual loss of lumens as the filter removes some of the wavelengths, as well as the subjective factor that cool tints appear brighter to the eye, even at the same lumen level. I really don't think the loss is much different than what you would see by switching to a neutral emitter in a lower flux bin. You are either filtering it at the die or at the lens. After all, the light starts out as blue from the die.
    Yep, I imagine that if you were to look at a spectral analysis graph of each LED, you'd see a spike in the region of the dominant color, and it's that spike, which is excess light in that wavelength, which we are trying to diminish, so yes, we are certainly removing light with this method, trying to make that graph look more flat.

    Of course how much the light level is reduced is dependent on how dark the filter is, and since the Lee Filter Swatch pack has quite a few different levels of filter, from lighter to darker, for each color, we can control how much correction we use and find the best balance between correction and light loss for each situation.

    It would be helpful if you could post what number filters you are using for which lights and LEDs, just to see if we can find a general pattern, and help other folks have a better idea of where to start.

    I really am happy to hear of these success stories. Thanks!

  26. #56

    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    I have a Jetbean BC40 that is just a tickle on the blue side of things. Not enough to worry about UNTIL a neutral emitter gets fired up next to it. Then it looks sickly blue. I tried lots of varying colors from the filter pack and the very second I placed "159 NO COLOUR STRAW" in front of the lens I knew it was right. The light lost all hints of blue and picked up the tiniest bit of yellow, only noticeable on a white wall.

    I also decided to see if I could make the flood on my ZL SC30 better. "251 QUARTER WHITE DIFFUSION" totally kills the hotspot and creates a huge ball of even light. Perfect for a headlamp and close up work. The light output across the whole head becomes very even and light loss is kept low. This might end up being a permanent mod for the ZL.

    This little filter pack is great fun to mess with. Considering popping the plastic rivet and placing the filters in an old CD case to make selection easier. The current book style is sort of hard to handle.
    I seem to have misplaced my occipital lobe, and as such cannot search for it. Do you see my dilemma?

  27. #57
    Flashaholic* Hondo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    Quote Originally Posted by Derek Dean View Post
    It would be helpful if you could post what number filters you are using for which lights and LEDs, just to see if we can find a general pattern, and help other folks have a better idea of where to start.
    Good idea! I first tried 506 Marlene in my greenish LD01, but decided I was still seeing too much green, and switched it to 775 Soft Amber. This is very deep in the neutral range, but I like it. I used 774 Soft Amber for my Ti Quark with the same type of emitter, and this is enough to eliminate the green, but with a bit higher color temp., but still very neutral. 774 has less red, so the LD01 must have a bit greener emitter. Putting 774 in front of a pure cool white makes it look fairly pink compared to other lights, but not really bad on it's own. I am thinking of using 009 Pale Gold in some of those. Some cool whites that never appeared green to me do actually look better with the 774, though. To be honest, if I don't turn on a bunch of lights at once, many of the filters in this range make any stark, cold tint look much nicer. Some are more to the yellow side, others to the pink, but I like them all better than cold pure white.

    I'm with brembo on getting these out of the flip book format to make it easier to experiment.

    Edit: Hey, I just noticed you referring to page numbers, like 90 for the one you used on your LD01. I have numbers on the info cards, but they are totally random, not in any kind of order at all. Did there used to also be sequential page numbers in the book? And what color is on your page 90?
    Last edited by Hondo; 09-11-2011 at 11:02 AM.

  28. #58
    Flashaholic* Derek Dean's Avatar
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    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    Hondo, yes... I've had this filter book for 4-5 years, and it has all the filters numbered sequentially, but it does also list a random number and name:

    NiteCore IFE2 (XP-G R5) 162 Bastard Amber
    Jetbeam BK-135a (XP-G R4) 154 Pale Rose
    Fenix LD01 SS (XP-G R5) 154 Pale Rose


  29. #59

    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    I got my filter pack today and settled on 506 (marlene) for my HDS Rotary. It takes the blue edge off the light without making it overly warm. It's not quite high CRI, but it's definitely an improvement.

    I had considered removing the bezel and mounting the filter under the lens for a more permanent installation, but I was worried that the heat from the LED would cause the filter to warp or wrinkle. What has been people's experience with this?

  30. #60
    Flashaholic* Derek Dean's Avatar
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    Default Re: Changing LED Tint With Filters

    Mtn.Man, I've got the amber filter mounted inside the front cover of my NiteCore IFE2 (on the left in the photo above), and it's shown no signs of warpage to date, and that light has 350 emitter lumens on max. output (270 OTF).

    I did read a post earlier in this thread where somebody had an issue mounting it inside a light with a high power XML (or was it 3 XMLs?).

    And just for the record, both my LD01 SS and Fenix Bk-135a have the filters mounted on the outside, and even though both lights are with me constantly the filters still look pristine, maybe because the diameter of the opening is so small.

    In any case, I think you'd be ok mounting the filter inside your HDS. It's easy, just cut it the same size as the glass cover (measure after you've removed the glass from the light). You won't need any adhesive, just put the filter down on top of the reflector, then the glass, then the bezel.

    Of course, the issue that might arise from this procedure is getting some dust inside on the reflector, filter, or glass. I turned off any fans and used a sponge to damp down the area I was working in, then proceeded carefully, and had no trouble, but it's something to think about.
    Last edited by Derek Dean; 09-15-2011 at 01:12 AM.

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