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Thread: Thrunite TN10 & TN11 Review (XM-L - 1x18650, 2xCR123A): RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOTS +

  1. #1

    Wink2 Thrunite TN10 & TN11 Review (XM-L - 1x18650, 2xCR123A): RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOTS +

    Warning: pic heavy, as usual.




    The TN10 and TN11 are general-purpose 1x18650/2xCR123A lights from Thrunite – similar in features to the Thrunite Scorpion V2, but with a revised switching-control interface. Let's see how they measure up …

    Common Manufacturer Specifications:
    • LED: Cree XM-L LED T6
    • Rated operation voltage 2.7v to12v
    • Crenellated SS bezel
    • Removable SS clip
    • Copper base plate for more efficient heat
    • Shiny smooth reflector
    • Impact resistance:1.2m
    • Waterproof to IPX-8 standard
    • Made of durable aircraft grade aluminum
    • Premium Type III hard-anodized anti-abrasive finish
    • Toughened ultra-clear glass lens with anti-reflective coating
    • Battery reverse protection function. And batteries low indication (it will flash when voltage down to 2.7v)
    • Mode selection: tighten→loosen→tighten within 2 secs to ramp the output from firefly mode→infinite brightness (from 5% to 89%)→slow strobe→quick strobe. You can select any of the modes by screwing the body tight and loosening within 0.5 secs.
    TN10
    • Use one 1x18650 or 2xCR123A batteries
    • Max light output:650lumens.When using 2xCR123A or 3x or 4xCR123A or 2x18650 rechargeable batteries. 2.5A current for 4 minutes and then down to 2.2A (extended tube is not included in the package)
    • Max runtime: 706hours (0.2 lumens)
    • Runtime: 98 minute for 1x18650 (2600mAh) down to 50%. 50minutes down to 50% (2xCR123A )
    • Max beam distance: 245m
    • Peak beam intensity: 21348cd
    • 148mm (length) x 35mm (bezel diameter), 25.4mm (Body diameter)
    • Weight: 145g (without battery)
    • MSRP: ~$90
    TN11
    • Use one 1x18650, 2xCR123A batteries or 3xCR123A (one extender tube included)
    • Max light output: 830lumens.When using 3x or 4xCR123A or 2x18650 rechargeable batteries.
    • Max output for 10 minutes and then down to 85% (one extended tube is included in the package, an additional extended tube is needed for using 4xCR123A or 2x18650 batteries)
    • Max runtime: 745hours (0.2 lumens)
    • Runtime: 75 minute for 1x18650 (2600mAh) down to 50%. 47minutes down to 50% (3xCR123A )
    • Max beam distance: 355m
    • Peak beam intensity: 28900cd
    • 154mm (length) x 41mm (bezel diameter), 25.4mm (Body diameter)
    • Weight: 165g ( without battery)
    • MSRP: ~$105




    Packaging includes a good number of extras in both cases – along with the light, you get a decent quality holster and wrist lanyard, extra o-rings, stainless steel clip, anodized aluminum grip ring (attached but removable), 2xCR123A battery plastic tube (to prevent rattle), and manual. With the TN11, you also get one 1xCR123A-length body tube extender included.




    From left to right: Redilast protected 18650; Thrunite Scorpion V2 Turbo, TN11, TN10, TN12; NiteCore IFE2; Lumintop ED20; 4Sevens Quark 123-2 X.

    All dimensions are given with no batteries installed:

    TN10: Weight: 154.7g, Length: 145.5mm, Width (bezel): 35.1mm
    TN11: Weight: 176.8g, Length: 154.0mm, Width (bezel): 41.0mm
    TN12: Weight: 64.0g, Length: 126.9mm, Width (bezel): 24.1mm
    Scorpion V2: Weight: 171.2g, Length: 168mm, Width: 35.0 (bezel), 37.0mm (tailcap grip ring)
    Scorpion V2 with Turbo Head: Weight: 188.3g, Length: 171mm, Width: 41.0 (bezel), 37.0mm (tailcap grip ring)

    As you can see, the TN10 bezel diameter exactly matches the Scorpion V2 (standard head), and the TN11 exactly matches the Scorpion V2 Turbo. In fact, the lights seem to use the same reflectors as those earlier models.

    Overall length is lower on the TN10/11, due to now-standard size tailcap.





    Note: The TN10 and TN11 share an identical body and tailcap – only the head is different (although threading diameter is the same). Body tube extenders thus work fine on either model.

    While overall build and dimensions seem fairly typical for this class light, build is distinctive for the fluted ridges along the tailcap, body tube and head. These are fairly sharped-edged, and provide surprisingly good grip (although they can also be sore on the hands if you are doing a lot of repeated twisting). There is no knurling per se.

    Anodizing is glossy black. Labels are bright white against the black background.

    Lights can tailstand, but are quite wobbly if not clicked on.

    Lights have a slightly beveled stainless steel bezel ring

    Lights use high quality square-cut screw threads, anodized for lock-out.

    Body tube extenders can be combined to add support for multiple battery formats. However, I found you had to crank the extenders on tight for them to make contact on my samples.

    User Interface

    The lights use a forward clicky switch for on/off, and head twists for mode control. Press and hold the clicky for momentary, press and release for constant on (i.e. click on).

    Mode switching is controlled by twisting the head. With the head tight against the body, you get Max output. Loosen the head for the user-controlled setting.

    To set the user-controlled setting, do a rapid tighten-loosen-tighten-loosen double-switch (from loose) within two secs. The light will now ramp through its output modes, starting with Firefly (pause of ~2 secs), a ramp from Lo to Max (~7 secs) with a double-flash to let you know you have reached max, a slow strobe (~4 secs) and a fast strobe (~2 secs) before starting over at Firefly, in a repeating loop. To select the mode you want, do a tighten-loosen switch in under half a second.

    I found selecting a mode to be somewhat inconsistent on both my TN10 & TN11 samples. Sometimes a tighten-loosen select at the level I wanted caused it to restart the ramp (i.e. acted as a double-switch), other times it caused it to return to the previously memorized set mode (i.e. acted like it cancelled the double-switch ramp). Not sure the source of the issue, but I found the variableness frustrating at times.

    Here's a comparison of the continuous output ramp – you'll see the actual continuously-variable ramping pattern is very similar to the Thrunite Scorpion V2. Note I am not showing the strobe sequences on the ramp below:



    For a more detailed examination of the build and user interface, please see my video overview:



    Video was recorded in 720p, but YouTube defaults to 360p. Once the video is running, you can click on the 360p icon in the lower right-hand corner, and select the higher 480p to 720p options, or even run full-screen.

    PWM/Strobe

    Like the Thrunite Scorpion V2, there is no sign of PWM that I can see, at any output level. Either they are using a frequency that is too high for me to detect, or the light is actually current-controlled as claimed.





    Slow strobe was measured at 4.8 Hz, fast strobe at 9.5 Hz. I would prefer an ever slower strobe for signaling purposes – something around 2-3 Hz would be plenty.

    Beamshots:





    As mentioned above, the TN10 seems to use the same reflector as the standard Scorpion V2, and the TN11 uses the same reflector as the V2 Turbo. The reflectors have a smooth finish, both with Cool White XM-L emitters. Emitters were reasonably well centered on my samples, but not necessarily perfectly centered.

    For white-wall beamshots, all lights are on 1x18650, about ~0.75 meter from a white wall (with the camera ~1.25 meters back from the wall). Automatic white balance on the camera, to minimize tint differences.













    And now for the outdoor shots. These beamshots were done in the style of my earlier 100-yard round-up review. Please see that thread for a discussion of the topography (i.e. the road dips in the distance, to better show you the corona in the mid-ground).In this case, I have used the S65, since greater output is needed at a distance.





    For all intents and purposes, you can consider the TN10 to have the same beam profile as the standard Scorpion V2, and the TN11 is the same as the Scorpion V2 Turbo.

    Testing Method:

    All my output numbers are relative for my home-made light box setup, a la Quickbeam's flashlightreviews.com method. You can directly compare all my relative output values from different reviews - i.e. an output value of "10" in one graph is the same as "10" in another. All runtimes are done under a cooling fan, except for any extended run Lo/Min modes (i.e. >12 hours) which are done without cooling.

    I have recently devised a method for converting my lightbox relative output values (ROV) to estimated Lumens. See my How to convert Selfbuilt's Lighbox values to Lumens thread for more info.

    Throw/Output Summary Chart:

    My summary tables are reported in a manner consistent with the ANSI FL-1 standard for flashlight testing. Please see http://www.sliderule.ca/FL1.htm for a description of the terms used in these tables.







    Note: The Min estimated lumen values are based on Firefly mode in the table above. The number in (brackets) is the lowest output level I detected on the continuously-variable ramp.

    Although the TN10 has slightly lower output than the TN11 on 1x18650, on 2x sources the lights have similar output (which is comparable to the Scorpion V2). Note this is different from the specifications, which report the TN10 as having a consistently lower output on all battery sources.

    Output/Runtime Comparison:

    First, a direct comparison of Thrunite models on 1x18650



    My TN10 sample suffered from some sort of flickering on 1x18650 (not apparent on 2x sources, so I am not sure of the source of the problem). It also start flashing a low-battery warning relatively early into the 1x18650 run (i.e. almost half-way into the runs, as shown by the wider swings on the runtime traces above).

    The TN11 certainly seems to have an identical circuit to the Scorpion V2.










    On 2x sources, there is less to distinguish the TN10 and TN11 – both had equivalent initial outputs (despite what the specs report). The difference is how soon the samples step-down – my TN10 stepped down at around 3 mins, my TN11 stepped down at around 10 mins. This of course affects overall runtimes – but the TN10/TN11 are certainly well in keeping with other high-output lights on 2x sources.

    Note that 10 mins at these Max levels may be longer than some primary CR123A cells can stand before tripping their built-in PTC circuits. See a discussion of this issue here, based on the Scorpion V2.

    As you can also see above, my TN10 sample began flashing a low battery warning on 2xCR123A shortly after it fell out of regulation.

    Potential Issues

    There was some inconsistency in mode setting on both my samples (i.e. tighten-loosen only correctly set the user-defined mode about half the time in my testing).

    My TN10 sample had some flickering on 1x18650, and an early trigger for the low battery warning halfway through the 1x18650 and 2xCR123A runs. On 2x battery sources, output was higher than spec (and comparable to the TN11 and Scorpion V2).

    The introduction of the step-down feature on 2x sources is welcomed, although there is variability in the length of time before step-down occurred between samples (i.e. 3 mins on the TN10, 10 mins on the TN11). The delayed step-down on my TN11 sample may be an issue for primary CR123A batteries (i.e. potentially triggering PTC circuits due to excessive heat – see discussion of the Scorpion V2). Personally, I do not recommend running 2xCR123A lights at these sorts of Max output levels for longer than ~5 mins without automatic step-down, or manual lowering of output.

    I find the fluted ridges along the length of the lights to have relatively sharp edges, making handling potentially uncomfortable during repeated switching maneuvers. However, grip is better than expected.

    Battery extender tubes required a fair bit of force to screw down fully (and were subsequently difficult to remove, given the complete lack of grip elements along their length).

    The switch retaining ring in the tailcap can easily loosen up with repeated battery changes, leading to incomplete activation (common symptom: light only works in momentary mode, or not at all). To tighten, just bend a paper-clip open, and insert the free end into one of the two small holes on the white-plastic retaining ring in the tailcap. Turn counter-clockwise to tighten. This issue is not specific to TN-series lights, and is actually quite common across makes and models (although I did observe it on both TN samples, eventually).

    It is nice that Thrunite has offered the option of two strobe modes, but I would have preferred a slower slow (i.e. currently only 5 Hz or 9.5 Hz choices).

    Preliminary Observations

    To sum up: the TN10 and TN11 appear to be revised general-purpose versions of the Scorpion V2 and V2 Turbo, respectively. The circuit performance and overall feature sets are very similar (although with a few new features, see below). The main difference is in the control interface (i.e. simple head-twists on the TN-series lights, as opposed to the more complicated tailcap of the Scorpion).

    That said, there are a few other differences between the lights. The build is obviously different from the Scorpions, as the TN-series lights are using a new type of styling. The sharp-edge fluted ridges along the length are distinctive, and provide considerable grip (although I personally still prefer standard knurling). Extra battery tube extenders are also a thoughtful idea.

    In principle, I like the new control interface. It is quite versatile and straight-forward – in fact, it reminds me a bit of the original Nitecore Defender Infinity and original ITP C-series lights. However, both my TN samples frequently responded unexpectedly when trying to save the setting (i.e. often cancelling the ramp and returning to the previous setting, or re-starting the ramp, rather than saving the desired setting).

    Another change from the Scorpion V2 is the new step-down feature when running on Max on 2x battery sources. This is a thoughtful safety feature, as sustained runtime at these levels could trigger the built-in PTC thermal safety circuits on primary CR123As (see discussion of the Scorpion V2 here). That said, I don't understand the why the TN11 steps-down much later than the TN10, for the same drive level (i.e. 10 mins vs 3 mins). In any case, I personally recommend you don't run 2xCR123A longer than ~5 mins at these sorts of drive-levels.

    UPDATE: Thrunite has responded to me that the TN10 is intended primarily for 1x18650 operation, so they defined the max output as 3 mins. For the TN11, which includes a battery extender, they expect multi-cell operation, and so left it at a longer 10 mins of max output.

    Aside from this minor circuit difference, the main differences between the TN10 and TN11 are the throw (further on the TN11) and Max output on 1x18650 (higher on the TN11). In all other regards, they seem largely comparable (including in output on 2x battery sources).

    I like the inclusion of dual slow/fast strobes on the TN-series lights (although would have preferred an even slower slow). I have personally found it frustrating that most manufacturers only include disorienting fast "tactical" strobes on their lights, when what the vast majority of regular users need is a slow signaling strobe/beacon. It's not like we are all taking down charging rhinos here. So at the very least, the TN-series slow strobe is a step in the right direction.

    I appreciate the effort here to translate and update the excellent performance and feature set of the Scorpion V2 into a more general-purpose build. The TN10 and TN11 are a thoughtful addition to the 1x18650/2xCR123A class of lights.

    ----

    TN10 and TN11 supplied by Thrunite for review.
    Last edited by selfbuilt; 11-24-2011 at 05:46 PM.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Outdoor 100-yard Beamshots 2011. Latest: Skilhunt K26.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Thrunite TN10 & TN11 Review (XM-L - 1x18650, 2xCR123A): RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOT

    Thanks for another great review!!!


    NP

  3. #3

    Default Re: Thrunite TN10 & TN11 Review (XM-L - 1x18650, 2xCR123A): RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOT

    Thanks for the great review! I too have about 50% success in programming my TN11. The other half of the time it reverts to the last saved setting. I had to send it back to Light Junction after owning it for 13 days.

    I didn't send it back because of the difficulty in programming. I sent it back because it stopped working. I carefully cleaned all the threads and contact surfaces and still it only lights up momentarily while fully depressing (with force) the tail switch. Once the switch rises to either the on or off position I get nothing. If I manually connect the negative end of the cell with the unanodized portion of the body, the light operates correctly. This leads me to believe that the problem is in the tail switch. Anyway, I already sent it back to LJ. They tried to tell me that my Redilast 2900 may not be supported. We'll see what they say.

  4. #4
    Flashaholic CamoNinja's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN10 & TN11 Review (XM-L - 1x18650, 2xCR123A): RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOT

    Great review. Thanks.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Thrunite TN10 & TN11 Review (XM-L - 1x18650, 2xCR123A): RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOT

    Quote Originally Posted by Toobuzz View Post
    I too have about 50% success in programming my TN11. The other half of the time it reverts to the last saved setting. ... I sent it back because it stopped working. I carefully cleaned all the threads and contact surfaces and still it only lights up momentarily while fully depressing (with force) the tail switch. Once the switch rises to either the on or off position I get nothing. If I manually connect the negative end of the cell with the unanodized portion of the body, the light operates correctly. This leads me to believe that the problem is in the tail switch. Anyway, I already sent it back to LJ. They tried to tell me that my Redilast 2900 may not be supported. We'll see what they say.
    Sorry to hear you also experienced the problem setting the user-defined mode. I wonder how common this is?

    But as to the tailcap issue, the same happened on one of mine as well - it is due to the switch retaining ring in the tailcap loosening up. I discuss this a bit in the video, but I will also go back and add it to the text. The solution is easy - just bend a paper-clip open, and insert the free end into one of the two small holes on the white-plastic retaining ring. Turn counter-clockwise to tighten.

    This is actually the source of a lot of flashlight "failures" (and not just on these TN-series lights). The rings can easily loosen up with time, due to all the battery changes. The behaviour you describe is exactly what commonly occurs (i.e. only get a signal on momentary).
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Outdoor 100-yard Beamshots 2011. Latest: Skilhunt K26.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

  6. #6
    Flashaholic CamoNinja's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN10 & TN11 Review (XM-L - 1x18650, 2xCR123A): RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOT

    Selfbuilt, to your eyes is there any difference between the Scorpion V2 and the TN11 ?

    Thanks

  7. #7

    Default Re: Thrunite TN10 & TN11 Review (XM-L - 1x18650, 2xCR123A): RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOT

    Thanks selfbuilt! I'm so glad to see videos as part of your reviews now.

    Quote Originally Posted by selfbuilt View Post
    Sorry to hear you also experienced the problem setting the user-defined mode. I wonder how common this is?

    But as to the tailcap issue, the same happened on one of mine as well - it is due to the switch retaining ring in the tailcap loosening up. I discuss this a bit in the video, but I will also go back and add it to the text. The solution is easy - just bend a paper-clip open, and insert the free end into one of the two small holes on the white-plastic retaining ring. Turn counter-clockwise to tighten.

    This is actually the source of a lot of flashlight "failures" (and not just on these TN-series lights). The rings can easily loosen up with time, due to all the battery changes. The behaviour you describe is exactly what commonly occurs (i.e. only get a signal on momentary).
    I was able to resolve the accidental entry into programming mode mode by quickly switching the light off, loosen or tighten the bezel, then turn the light back on. Or, if your showing off the light to someone or just playing around with it, just use momentary so you can simply release your thumb - move the bezel - and press on again.

    As for my tailcap issue, I didn't want to go voiding any warranties, at least within the first two weeks of ownership. I emailed LJ a link to our discussion. Hopefully I'll get my TN11 back soon.

  8. #8
    Enlightened
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN10 & TN11 Review (XM-L - 1x18650, 2xCR123A): RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOT

    I had also some problems with the programming with my TN11, I had also problems with the full mode flickering and behaving weird, like it would be shortcutted. I figured out, that the threads on the head side have to be completely clean, then the flashlight behaves without issues. But as I don´t like very much dry threads, I tried today put there some WD40, and it works as well. I tried some other lubricants, but they all didn´t work for this light, it was a bit crazy. Now the light operates as it should. I only have to think when I´m loosing the head for second mode to do it quick, as sometimes the light comes to the programming mode just after one tighten-loosen, it acts as I would do it twice. There could be some filter in the driver to remove such very quick head mooves, but there are also other brands which have the same.
    Last edited by Stanley_BA; 11-23-2011 at 03:47 PM.
    EagleTac M3C4 3x XR-E NW // Spark SX5 + XM-L2 T6 3A + Battery Holder 4x18650 // Spark SG5 + XM-L2 T6 3A // Xeno Tiger F7 + XM-L2 T6 3C // Nitecore TM11 + XM-L2 T6 3A

  9. #9

    Default Re: Thrunite TN10 & TN11 Review (XM-L - 1x18650, 2xCR123A): RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOT

    Quote Originally Posted by CamoNinja View Post
    Selfbuilt, to your eyes is there any difference between the Scorpion V2 and the TN11 ?
    Not really, The hotspot seems slightly less tightly focused on my TN11 sample, but that is presumably just natural variation between individuals samples (i.e., centering of the emitter, height of the reflector, etc. all vary slightly from one sample to the next). The reflector seems to be the same, and the lights are driven to identical output levels.

    Quote Originally Posted by Toobuzz View Post
    As for my tailcap issue, I didn't want to go voiding any warranties, at least within the first two weeks of ownership. I emailed LJ a link to our discussion. Hopefully I'll get my TN11 back soon.
    Not to worry - tightening the tailcap switch retaining ring is considered regular maintenance. It can be required on a lot of lights.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stanley_BA View Post
    I figured out, that the threads on the head side have to be completely clean, then the flashlight behaves without issues. But as I don´t like very much dry threads, I tried today put there some WD40, and it works as well.
    Yes, I found cleaning the threads helped, but didn't fully resolve the issue. Lubricants on the threads can indeed lead to aberrant behavior, when mode selection requires multiple twisting/switching. BTW, I wouldn't recommend WD40 - it is a solvent, not a lubricant (which is presumably why it worked for you - it removed traces of the lube!). I don't know what effect it would have on o-rings, but I doubt it would be good. High percentage alcohol (e.g. 90%) is probably best for cleaning.

    I only have to think when I´m loosing the head for second mode to do it quick, as sometimes the light comes to the programming mode just after one tighten-loosen, it acts as I would do it twice.
    Yes, I have observed the same - some times, the light comes on into programming mode with only one tighten-loosen cycle. Cleaning had no effect on this behaviour.
    Last edited by selfbuilt; 11-23-2011 at 05:02 PM.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Outdoor 100-yard Beamshots 2011. Latest: Skilhunt K26.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Thrunite TN10 & TN11 Review (XM-L - 1x18650, 2xCR123A): RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOT

    I have the same problems with user-defined mode and tail-cap, the tail-cap can be fixed using the suggestion from Selfbuild. It really hard for TN11 to memorizes a desire level, flaw design ?.
    However, the beam profile is clean and smooth with no noticeable artifacts, really nice beam.

  11. #11
    Flashaholic*
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN10 & TN11 Review (XM-L - 1x18650, 2xCR123A): RUNTIMES, VIDEO, BEAMSHOT

    Let me first say I am a big Thrunite fan and own and have owned a number of their lights. The big problem I see is a very high and unrealistic candela rating from Thrunite's specs. 28,900 candela is in DBS with XR-E territory. We know that ain't gonna happen here. I knew that the XM-L was never going to make those kind of numbers in smaller reflectors. So what are they using to come up with this, it doesn't line up with ANSI testing. Your tests show 18,600 candela which is good but still not close to Thrunite spec. I would say these are not being measured by a 3rd party and I would have to guess that Thrunite's lux meter is either not calibrated or faulty. Anybody else notice this glaring candela/throw rating problem?

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