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Thread: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

  1. #1

    Question Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    Hi guys,

    I can't decide between these two bulbs: Philips Blue Vision and the Philips X-Treme Vision I currently have standard OEM bulbs and find the lighting to the sides less than adequate. I love the slight blue tinge of Xenon's and I really like the projected light colour. What I don't want is a bulb which isn't as good as my stock ones - or one that is going to fail fast. Does anyone have experience with both of these? Philips don't seem to be providing me with the life expectancy, I am after a year of day to day normal use minimum really.

    Many thanks,

    Laurence
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  2. #2
    Flashaholic* mvyrmnd's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    The simple truth here is that the X-treme visions are the better bulb.

    In order to lift the CCT of the Bluevisions, Philips have applied a filter to the bulb (the blue coating on the glass) This cuts out some of the lower frequency light coming out of the bulb. This means you are sacrificing output for tint.

    If you want the highest output, go for the X-treme bulbs. If you want your car to look cool to passers by (in some people's opinion, anyway) but not be able to see as well, go for the bluevisions.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    Thanks for the speedy reply.

    I understand that the bluevisions still are meant to have "30%" more light than standard bulbs - if so that should be all I need .

    The X-Treme bulbs sound very nice too, they sound very safe.


    As you say about the blue coating - I presume this increases the lamp heat and therefore life?
    LED Lenser P7
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    Both Eneloop powered

  4. #4

    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    The blue coating reduces the amount of light reaching the road, and there is no real benefit in exchange. The tinted light looks different, but does not help you see better. It certainly is not 30% brighter (or any % brighter) than standard bulbs, and its lifespan is short -- again with no benefit in exchange. Get the Xtreme Power or Xtreme Vision bulbs.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    Many thanks, my thought was that the whiter looking beam would illiminate with better visibility - but I guess the brighter beam of the xtreme out does that by the sounds of it .


    Is the Philips x-treme the one that people on here would recommend?


    Cheers
    LED Lenser P7
    Laserware green 5mW laser pointer
    Both Eneloop powered

  6. #6

    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    Quote Originally Posted by LaurenceGough View Post
    Many thanks, my thought was that the whiter looking beam would illiminate with better visibility - but I guess the brighter beam of the xtreme out does that by the sounds of it .


    Is the Philips x-treme the one that people on here would recommend?


    Cheers

    Yes, yes and yes...blue bulbs are worthless. Just say no.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    The other day, we happened on a demonstration of the silly blue=brighter & whiter myth: Returning home with the Grand Cherokee, I happened to look up at the motion sensor light on the house - two white PAR38 floods. Raising my eyes slightly to see them through the tinting on the top of the windshield, I perceived them to get "whiter," and if I hadn't known better there might have been the illusion that they became somehow "brighter." I pointed it out to my wife. In fact, the tinting on the top of the windshield is there specifically to reduce light, and it does. But as my line of sight shifted into the tinted area, and the actual light reaching my eyes was reduced, it somehow seemed "whiter."

    Since I know human eyes do better with yellow-white than blue-white, and I know I do well with selective yellow fog lights, I was not fooled. But many are...

    BTW, I'm very happy with the Philips Xtreme Power bulbs in my Motorcycle, and the set I put in Dad's Town Car resulted in immediate comment about the improvement. Xtreme Vision should be just a bit better.
    There are two kinds of light - the glow that illumines, and the glare that obscures. ~James Thurber

  8. #8

    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    Try that tint-strip-at-the-top-of-the-windshield trick with a High Pressure Sodium street light; the effect is much more pronounced. yeah, it gets whiter...and a whole heck of a lot dimmer!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    LOL! I will. Come to think of it, we even have a row of low pressure sodium lights on the dam.

    Frankly, as money-motivated as Washington State Patrol is, I'm surprised they haven't already come up with some sort of Trooper-portable light meter so they can write tickets to all the clowns with the obnoxious glaring blue HID "conversions." Maybe it's not as simple as the light transmission meter for checking window tint, but I think the outfits making radar guns, breathalyzers, tint meters, etc. should seize upon the economic opportunity soon.
    There are two kinds of light - the glow that illumines, and the glare that obscures. ~James Thurber

  10. #10
    Flashaholic* Alaric Darconville's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    Remember: It's not whiter, and it's not bluer. It's simply less yellow. Nothing is *added* to the light.

    Regarding the XTP: A+++++++, would buy again

  11. #11

    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaric Darconville View Post
    Remember: It's not whiter, and it's not bluer. It's simply less yellow. Nothing is *added* to the light.

    Regarding the XTP: A+++++++, would buy again
    This is the exact reason why I purchased the Philips X-Treme Vision today .

    Got some Philips blue vision side light bulbs too.

    Cheers guys .
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  12. #12

    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    Human eyes are more sensitive to blue light (maybe that's why in-dash high beam indicator lights is so darn irritating). This creates the illusion of greater light output; actually, the light is more dazzling, not brighter.

    From oncoming traffic's perspective, the blue headlights appear to be brighter (see above), but from the driver's perspective, road/object illumination is poorer because blue-colored light is not brighter - it's just bluer. As previously said, any coating on bulbs is going to reduce light output (no matter what color). I have tested this myself, when in a pinch and I had to replace failed headlight bulbs before heading over the mountains on my 90-mile commute at night. I was genuinely concerned that I would see not wildlife in time. Even though the white, reflective concrete road surface immediately in front of me seemed brighter (by being bluer), everything else just disappeared in the darkness.

    Philips offer an intriguing alternative for those who simply must have more color in their life - Philips NightGuide. This bulb is purported to increase safety by adding a little color to the fringes (only) of beam patterns by adding rings of different colors toward the base of the bulb. Even they do not boast of the increased light output of the X-Treme Vision bulbs.

    If the bulbs are blued - you're screwed. Same goes for any other color.

    One "exception" to the above rule to ponder: yellow tint in fog lights have been most helpful to me when driving in snow or severe weather. They offer a color contrast that complements the white headlights. Another benefit - cosmetic - is you don't have to worry about color temperature matching foggies to headlights - they just look cool. Light output in foglamps, although important, takes a (slightly) back seat to beam pattern (flat & wide) and source location (the lower the better).

  13. #13

    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    Quote Originally Posted by DenCon View Post
    Human eyes are more sensitive to blue light (maybe that's why in-dash high beam indicator lights is so darn irritating). This creates the illusion of greater light output; actually, the light is more dazzling, not brighter.
    True, but careful, though: "more sensitive" can be a good thing, as when the output from a light source is rich in wavelengths near the peak of the Vλ or V'λ and thereby stimulating good visual acuit, or it can be a bad thing, as in the case of blue light stimulating a stronger glare reaction than non-blue light. The latter is the case with blue-tinted "whiter" headlight bulbs.

    From oncoming traffic's perspective, the blue headlights appear to be brighter (see above), but from the driver's perspective, road/object illumination is poorer because blue-colored light is not brighter - it's just bluer.
    I agree. There's a big gap between the (small) amount of light it takes to cause or worsen glare, and the (large) amount of light it takes to light up objects on the road effectively for the driver, who really needs all the light he or she can safely get.

    Philips offer an intriguing alternative for those who simply must have more color in their life - Philips NightGuide. This bulb is purported to increase safety by adding a little color to the fringes (only) of beam patterns by adding rings of different colors toward the base of the bulb.
    Yeah, supposedly a blue patch along the curb side of the beam and a yellow patch near oncoming drivers' eyes. It's an interesting trick, but pointless and silly (in my opinion) for a few reasons. For one thing, this is not 1982, when all replaceable-bulb headlamps used parabolic reflectors and formulaic optic configurations. Now, there's an enormous variety of different optical techniques even if we just look at headlamps that take one particular kind of bulb. So the blue and yellow filter patches on the bulb don't necessarily put the blue and yellow patches at any particular place in the beam pattern. Philips attempts to get around this by marketing "H7R" and "H7S" for reflector and projector headlamps, respectively, but...sheesh. The only reason I don't rant harder at this silliness is because as gimmicky bulbs go, these are relatively benign and the rest of Philips' line contains really good, high-performing options without gimmicks.

    If the bulbs are blued - you're screwed.
    +0.75. I can't quite say "+1" because there's an interesting exception to this otherwise sound rule of thumb: the blue ring near the tip of bulbs like Xtreme Power, Xtreme Vision, and GE Night Hawk Platinum. The marketers say this is there to make a fashion statement with your headlamps. And from various off-axis angles as you observe the headlamp, you do see some blue. But that's not the actual reason it's there. It's really there to cut the mean spherical output of the bulb down to legal levels as tested in an integrating sphere. Clever trick: filter a part of the bulb that has nothing to do with beam formation because it's located where the reflector isn't looking for the filament. Give the kids a blue flash they can point to from certain angles without coloring the beam or filtering out any usable light. Meanwhile, the filament is pumping mad lumenzz through the uncolored glass where the reflector is looking.

    One "exception" to the above rule to ponder: yellow tint in fog lights have been most helpful to me when driving in snow or severe weather. They offer a color contrast that complements the white headlights. Another benefit - cosmetic - is you don't have to worry about color temperature matching foggies to headlights - they just look cool. Light output in foglamps, although important, takes a (slightly) back seat to beam pattern (flat & wide) and source location (the lower the better).
    I agree with all of this. Stern's got a pretty lengthy article on yellow light for fog lamps, including a discussion of the filtration losses (which are trivial with yellow, compared to large losses with blue).

  14. #14

    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    Quote Originally Posted by Scheinwerfermann View Post
    For one thing, this is not 1982, when all replaceable-bulb headlamps used parabolic reflectors and formulaic optic configurations. Now, there's an enormous variety of different optical techniques even if we just look at headlamps that take one particular kind of bulb. So the blue and yellow filter patches on the bulb don't necessarily put the blue and yellow patches at any particular place in the beam pattern.
    This is absolutely true. I tried this bulbs once in HB5 in a '97 Dodge Dakota I used to own. The colors in the beam pattern were actually opposite of what they were supposed to be; they were reversed. The left side got the blue and the right side got the yellow. Looking at the lamps from the front, they had a greenish look to them. This truck used relatively low-tech headlamp housings with lense optics so the colors got all washed about exiting the lamp. I eventually put in an older set of GE Nighthawks I had from a previous vehicle and those stayed until I sold the truck.

  15. #15
    *Flashaholic* kaichu dento's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    Quote Originally Posted by Scheinwerfermann View Post
    Stern's got a pretty lengthy article on yellow light for fog lamps, including a discussion of the filtration losses (which are trivial with yellow, compared to large losses with blue).
    I bet by now you see why filtering for yellow does not significantly reduce light output: Take our 1000-lumen 9006 as broken down by colour output above. No such thing as a filter that adds extra yellow light, so we have to get our yellow by suppressing blue-violet (the particular yellow in question, selective yellow, contains all the green found in white light. If we took out green, we'd have a turn signal type of amber-orange light.) OK, then, let's cut blue-violet by 80%. That means we've got our 925 lumens' worth of red-orange-yellow-green, plus 15 lumens' worth of blue-violet (after filtration). Total: 940 lumens. MUCH smaller loss! OK, so we put in a very slightly better filament, say one that produces 1060 lumens, and now we've got 980 lumens' worth of red-orange-yellow-green, plus 16 lumens' worth of blue-violet (after filtration) for a total of 996 lumens, which is for all intents and purposes identical to our original 1000-lumen uncoloured bulb—for context, the dimmest allowable parking lamp bulb produces 30 lumens.
    Scheinwerfermann, is there a readily available bulb that fits this description?
    Marduke - Solitaire...I've seen matches which are brighter AND have a longer runtime. 光陰矢の如し

  16. #16

    Default Re: Philips Blue Vision vs Philips X-Treme Vision

    There are no good selective yellow bulbs on the market, no.

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