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Thread: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

  1. #1

    Default Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    I did a quick overview video of this fantastic bulb.


  2. #2
    BVH's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    Good review but you didn't light it up for us?
    WWII 60" Anti Aircraft Carbon Arc (Sold), Short Arcs: 1.6KW NightSun, 1KW VSS-3A, .8KW TrakkaBeam, 600 Watt M-134 Gun Light, 500 Watt X-500-14s, 500 Watt Starburst, 300 Watt Locators, Megaray, 150 Watt Set Beam & Communicator, Maxabeam Gen3, LarryK14@52V

  3. #3

    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    Quote Originally Posted by BVH View Post
    Good review but you didn't light it up for us?
    Yeah, sorry, my SD card filled up. Poor planning on my part. I'll have to make a part 2.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    Here is a second video with temperature measurement and light demo.


  5. #5

    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    Ok, somebody (please) tell me if I'm wrong on this.

    I've also noticed that other Phillips LED bulbs tend to run too hot to touch. Thinking about this for a moment (no, I won't strain myself) if we measure the outside of the sink at 70C, is it pretty safe to assume that on die or junction temp is likely up 50% higher?

    The remote phosphor design obviously keeps that aspect of the design away from the furnance, but how is Phillips getting their longevity numbers when the base LED is baking?

    Oh yeah....kudos for the review.

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    BVH's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    Thanks for doing the 2nd part!
    WWII 60" Anti Aircraft Carbon Arc (Sold), Short Arcs: 1.6KW NightSun, 1KW VSS-3A, .8KW TrakkaBeam, 600 Watt M-134 Gun Light, 500 Watt X-500-14s, 500 Watt Starburst, 300 Watt Locators, Megaray, 150 Watt Set Beam & Communicator, Maxabeam Gen3, LarryK14@52V

  7. #7
    Enlightened
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    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    I'd have reservations in regards to your temperature measurements with the infrared thermometer. The silver heat sink will certainly have a lower emissivity than the .95 that most infrared thermometers are set for so the actual temperature of the metal parts is probably even higher than indicated.

    Hugh
    Last edited by SciGuy; 01-22-2012 at 05:39 AM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    Quote Originally Posted by SciGuy View Post
    I'd have reservations in regards to your temperature measurements with the infrared thermometer. The silver heat sink will certainly have a lower emissivity than the .95 that most infrared thermometers are set for so the actual temperature of the metal parts is probably even higher than indicated.
    Good point. I need to get myself one of those nice multimeters with a thermal probe.

  9. #9
    Flashaholic* Larbo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    I bought a 60w and 75w led Philips bulbs 2 weeks ago to replace the few incans left in the house, everything else is cfl, these are on the special dimmers for cfl/led lights.
    The only thing I miss the the real low glow you can get from an incan, these dim down and at a certain point just turn off, this is normal.

  10. #10
    Flashaholic* JohnR66's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    Quote Originally Posted by SciGuy View Post
    I'd have reservations in regards to your temperature measurements with the infrared thermometer. The silver heat sink will certainly have a lower emissivity than the .95 that most infrared thermometers are set for so the actual temperature of the metal parts is probably even higher than indicated.

    Hugh
    I wonder if the heatsink has a coating. Most seem to have it to improve emissivity to help get rid of some of the heat. Color don't matter much as white coatings can be .97 or more emissive.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnR66 View Post
    I wonder if the heatsink has a coating. Most seem to have it to improve emissivity to help get rid of some of the heat. Color don't matter much as white coatings can be .97 or more emissive.
    Here is a very interesting read on how coatings affect emissivity and therefore temperature: http://www.molalla.net/members/leeper/coatbar.htm

  12. #12
    Enlightened
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    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnR66 View Post
    I wonder if the heatsink has a coating. Most seem to have it to improve emissivity to help get rid of some of the heat. Color don't matter much as white coatings can be .97 or more emissive.
    It certainly looks like it's way better than a polished aluminum surface but since it still "looks significantly metallically reflective" it probably isn't too terribly high an emissivity. Perhaps it has a super coating of some sort that emits infrared extremely well.

    Hugh

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    *Flashaholic* LuxLuthor's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    I can say I would like to try this bulb, but the length & heat issue is going to be a concern for some fixture applications, and safety may be a concern with children grabbing it with that heatsink base sticking out so far. I would like to see some more objective tests on longevity and how the plastic holds up to see if the life estimate is realistic...although I don't know how to test that with results coming any time soon. It is great that it is dimmable. I will wait for prices to lower...but this is the type of thing I have been waiting to see, and they should have had this as a proven, ripe, affordable technology before issuing the incandescent light bulb bans. I can't use something like this in my many built in recessed lighting fixtures. Not even the CFL will fit unless I go down to lower watt outputs. I also need dimming in a number of banks of lights which rules out CFL's. In any case, this is a very cool development that I will follow and likely try to use in certain fixtures.

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    Flashaholic* nein166's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    I think receipts are printed on heat sensitive paper, I've never replaced ink in a point of sale printer, just paper. You may want to keep it in a cooler location

  15. #15

    Default Re: Hands on with the Philips 75 Watt equivalent LED bulb

    Quote Originally Posted by nein166 View Post
    I think receipts are printed on heat sensitive paper, I've never replaced ink in a point of sale printer, just paper. You may want to keep it in a cooler location
    There is no issue. The lamp shade/paper probably don't get much over 80-90º.

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