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Thread: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

  1. #1

    Default Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review





    The Philips “Award Winning LED Bulb” is finally in stores and ready for purchase. The award that the name refers to is the Department of Energy’s L-Prize which laid out standards for a “next generation” light bulb. Philips Lighting ultimately won the competition after meeting or exceeding all criteria and claimed a $10 million prize. At 94 lumens/Watt, this bulb is currently the world’s most efficient A19 form factor bulb. The total power consumption is 10 Watts for a total output of 940 lumens. The estimated lifespan of the bulb is 30,000 hours which comes out to over 27 years when used 3 hours per day. Along with its very high efficiency, this bulb also boasts a color rendering indexof 92 which helps to ensure that colors are accurately rendered. The color temperature is rated at 2700K which is standard for incandescent bulbs and warmer than most LED and compact fluorescent bulbs.
    http://i.imgur.com/J0aqR.jpg

    Like Philips’ first generation LED bulb, this uses remote phosphor technology to convert non-white light to white light. The first generation bulb used three blue LEDs behind each yellow plastic lens. This new bulb uses three blue and three red LEDs. This combination helps improve the color rendering index from 80 with the previous bulb, to 92 with the new bulb. After some prying, I was able to get the plastic lenses off to see what it looked like underneath.

    http://i.imgur.com/bhGst.jpg

    http://i.imgur.com/8uB6L.jpg
    The smooth heatsink doesn’t get very hot even after several hours of operation. It becomes too hot to hold onto for more than 2-3 seconds, but it is definitely cooler than many other LED bulbs that I have tested.
    The blub is dimmable using leading-edge dimmers according to the box. I tested it out with a dimmer and found that it gives off a quiet buzz when on a dimmer even when at full brightness. The buzzing is probably loud enough to be distracting if you are using this as a reading light. On the subject of dimmability, I found that the bulb’s light output becomes a very ugly color when dimmed. As you begin to dim, the light turns bluish and then it becomes pink. Overall, the dimming characteristics of this bulb are quite poor. My favorite dimmable bulb is still the Utilitech 60W equivalent.

    The light output of the bulb is very good. The design allows light to be cast in all directions in a fashion similar to a standard incandescent bulb. Also, at 940 lumens, this bulb is one of the brightest available with the exception of Philips’ own 75 Watt equivalent bulb that puts out 1100 lumens. The light quality at full brightness is good enough that nobody would likely suspect that it isn’t an incandescent bulb if it is hidden by a lamp shade.
    As for the design of the bulb, some will love it and some will hate it. The yellow plastic lenses on this new bulb are an ugly yellow in contrast to the nice golden yellow lenses on the first generation bulb. Personally, I think that is is cool looking bulb, but the first generation is much more visually appealing to me (the ugly yellow lenses are really quite hideous).

    The initial retail price of the Philips L-Prize inspired bulb will be $50. Yes, FIFTY DOLLARS! The first generation 60 Watt equivalent bulb can be had for less than $25 now and I honestly would recommend it over this new “Award winning LED bulb”. The old bulb puts out 800 lumens with 12.5 Watts of electricity. So, yes, it is significantly less efficient than the new bulb and the color rendering index isn’t as good. Even as an LED bulb enthusiast I wouldn’t spend $50 for this new bulb given what I know now about it. I hope that this review helps other LED enthusiasts decide to skip it. With luck, Philips will be forced to bring the price down when they realize that even the early adopters don’t want it at this price.

    So in conclusion, this is an excellent bulb if you need extreme efficiency such as in a hotel lobby or other places that have the lights on 24 hours per day. It will not only save on electricity, but also on maintenance costs to replace bulbs since at 30,000 hours of life it will take nearly 4 years of continuous use before they start to fail. For home use though, I would recommend the first generation Philips LED bulb since it is cheaper and still puts out plenty of high quality light.



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  2. #2

    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Thanks for the link and review(s). While I was there I read one of the GE posts as well. I hope you take this as it's intended and that's as constructive criticism but with the Internet full of bulb reviews from professional rags like EE Times and LED Magazine plus the DOE and IES testing it would lend more weight to your reviews if you listed your background and the test methods. If your review is purely subjective then that is fine but still toss out your background and the environment ou are using to assess the bulbs. It would belong on the review About page, not here.

    Your writing style makes for an easy read which is a nice change of pace from "white paper" format. Nice looking site too. Thanks again for the link.

  3. #3
    Flashaholic Marcturus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    gee, do we really need another thread?
    Last edited by Marcturus; 03-10-2012 at 02:09 PM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by ratsbew View Post
    The smooth heatsink doesn’t get very hot even after several hours of operation. It becomes too hot to hold onto for more than 2-3 seconds, but it is definitely cooler than many other LED bulbs that I have tested.
    The blub is dimmable using leading-edge dimmers according to the box. I tested it out with a dimmer and found that it gives off a quiet buzz when on a dimmer even when at full brightness. The buzzing is probably loud enough to be distracting if you are using this as a reading light. On the subject of dimmability, I found that the bulb’s light output becomes a very ugly color when dimmed. As you begin to dim, the light turns bluish and then it becomes pink. Overall, the dimming characteristics of this bulb are quite poor. My favorite dimmable bulb is still the Utilitech 60W equivalent.

    The light output of the bulb is very good. The design allows light to be cast in all directions in a fashion similar to a standard incandescent bulb. Also, at 940 lumens, this bulb is one of the brightest available with the exception of Philips’ own 75 Watt equivalent bulb that puts out 1100 lumens. The light quality at full brightness is good enough that nobody would likely suspect that it isn’t an incandescent bulb if it is hidden by a lamp shade.
    As for the design of the bulb, some will love it and some will hate it. The yellow plastic lenses on this new bulb are an ugly yellow in contrast to the nice golden yellow lenses on the first generation bulb. Personally, I think that is is cool looking bulb, but the first generation is much more visually appealing to me (the ugly yellow lenses are really quite hideous).

    The initial retail price of the Philips L-Prize inspired bulb will be $50. Yes, FIFTY DOLLARS! The first generation 60 Watt equivalent bulb can be had for less than $25 now and I honestly would recommend it over this new “Award winning LED bulb”. The old bulb puts out 800 lumens with 12.5 Watts of electricity. So, yes, it is significantly less efficient than the new bulb and the color rendering index isn’t as good. Even as an LED bulb enthusiast I wouldn’t spend $50 for this new bulb given what I know now about it. I hope that this review helps other LED enthusiasts decide to skip it. With luck, Philips will be forced to bring the price down when they realize that even the early adopters don’t want it at this price.

    So in conclusion, this is an excellent bulb if you need extreme efficiency such as in a hotel lobby or other places that have the lights on 24 hours per day. It will not only save on electricity, but also on maintenance costs to replace bulbs since at 30,000 hours of life it will take nearly 4 years of continuous use before they start to fail. For home use though, I would recommend the first generation Philips LED bulb since it is cheaper and still puts out plenty of high quality light.

    Thanks for your sharing~

    How does it make 100 .26 luminous efficiency(lm/w) at LM79 report ? it's an incredible specification , the 60w equivalent bulb is just 64 lm/w...

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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    I'm curious to see if you change the phosphor globe with the 2 versions to see what color light you get as a result. I would expect the more yellow colored phosphor on the 75 watt bulb to be cooler in color.

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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by patrickhuang View Post
    Thanks for your sharing~

    How does it make 100 .26 luminous efficiency(lm/w) at LM79 report ? it's an incredible specification , the 60w equivalent bulb is just 64 lm/w...
    They got such improvement by changing the way of achieving the warm white tone. Instead of using blue LEDs and a remote phosphor which convert a large percentage to long wavelengths (red tones), in this lamp they used blue and red LEDs, with a remote phosphor which only converts to shorter wavebands (green and yellow). This solution is way more efficient than the older one.

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    Flashaholic* hank's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Can you identify the wavelength of the 'blue' emitters? I wonder if they put out something into the ultraviolet range. ANy caution about taking the phosphor/cover layer off and exposing the bare emitters?

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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Damp locations too, a few of these might be nice for our older bathroom fixtures that seem to kill CCFL's on a yearly basis.

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    Flashaholic* JohnR66's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    50% more efficient than common spiral CFLs, CRI beyond 90 and expected lifetime better as well. While it won't sell at $50, you can expect when other manufactures figure out that blue & red LEDs with remote phosphor are a good way to go, there will be much more LED products coming later this year at better prices. In the next couple years, I expect 10 watt, 1000 lumen, 90 CRI bulbs for around $20.

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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by hank View Post
    Can you identify the wavelength of the 'blue' emitters? I wonder if they put out something into the ultraviolet range. Ayy caution about taking the phosphor/cover layer off and exposing the bare emitters?
    About 450nm peak wavelength, no any emission in the UV.

    As with any powerful blue emitter, never look at it directly from close distance. But it is unconfortable well before the threshold for eye's damage, so actually your instintive reflex are protection enough.

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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnR66 View Post
    50% more efficient than common spiral CFLs, CRI beyond 90 and expected lifetime better as well. While it won't sell at $50, you can expect when other manufactures figure out that blue & red LEDs with remote phosphor are a good way to go, there will be much more LED products coming later this year at better prices. In the next couple years, I expect 10 watt, 1000 lumen, 90 CRI bulbs for around $20.
    Fully agreed, actually there is some other brands releasing such bulbs right now, but emitting about 800lm instead of 900lm. In the next two years this level of performance should become very usual at much lower prices.

    For the moment, at bulbs.com its at $59.99.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Kinnza View Post
    About 450nm peak wavelength, no any emission in the UV.

    As with any powerful blue emitter, never look at it directly from close distance. But it is uncomfortable well before the threshold for eye's damage, so actually your instinctive reflex are protection enough.

    Any chance the red emitter is the 660 nm Rebel? That would be ... funny... given that there is a shortage of them right now.

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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    No, it is the orange Rebel. 660nm is deep red with very low photometric efficacy (little lumens produced), nobody uses it for human's lighting, as it adds little lm and just improve marginally CRI (if any).

    Most solutions are using orange-red LEDs, with peak wavelengths below 620nm. Actually, LEDs spectrums are following the same path than fluorescents did, and almost all fluorescents today uses a peak between 610 and 620nm.

    A paper about the "Brilliant mix" concept by Osram explain it very well. Its a very similar concept than the Cree "True White" and the used by Phillips in the L-Prize lamp.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    The Home Depot now has it in stock online for $50.

    http://www.homedepot.com/Electrical-...ProductDisplay

  15. #15

    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    About 450nm peak wavelength, no any emission in the UV.
    The latest royal rebels typically have a dominant wavelength about 5nm shorter than Cree tends to run. May seem insignificant, but you can see the difference and I'm curious why Rebels have gone that direction. I would imagine the base of the bulb get's fairly warm.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    The Luxeon Royal Blue emission wavelength selection might be driven by the absorption spectrum of the phosphors they intend them to be used with. Not to be too picky but peak wavelength and dominant wavelength are not the same thing. I don't really understand why for some manufacturers the blue/royal blue LEDs or die are spec'd using dominant instead of peak wavelength.

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    Flashaholic Marcturus's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Kinnza View Post
    No, it is the orange Rebel. 660nm is deep red with very low photometric efficacy (little lumens produced), nobody uses it for human's lighting, as it adds little lm and just improve marginally CRI (if any).

    Most solutions are using orange-red LEDs, with peak wavelengths below 620nm. Actually, LEDs spectrums are following the same path than fluorescents did, and almost all fluorescents today uses a peak between 610 and 620nm.
    That's a business or engineering point of view, not an esthetical one. Your claim that "nobody uses" 660nm is exaggerated, of course. 80+CRI GE Vio used 660nm, and I happen to sometimes use 660nm LEDs for indoor residential lighting, when I don't add incandescent light anyhow.

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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by blasterman View Post
    The latest royal rebels typically have a dominant wavelength about 5nm shorter than Cree tends to run. May seem insignificant, but you can see the difference and I'm curious why Rebels have gone that direction. I would imagine the base of the bulb get's fairly warm.
    Osram took the same path. The reason after it is well explained in the paper I linked above. If you use a narrow peak on the orange-red, you need the green peak is on the short green, or the final solution falls off ANSI accepted white, is less efficient photometrically and have poor CRI. Osram addressed it by directly offering an special range of white (EQ white) intended to be mixed with orange-red. The phosphor converted white needs to be off the planckian locus in order the solution has good efficiency and final result is close enough to PL so it fall into ANSI specifications.

    Phosphors has a broad Gaussian like spectral conversion, so if you want one with a peak at 550nm or shorter yet, its excitation band is going to be short too, usually with very reduced efficacy for blue over 460nm and optimal absortion about 440nm. Because that they are using deeper blues than for all phosphor converted white, where the longer blue works better (peak is on the green-yellow, overall CRI is better this way for this solution and blue adds more lm as longer its wavelength). Indeed, you can check how very often the warmer whites has blue chips with peaks at longer wl, up to 460nm.

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold_B View Post
    The Luxeon Royal Blue emission wavelength selection might be driven by the absorption spectrum of the phosphors they intend them to be used with. Not to be too picky but peak wavelength and dominant wavelength are not the same thing. I don't really understand why for some manufacturers the blue/royal blue LEDs or die are spec'd using dominant instead of peak wavelength.
    I would prefer too bins by peak wavelength instead of by dominant wl. But I understand dominant varies less with current and temperature than the peak so why manufacturers prefers it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Marcturus View Post
    That's a business or engineering point of view, not an esthetical one. Your claim that "nobody uses" 660nm is exaggerated, of course. 80+CRI GE Vio used 660nm, and I happen to sometimes use 660nm LEDs for indoor residential lighting, when I don't add incandescent light anyhow.
    You are right, it was an exaggerated statement. But it is a fact that it affects very little CRI while penalize hard photometric output so very little solutions uses it due the market focus on CRI for color quality. Violet based whites has been always marginal and only GE worked hard on it and it never was a sales success AFAIK. Apart of it, just very special applications, as lighting for red meat refrigerated stands and so are using deep red. In color rendering, it only makes a difference on the deep red tones. The color appearance of the light itself varies very marginally adding deep red, and except if very large amounts of it are used, little people is able to actually notice the difference.

    Anyway, you can't use deep red alone, you need amber-red too or the color rendering is very poor, and that means 3 chip solutions. BTW, I too prefer this solution aesthetically for the best light quality possible, but I think we agree a 3 chip solution is less pragmatic for most situations.

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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Kinnza View Post
    Interesting paper - Thanks for the link. I noticed one thing, listed under "Challenges" as "Color point stability". I assume it varies over the lamp life. Have you seen Philips measurements on color shift over the lamps 30k hour life?
    Jim

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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by brickbat View Post
    Interesting paper - Thanks for the link. I noticed one thing, listed under "Challenges" as "Color point stability". I assume it varies over the lamp life. Have you seen Philips measurements on color shift over the lamps 30k hour life?
    I dont think there is such data yet, not enough time for that.

    I believe the way Phillips manage it is by running LEDs very soft. At the current and temperature of typical operation, lm manteinance at 30Kh is going to be over 98%. The problem with long term color stability when there are no compensating electronics is the differential aging of red and blue LEDs, so by reducing the light emission depreciation they mostly avoid that issue.

    The other problem is the color shift depending of temperature. I dont know if the L-Prize lamp has any electronics for compensating it. It is not difficult, Cree has used them on their range of fixed lighting fixtures, but maybe Phillips avoided it in this lamp and rely too on the low power per LED to minimize that shift. It would be interesting to check if CCT varies with ambient temperature and if so, by how much.

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    Naughty Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Very interesting thread and following discussion. I'm an incandescent lover and I hate CFLs. First I started making incandescent bulb stocks (I'm from France that banned them; now I live in Canada where classic incandescent bulbs are still very common... until the next ban law) but since I discovered the XP-G 90 high-CRI led, I've been waiting for led improvements.

    I own some XP-G-90-based flashlights (the Armytek, the Puissanceled modded C2, and I ordered the HDS) and they really remind me good times, when I was using my Mag underground for dozens of continuous hours.

    But only a few people care about incandescent-like flashlight or headlamp lighting.

    However more people do care about home lighting and they don't like CFL rendering. They don't know what CRI and CCT mean, but they look for good and natural warm lighting. This is not a niche market, which explains IMHO why the L-Prize winner Phillips bulb was born. This bulb seem fascinating to me, if it really mimics incandescent. 60$ + shipping fees is pricey; should I wait? or is this bulb already a collectible as the first led bulb able to replace incandescent?

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    Flashaholic* kaichu dento's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Cavannus View Post
    But only a few people care about incandescent-like flashlight or headlamp lighting.
    You've actually got more company than you might think! It's fairly common for me to do a quick warm/cool presentation for non-flashaholics and have them mostly impressed with the ones they don't think look like LED's, in other words, my hCRI Clicky, hCRI V10R, warm MiNi AA, or even my 5b Draco.

    As another incan fan I definitely enjoyed reading your post and it makes me feel good to see others choosing aesthetics over quantity.
    Marduke - Solitaire...I've seen matches which are brighter AND have a longer runtime. 光陰矢の如し

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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Yesterday I found that Dough Leeper has performed an awesome teardown of the L-Prize winner Phillips lamp.

    Extremely detailed, great pics and the highest rigor as he always did . It has been years since the last time he posted on CPF but I'm very glad he continues sharing his knowledge on this topic in his page.

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    Flashaholic Theatre Booth Guy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by kaichu dento View Post
    You've actually got more company than you might think! It's fairly common for me to do a quick warm/cool presentation for non-flashaholics and have them mostly impressed with the ones they don't think look like LED's, in other words, my hCRI Clicky, hCRI V10R, warm MiNi AA, or even my 5b Draco.

    As another incan fan I definitely enjoyed reading your post and it makes me feel good to see others choosing aesthetics over quantity.
    That's a great idea. Brightness sure gets peoples attention but I bet showing them color and cri differences could be even more illuminating ;-) This also reminds me that I need to work at finding a good high cri flashlight that's not too expensive and is available.
    Brian

    After getting an HDS, other flashlights seem much less relevant (Except for some of the really special lights found on CPF!)
    When things are really dark, a dim light for a long time is much better than a blinding light for a short time.

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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Theatre Booth Guy View Post
    That's a great idea. Brightness sure gets peoples attention but I bet showing them color and cri differences could be even more illuminating ;-) This also reminds me that I need to work at finding a good high cri flashlight that's not too expensive and is available.
    Instead of shining the light at things, I shine in on my hand, and few if any like the cooler tints over warmer, particularly when it comes to skin tones.
    Marduke - Solitaire...I've seen matches which are brighter AND have a longer runtime. 光陰矢の如し

  26. #26

    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    When will we see 5500-6500K versions of these things?

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Is it possible to buy these in europe?

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    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    tickled
    When will we see 5500-6500K versions of these things?
    NO. The L-Prize requirement is to be as close to an incandescent 60W as possible. (Nice warm yellow.)
    : US DOE L Prize Requirement - Philips Result (average for 200 units)*
    Luminous flux : > 900 lm - 910 lm
    Wattage (W) : ≤ 10 W - 9.7 W
    Efficacy (lm/W): > 90 lm/W - 93.4 lm/W
    Correlated color temperature (CCT) : 2700-3000 K - 2727 K
    Color rendering index (CRI) : > 90 - 93
    http://www.lightingprize.org/60watttest.stm

    sandos
    Is it possible to buy these in europe?
    NO. The L Prize is USA specific. 115VAC 60Hz. Europe is 230VAC 50Hz. Won't even work. (So do not even try buying it from a US online store.) Also have to be Made In The USA.
    Philips may make an equivalent bulb for Europe sometime in the future.
    The closest for now is
    Philips MasterLED 12W B22 Warm White LED Light Bulb £37.99
    and
    Philips 12w E27 Screw Cap Warm White GLS LED A60 £30.90
    at amazon.co.uk
    YIKES! Those are expensive over there. The 12W is ~$25 in the US and ~$30 in Canada.
    The L Prize is $60 in brick and mortar stores and $50 + shipping at online stores.

    More info of the 12W here:
    http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/...s-12w-Teardown
    Last edited by LEDninja; 05-10-2012 at 06:58 PM.

  29. #29

    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    I was aware of the requirements of the competition, it was more of a general query. I am not a big fan of these LED 'bulb' replacements with sub 3000K temperatures but it's all that's available in stores.

  30. #30

    Default Re: Philips Award Winning LED Bulb Review

    Quote Originally Posted by tickled View Post
    I was aware of the requirements of the competition, it was more of a general query. I am not a big fan of these LED 'bulb' replacements with sub 3000K temperatures but it's all that's available in stores.
    Utilitech (I believe Feit makes the bulb) has a ~5000K version of their 40W incandescent equivalent bulb available at Lowes. Seems a bit closer to 6000K to me, but matches my ~4000K outdoor lighting close enough.
    I apologize that this letter is so long; I did not have time to write a short letter

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