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Thread: Niteye EYE10 Review

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    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Niteye EYE10 Review

    A new member of the Niteye High-end series, the EYE10 is an EDC light capable of real ‘pocket-rocket’ performance.

    On test is a pre-release sample. It is the final version, but the retail packaging has not been finalised.



    Initial Impressions:

    Well… it looks quite familiar, despite being a new Niteye model. I’m told by Niteye that the design for this and a version sold by another manufacturer was created by one designer. Both Niteye and the other manufacturer have the rights to make this design, and do so independently.

    Everything about the EYE10 is finished to a very high level of quality. From the stainless steel bezel, coated optics, cooling fins, titanium pocket clip and magnetic control ring, there appear to be no weak points in its execution.

    Design wise, the pocket clip extends over the join between head and battery tube, so unless you are careful to slightly lift the clip when changing battery, you will end up marking the head. However to have usable pocket clip this design feature is necessary.

    The infinitely adjustable magnetic control ring has strong ball/detent clicks as you turn it, so although you can stop between clicks, in normal use you wouldn’t, as the ring naturally goes from click-stop to click-stop.

    Small, well made, bright and with completely adjustable output, the EYE10 make a good first impression.



    What is in the box:

    Being a Pre-release sample, there was no packaging.

    EYE10 - as supplied with Allen key and spare o-ring.



    The EYE10





    Taking a closer look and looking inside:

    The EYE10 is a single CR123 light, shown here with an AW RCR123 cell



    Looking down onto the pocket clip which is held on with two Allen bolts that the supplier Allen key will remove if you want to.



    The tail end has a lanyard hole post made of stainless steel set into the tail. Although it protrudes a small amount this does not prevent tailstanding.



    The EYE10’s XM-L LED



    To better show the cooling fins I took this silhouette photo.



    With the head removed you can see the contacts and the small Allen bolt used to lock the head components in place.



    The threads are trapezoid and fully anodised.




    Looking down into the battery tube shows the negative contact spring.



    For a CR123 size cell (shown here with an AW RCR123) the fit of the cell is loose. This is because the tube is designed to accommodate a 18350 cell. I don’t have one to test the fit, but there seems to be space.



    Switching the EYE10 onto a low setting and looking straight into the lens shows the square shape of the LED reflected in the OP reflector. This is a typical feature of small lights with the large XM-L LED and has not ill effects on the beam quality.



    The stainless steel bezel has a very neatly engraved/etched serial number.



    The model is printed onto the side.





    Modes and User Interface:

    The magnetic control ring gives a very simple user interface. The ring has a strong ball/detent series of clicks throughout its range of movement which hold the position firmly once selected.

    From the off position, with the EYE10 facing forwards, turn the control ring clockwise. After a few clicks, the light will come on in its lowest output, and as you turn the ring further clockwise the output ramps up all the way to maximum.

    Watching as the light level increases, the control ring does give a smooth rise in output. Theoretically you could select almost any level, but the click-stops of the ring mean it will naturally stop at certain levels.

    The EYE10 has two hidden modes, Strobe and SOS, both fully dimmable. To access these you take the EYE10 to maximum output and then quickly dim, then turn to max, then dim again and back to max to access Strobe, and if you do three of the dim-max repetitions you enter SOS mode.

    Once you have activated the Strobe or SOS, the control ring will be at the maximum position and therefore maximum output. At this point you can reduce the output level of either mode by turning the control ring anti-clockwise.

    Turning the EYE10 off cancels the hidden modes and reverts it to constant output.



    Batteries and output:

    The EYE10 manual states CR123 as the only supported battery type. I queried this with Niteye, who said that RCR123 can be used with caution as this raises the output to far more than the heatsinking is designed to cope with. As long as maximum is not used for longer than 5 minutes, RCR123 can be used, but has the danger of overheating reducing LED lifespan.

    Using a calibrated integrating sphere I measured the output with three different types of cell.



    Using the specified CR123, output was measured at 262lm, pretty much spot on the specified 260lm maximum output.

    Then, it got interesting….

    Using an AW protected RCR123 with ICR chemistry, the EYE10 output 563lm. An impressive boost.

    Then I loaded an AW RCR123 with IMR chemistry. IMRs have the lowest internal resistance of li-ions and have the ability to deliver very high current. On the IMR, the EYE10 output 662lm! Yes, you read right, 662lm. At this output level the EYE10 gets warm within 30s and hot after a minute or so. The heatsinking is good, but the entire light then gets hot after a couple of minutes.

    Of course as the EYE10 has completely variable output, even when using an IMR cell, you can simply turn it down a bit. You don’t HAVE to use maximum output all the time as tempting as it is.

    On IMR, the EYE10 is a real ‘pocket-rocket’!

    Between CR123 and RCR123, apart from the supercharging effect of the RCR123, I did notice that the absolutely lowest level would come on normally with the CR123, but with the RCR123, it would come on a little brighter and you need to then turn the control ring back a click to get the lowest level. A minor consequence of the massive boost in maximum output.



    In The Lab

    In an attempt to quantify the actual beam profile I developed the following test. There are probably many flaws in my method, but it is simple and easy to carry out and seems to provide a good enough comparison.

    The method used was to put the light on the edge of a table 1m from a wall, with a tape measure on the wall. The zero of the scale is placed in the centre of the hotspot and a lux meter is then positioned at points along the scale, with the measurements recorded. Beam shots are often taken with the light shining on a flat white wall, so this method is simply measuring the actual intensity across the beam on a flat surface, not the spherical light emission.

    The results are then plotted on a graph.

    For the best throw you want to see a sharp peak with less of the distracting spill. For the best flood light the trace should be pretty flat.


    Here I have compared the EYE10 to my reference Cree R2 profile. The EYE10 has a wide and diffuse hotspot and a floody beam perfect for everyday use.



    Taking this a little further, I calculated an approximate factor to apply to the lux measurements, as each measurement gets further from the centre of the beam, it corresponds to a larger area onto which the light is falling. It seems to me that this should also be taken into consideration, so I applied these area corrections and came up with this odd looking graph.

    The key quantity here is the area under the graph line. This should correspond to the total light output.


    As well as the reference Cree R2, I’ve included the Fenix TK41 for comparison here. The TK41 is well known for its high output level, and the EYE10 on IMR, shows how well it compares to the TK41 in total output. The TK41 with its powerful throw has a stronger central peak, but the EYE10 has more light around the hotspot.





    The beam of the EYE10

    As shown by the previous beam profile graphs, the EYE10 has an excellent general purpose beam with diffuse hotspot.

    The first beamshot is exposed to give an impression of the beam’s brightness to the naked eye.



    This second photo has the exposure reduced to show the shape/size of the hotspot and how it compares to the spill area.





    Using the EYE10

    Unlike small twisty EDC lights, which are almost counter-intuitive as it feels as if you are turning the head the wrong way to turn them on, the EYE10 has the control ring set to turn clockwise to turn it on and up. This feels very natural to a right hander holding the EYE10 in their right hand, possibly not so good for a left hander.

    The first few clicks as you rotate the control ring do not give any output and on the third or fourth click the light comes on in the lowest output. Adjusting to the required output level is just a few more clicks away.

    The texturing of the control ring and body give plenty of grip without any sharp edges and the EYE10 is a good size to hold.

    The pocket clip has perfectly finished edges that have been rounded so will not cut into your pocket.

    I have accidentally tested out the resilience of the stainless bezel, by dropping the EYE10 from about 1m high onto a stone floor. The floor now has a chip in it and the EYE10’s bezel a small mark. The EYE10 came out on top in that clash.



    Fit, finish and performance of the little light are all very good and it is a pleasure to use.

    The Niteye EYE10 information





    Test sample provided for review by Niteye.

    I’ll update post 2 of this thread once I have some more comments to add....
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  2. #2
    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    The control ring has 11 click-stops.

    Depending on the battery used the LED comes on when you reach the second (CR123) or third (RCR123) click.

    reserved for further comments....
    Last edited by subwoofer; 05-14-2012 at 12:19 AM.
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    I prefer this to the JB. this has an OP reflector! Yay!

  4. #4

    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by xed888 View Post
    I prefer this to the JB. this has an OP reflector! Yay!
    It does look slightly superior to the Jetbeam. Compared to the Jetbeam this one has:
    (1) an orange-peel reflector
    (2) a brighter emitter for probably slightly more output (U2 v. T6). This review rated the EYE10's output on IMR at 662 lumens. I saw another poster in a different thread tested the Jetbeam on IMR at 542 lumens. No idea how well calibrated the testing equipment was though. No idea how the tints compare. The tint of the EYE10 in the pictures on this review look very green compared to the very white color on my Jetbeam. Could just be the camera though, or that the light was shined on a green painted wall in the picture.
    (3) better hidden modes. The Jetbeam has hidden SOS that isn't dimmable. The EYE10 has hidden strobe and SOS, both of which are dimmable. From reading the review and using the Jetbeam it sounds like all hidden modes on both lights are well hidden and won't be activated accidentally.
    (3) Extra detentes. The Jetbeam has a single detente at each end. The EYE10 sounds like it has multiple detentes throughout the ring travel. I'm not sure if that's good or bad.
    (4) Better heatsinking. The EYE10 looks like it has actual heatsink fins at the head while the Jetbeam does not. I'm not sure how much of a difference that makes in actual heat dissipation though, since the Jetbeam might actually have slightly more mass up front.
    (5) Different style of knurling. This part is relative. Not sure which light has better grip. The Jetbeam might be better actually since the knurling covers the entire control ring. The EYE10 looks like the knurling only covers part of the ring.
    (6) Possibly slightly lower price. From the one site that showed a price it looks like the EYE10 might be around 20% cheaper than the Jetbeam. Won't know for sure until an English language website starts selling it though.
    Last edited by Fireclaw18; 04-15-2012 at 01:33 PM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    subwoofer, thanks for another great review! Just curious as to at what time are your lumens readings taken? Is it at turn-on or after 30 seconds (ANSI)? As you know, for non-regulated lights it can mean a huge difference in drop-off. If at start-up, would you mind taking it at 31 seconds?

    Thx!,
    Tim

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    Flashaholic* nakahoshi's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Fireclaw18 View Post
    (3) better hidden modes. The Jetbeam has hidden SOS that isn't dimmable. The EYE10 has hidden strobe and SOS, both of which are dimmable. From reading the review and using the Jetbeam it sounds like all hidden modes on both lights are well hidden and won't be activated accidentally.
    This is not true, the Jetbeam can dim its SOS mode. I do however wish it had a strobe/beacon mode instead. At least its hidden well.

    As for the EYE10 -
    I love that it has an OP reflector, and the whole light looks great.

    I am not sure I like the half knurled adjustment ring though, I would prefer it would go all the way around the light but I am intrigued by the indents you feel when adjusting the control ring, it might make it easier (Or harder) to zero in on a particular output.

    Nice Review, looking forward to this one

    -Bobby

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    Flashaholic* MY's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Am really looking forward to this light. I would appreciate it if folks can share where this light can be purchased.Regards.
    Be Mindful of the Moment

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    Flashaholic* PapaLumen's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    I hope the production model has a bezel the same colour as the rest of it...

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    Flashaholic* KuanR's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Have these been shipped to dealers yet? I'm hoping to get the Ti version as I see TB selling it in China right now, so I hope Hong Kong stores will have them too.

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    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by turboBB View Post
    subwoofer, thanks for another great review! Just curious as to at what time are your lumens readings taken? Is it at turn-on or after 30 seconds (ANSI)? As you know, for non-regulated lights it can mean a huge difference in drop-off. If at start-up, would you mind taking it at 31 seconds?

    Thx!,
    Tim
    All quoted output measurements are taken at approximately (but not absolutely rigidly) 30s. Interestingly, most lights measured have an initial burst of output which declines quickly, then levels out. For most this levelling out is at around 30s after turn on.

    One notable exception is an HID light I have, which from cold is still increasing in output at 5 minutes only reaching its peak after about 6 minutes.
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  11. #11

    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by nakahoshi View Post
    This is not true, the Jetbeam can dim its SOS mode. I do however wish it had a strobe/beacon mode instead. At least its hidden well.

    As for the EYE10 -
    I love that it has an OP reflector, and the whole light looks great.

    I am not sure I like the half knurled adjustment ring though, I would prefer it would go all the way around the light but I am intrigued by the indents you feel when adjusting the control ring, it might make it easier (Or harder) to zero in on a particular output.

    Nice Review, looking forward to this one

    -Bobby
    You're right. I just checked again and the Jetbeam's SOS is dimmable.

    Regarding the half-knurling on the ring: On the Jetbeam, I find the best way to get maximum control over the ring is to use both my thumb and forefinger on either side of the ring while holding the rest of the light in my palm with my other fingers. Having a fully knurled ring makes this much easier.

  12. #12
    Enlightened
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    How low is the low in comparison to the v11r and rrt-01?

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    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Lagerregal View Post
    How low is the low in comparison to the v11r and rrt-01?
    I don't have either of those lights to do a direct comparison. What I can tell you is that Niteye specify 1lm as the low for the EYE10, but this is not correct - it goes lower.

    I have found the lowest sustainable level of output (a lower level is possible but it goes off after a few seconds) is equivalent to the Low of the Zebralight SC51 which Zebralight specify as 0.2lm. This is a 'by eye' comparison so is not quantitative, but subjective.
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  14. #14

    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Thank you for the excellent review or sneak preview. I can't seem to find the specs listed on any site yet. Could you please post the length, diameter and weight.

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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Fireclaw18 View Post
    The tint of the EYE10 in the pictures on this review look very green compared to the very white color on my Jetbeam. Could just be the camera though, or that the light was shined on a green painted wall in the picture.
    It' not the wall as subwoofer has done another review using the same wall, this light has a bad green tint. see here.




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    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by how2 View Post
    It' not the wall as subwoofer has done another review using the same wall, this light has a bad green tint. see here.
    I see the effect you have picked up on. It is odd as I am usually very careful to set the camera to daylight white balance for all beamshots.

    I can tell you that in use there is no strong tint noticeable, if anything it is more neutral than cool (it is not pure cool white) which is very nice to use.
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by subwoofer View Post
    I see the effect you have picked up on. It is odd as I am usually very careful to set the camera to daylight white balance for all beamshots.

    I can tell you that in use there is no strong tint noticeable, if anything it is more neutral than cool (it is not pure cool white) which is very nice to use.
    Thanks for clarifying that. I suspected it might be an issue with how you setup your camera because the tint in your pics looks almost pure green. And I can't imagine that the light would have had such a tint and you wouldn't have mentioned it in your review.

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    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by texas cop View Post
    Thank you for the excellent review or sneak preview. I can't seem to find the specs listed on any site yet. Could you please post the length, diameter and weight.
    23mm Diameter, 81mm long ~46g without battery.

    Quote Originally Posted by MY View Post
    Am really looking forward to this light. I would appreciate it if folks can share where this light can be purchased.Regards.
    I asked Niteye and got the following response:

    "MSRP for EYE10 is USD79. You can check with Goinggear and Illumination Supply in USA"
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by subwoofer View Post
    23mm Diameter, 81mm long ~46g without battery.

    Quote Originally Posted by subwoofer View Post
    I asked Niteye and got the following response:

    "MSRP for EYE10 is USD79. You can check with Goinggear and Illumination Supply in USA"

    note to self: move EYE10 into must have category.

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    Flashaholic* Fitz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Disappointing they can't make use of the first few detent clicks, same thing in the JB, nothing happens for the first 10-15 percent of the ring movement. It would be nice to have the light start outputting some light immediately and shorten the travel of the ring.
    Semper Fi

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    Flashaholic* nakahoshi's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Fitz View Post
    Disappointing they can't make use of the first few detent clicks, same thing in the JB, nothing happens for the first 10-15 percent of the ring movement. It would be nice to have the light start outputting some light immediately and shorten the travel of the ring.
    I thought this was done on purpose to avoid accidental activation. I actually like the way its designed (I have the JB, not this one... yet)

  22. #22

    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by nakahoshi View Post
    I thought this was done on purpose to avoid accidental activation. I actually like the way its designed (I have the JB, not this one... yet)
    Agreed (I also have the Jetbeam). The ring on the Jetbeam has 120 degrees of travel which is perfect. Enough that you can easily flick the ring from one end to the other in a quarter second with one twist without living your fingers up. But at the same time long enough that you can accurately adjust the brightness to whatever setting you want. I also like that the first 10-15 degrees or so of ring travel does nothing. That way there's much less chance of the light accidentally turning on on the pocket if the ring rubs against something and turns slightly.

  23. #23
    Unenlightened netman's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    I was thinking the same thing. This light will live in my pocket and unless the detent is very stiff I was seeing this as a safety/battery save feature.

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    *Flashaholic* fyrstormer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    If the driver is anything like the TC-R1's driver, the first bit of ring rotation doesn't do anything until after the light turns on. I can back-down the brightness on my TC-R1 well past the turn-on point, and it doesn't shut off until the ring bangs against the hard-stop.

  25. #25
    Flashaholic* Fitz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by fyrstormer View Post
    If the driver is anything like the TC-R1's driver, the first bit of ring rotation doesn't do anything until after the light turns on. I can back-down the brightness on my TC-R1 well past the turn-on point, and it doesn't shut off until the ring bangs against the hard-stop.
    Mine is the same whether turning it on or going back down from on, no light at all for the first 10-15% of ring travel.
    Semper Fi

  26. #26
    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by fyrstormer View Post
    If the driver is anything like the TC-R1's driver, the first bit of ring rotation doesn't do anything until after the light turns on. I can back-down the brightness on my TC-R1 well past the turn-on point, and it doesn't shut off until the ring bangs against the hard-stop.
    With the EYE10, after it comes on, you can turn the ring back one or two clicks to lower the output, but then it goes off and has a couple more clicks back to the hard stop.
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    Flashaholic* kaichu dento's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Lagerregal View Post
    How low is the low in comparison to the v11r and rrt-01?
    The low on the RRT-01 goes so low that a trit actually looks bright in a side-by-side comparison. The Sunwayman will look very, very bright when doing a low output comparison.
    Marduke - Solitaire...I've seen matches which are brighter AND have a longer runtime. 光陰矢の如し

  28. #28

    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Hello, Subwoofer!

    I just joined the forum yesterday and it's a pleasure to be part of it.

    Thank you for another excellent review of what looks to be a very tasty product.

    One thing I don't understand: why does the manufacturer recommend CR or RCR123 batteries (16mm dia.) when the inside diameter is obviously machined for the 18350 (18mm dia.)? Is there any battery rattling with the 123's, or does the spring compress it enough to prevent this unwanted noise?

  29. #29
    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Quote Originally Posted by offtrail View Post
    One thing I don't understand: why does the manufacturer recommend CR or RCR123 batteries (16mm dia.) when the inside diameter is obviously machined for the 18350 (18mm dia.)? Is there any battery rattling with the 123's, or does the spring compress it enough to prevent this unwanted noise?
    Hi offtrail,

    The spring holds CR123 sized cells very firmly, there is no rattle even if you shake it to try and get it to.

    As the CR123 is so common, the EYE10 was optimised for this 3V cell and can be run at maximum for extended periods on this cell. With the higher voltage of RCR123 it runs hot on maximum so you have to be careful. If you want to use the 18350 for extended runtime on a rechargeable cell, it is an option, but is unusual, so is not specified.
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  30. #30

    Default Re: Niteye EYE10 Review

    Subwoofer, I read your review last week and I was like I can't wait till this light is available and sure enough I went over to the dealer's section under CPFMarketplace on Saturday and found someone selling them! I should have it this week and will post my thoughts about the light.

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