Olight
Results 1 to 21 of 21

Thread: Sapphires don't just come in blue

  1. #1
    *Flashaholic* fyrstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northern VA, USA
    Posts
    5,831

    Default Sapphires don't just come in blue

    They also come in warmer colors.




    This is one of my Sapphire 25s, modded with a Nichia DS Warm LED. The tint is fabulous. Here it is next to a stock Sapphire 25:




    I've been carrying this for a while now, and while I'm generally not a fan of warm tints, this LED has great color rendering -- the best of any 5mm LED I've ever seen, actually. Despite how warm it is, blues actually "pop" quite well when illuminated by this light.




    The beam is slightly narrower than stock, but it retains the exact same beam pattern.




    I bought these LEDs in 2010. Now I feel kinda foolish for not trying them sooner. It's pretty much perfect.

  2. #2
    *Flashaholic* fyrstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northern VA, USA
    Posts
    5,831

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    Also, just for fun, here's a picture of the original Nichia GS emitter running on a nearly-dead battery, making the twin emitter dies clearly visible under the phosphor coating:


  3. #3
    Flashaholic*
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    869

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    Here is my 4500K High CRI Sapphire sporting an 10180 body from Peak:


    eala

  4. #4
    *Flashaholic* fyrstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northern VA, USA
    Posts
    5,831

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    Gosh that's cute. I could just pinch its little cheeks I could. Where did you get a Hi-CRI Sapphire from?

  5. #5
    Flashaholic* archimedes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    CONUS, arteriosus
    Posts
    3,238

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    ... and does the Li-Ion (10180) overdrive the LE?
    IF 2 = 1 THEN 1 = 0

  6. #6

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    Love it


    Quote Originally Posted by eala View Post
    Here is my 4500K High CRI Sapphire sporting an 10180 body from Peak:


    eala

  7. #7
    Flashaholic*
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    869

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    I had bought a whole bunch of the LEDs from Optosupply. Minimum quantities are high so I sold most of them off. The LED is very nice. No where near as nice as the High CRI LEDs that Don offers, but it works well in the Sapphire. Less flux than the stock.

    The Sapphire LE can handle up to 5V, so no problem on 10180 cells. The output remains the same so I assume the driver is a boost/buck style.

    I like that the Peak Eiger stuff is compatible with the Sapphire. I prefer the Peak bodies to the stock Sapphire one.

    I don have to use magnet spacers since I removed the QTC pill from the body. QTC is not compatible.

    eala

  8. #8
    *Flashaholic* fyrstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northern VA, USA
    Posts
    5,831

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    Probably ought to start a new thread to discuss this, but I thought the Sapphire 25 driver was boost-only? You're saying it's buck-boost? May I ask where you got that information from?

  9. #9
    Flashaholic*
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    869

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    Purely from my imagination. I thought you needed the voltage to the LED to be somewhere between 1.2 and 4.2 V which is why it was both boost and buck. Hoping Don can jump in and clarify. I am not an electrical engineer.

    I know that the light works perfectly no matter the battery used and the light output stays the same.

    eala

  10. #10
    *Flashaholic* fyrstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northern VA, USA
    Posts
    5,831

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    Yes, that is true, but since the Sapphire is designed to run on a 1.5V battery, the driver doesn't need to have buck functionality. It may in fact have it, though.

    Odd, I started this thread to show off my super-warm emitter mod, and somehow we ended up talking about drivers.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    Quote Originally Posted by eala View Post
    .... I thought you needed the voltage to the LED to be somewhere between 1.2 and 4.2 V which is why it was both boost and buck. Hoping Don can jump in and clarify. I am not an electrical engineer.

    I know that the light works perfectly no matter the battery used and the light output stays the same.

    eala
    I am not an electrical engineer either but I was told that the LE could handle a range of voltage similar to what you have stated. Actually I think it was good up to 5Vin but when I asked if it would be OK then with a USB input source I was told that the Vin from the USB might have voltage spikes that could trash the converter.
    Build Prices .... some mods and builds (not 4 sale) "Nature can be cruel- but we don't have to be."~ Temple Grandin

  12. #12
    *Flashaholic* fyrstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northern VA, USA
    Posts
    5,831

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    USB better not have voltage spikes. Computers don't tolerate voltage spikes; that's why they have big brick-like power supplies stuffed full of very large capacitors.

    Have you hooked up a Sapphire 25 driver to your bench power supply to test if it produces flat output between 1-5V? If not, can you? Inquiring minds would like to know.

  13. #13
    Flashaholic* archimedes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    CONUS, arteriosus
    Posts
    3,238

    Default

    The typical Vf for the Nichia NSPW310DS is 3.2V (max 3.5V) according to the data sheet.

    If the output from a 1.5V AAA is the same as that seen on a freshly charged 4.2V Li-Ion cell, my guess is that there is probably a buck circuit too. It is possible that the tiny 10180 might have some voltage sag under load, given its low capacity, but the drive current of 25mA is still only a fraction of its 90mAh ... under 0.3C.
    IF 2 = 1 THEN 1 = 0

  14. #14
    *Flashaholic* fyrstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northern VA, USA
    Posts
    5,831

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    The visual evidence appears to be there, but I'd rather have experimental evidence, if not the spec from the driver designer.

  15. #15
    Flashaholic* archimedes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    CONUS, arteriosus
    Posts
    3,238

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fyrstormer View Post
    The visual evidence appears to be there, but I'd rather have experimental evidence, if not the spec from the driver designer.
    Yep, me too ...
    IF 2 = 1 THEN 1 = 0

  16. #16

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    I went back and looked at my e-mails discussing this converter (back in 2009; my memory is faulty back in last month). The converter IC is rated up to 10V but other components are only good to 6.3V. The designer said that 5V USB should be fine but was concerned with some of the USB wall plug chargers which might have voltage spike. There was also some concern about noise but not elaborated on. At any rate, the light engine should be fine on 1xAAA or 2xAAA, single cell lithium primary or Li-Ion. My guess is that the IC was designed as a constant current driver probably for USB or cell phone applications and for want of a better understanding I would call it a buck/boost driver. I did confirm back then that the current to the LED did hold over a range of voltage from 1V to 5V. I suppose since we are into the details of the converter I should add that it does use a sense resistor and changing the resistor can change the output. Output current ceiling is just north of 40 mA and I was provided resistor value for a minimum of 15 mA. I don't know if the driver would be stable below 15 mA output or not. BUT, this sense resistor is really really small!!! I purchased some resistors and attempted changing them out and even with some expensive SMD soldering tweezers I killed more boards than I was successful with and came to the obvious conclusion that the sense resistor needed to be selected and installed at the time of converter manufacture. I stuck with 25 mA and refused to consider opening the door to multiple choice on output in my Sapphire offering.

    These little converters are pretty cool and certainly expensive. They cost me more from the factory than the average flashlight probably retails for!
    Build Prices .... some mods and builds (not 4 sale) "Nature can be cruel- but we don't have to be."~ Temple Grandin

  17. #17
    *Flashaholic* fyrstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northern VA, USA
    Posts
    5,831

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    Ah, yes, a USB wall charger doesn't have the same strict regulation that a computer power supply has. Also, most "transformers" operate using PWM nowadays, so unless there's a capacitor in the mix to smooth the 120V spikes, there's no telling what the reaction of sensitive electronics will be.

    It's good to know the driver can safely handle a Li-Ion cell. I imagine that information will inspire a few people to switch to Li-Ions to get a smaller form-factor, just because they can.

    It would be cool if the sense resistor could be replaced with an adjustable resistor that can be tweaked with a jeweler's screwdriver. If the unit were standing upright instead of laying down on the board, I suspect there would be room for it under the LED. It would have to be pretty small, but if the fixed-value resistor can be so small, it must not need to handle very much power, which makes the prospect of finding a small-enough variable resistor more promising.

  18. #18
    Flashaholic*
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    869

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    You could drop the effective resistance by adding a resistor on the side (in parallel) I think. If it is the super tiny component on the board, I am not going to try.

    Glad I can continue using my mini Sapphire.

    eala

  19. #19
    gunga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    4,643

    Default

    Resistance drops if added in parallel.

    Edit. Sorry, you already said that! I misread your post.

  20. #20
    Flashaholic* jumpstat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ampang, Malaysia
    Posts
    2,353

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    Frystormer,

    The warm led of the Nichia is very interesting. I like warmer leds and the best that I have is in a PD-S. I have no idea what Seoul led is in the PD, but I imagine its the standard one but colour is fantastic and with the PD reflector, its the best beam profile IMHO. So having said that, is the Nichia beam colour like the PD-S? TIA
    SF M6-R85 M3 G2D FYL G2ZL E1L McGizmo HA PD-S Ti Mule-PD BB Haiku-XP-G Inova X1
    (My Collection)


  21. #21
    *Flashaholic* fyrstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northern VA, USA
    Posts
    5,831

    Default Re: Sapphires don't just come in blue

    The Nichia DS LED I put in my Sapphire is much warmer than the Seoul P4 LED in my PD-S.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •