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Thread: What kind of batteries should I use for an LED flashlight, heavy duty or alkaline?

  1. #1

    Default What kind of batteries should I use for an LED flashlight, heavy duty or alkaline?

    The LED flashlight uses 4 AA. Also, the box says if you're not gonna use the flashlight for extended periods of time, to keep the batteries out of the flashlight to prevent leakage and other bad stuff.

    Just how long of non-usage would I want to keep the batteries out?

    Would I have this same concern with alkaline batteries since they're supposed to be (more) leak proof?

  2. #2

    Default Re: What kind of batteries should I use for an LED flashlight, heavy duty or alkaline

    HD batteries are useless, for anything. they offer no run time, no mAh etc.

    buy some Eneloop rechargeables or at minimum, quality ALKALINE batteries.
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  3. #3
    Flashaholic* pjandyho's Avatar
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    Default Re: What kind of batteries should I use for an LED flashlight, heavy duty or alkaline

    Don't bother with alkaline batteries. Why bother with a battery chemistry that couldn't supply enough current for high powered devices? And the fact that they may leak inside the light is more than enough reason to avoid them. I suggest you buy a few sets of rechargeable NiMH and a charger and be good to go. As what brucered suggested above, Sanyo Eneloop is the way to go.
    The love of light is the reason why I don't walk in darkness. But darkness has it's beauty...Sadly, my lights are much more beautiful!!
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    *Flashaholic* nbp's Avatar
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    Default Re: What kind of batteries should I use for an LED flashlight, heavy duty or alkaline

    Or at the very least, if the light will go months with little usage, buy lithium based primaries. They have a very good track record of not leaking. Energizer for example makes lithium AA and AAA cells.

  5. #5
    Flashaholic* pjandyho's Avatar
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    Default Re: What kind of batteries should I use for an LED flashlight, heavy duty or alkaline

    Quote Originally Posted by nbp View Post
    Or at the very least, if the light will go months with little usage, buy lithium based primaries. They have a very good track record of not leaking. Energizer for example makes lithium AA and AAA cells.
    Agreed. I do have Energizer lithium AA in some of my lights that see little to no usage in the last few months.
    The love of light is the reason why I don't walk in darkness. But darkness has it's beauty...Sadly, my lights are much more beautiful!!
    Beam shots Night Trekking with HDS high CRI and McGizmo Haiku & Mule high CRI

  6. #6

    Default Re: What kind of batteries should I use for an LED flashlight, heavy duty or alkaline

    Thank you for your ideas guys! Really appreciated.

  7. #7

    Default Re: What kind of batteries should I use for an LED flashlight, heavy duty or alkaline

    Quote Originally Posted by brucered View Post
    HD batteries are useless, for anything. they offer no run time, no mAh etc.

    buy some Eneloop rechargeables or at minimum, quality ALKALINE batteries.
    Could you please elaborate why? thanks!

  8. #8

    Default Re: What kind of batteries should I use for an LED flashlight, heavy duty or alkaline

    Quote Originally Posted by nbp View Post
    Or at the very least, if the light will go months with little usage, buy lithium based primaries. They have a very good track record of not leaking. Energizer for example makes lithium AA and AAA cells.
    Yeah, I agreed with Energizer. thanks!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: What kind of batteries should I use for an LED flashlight, heavy duty or alkaline

    Quote Originally Posted by lesliemorris85 View Post
    Could you please elaborate why? thanks!

    When it comes to batteries, there isn't really alot to ask of them. But the things we DO ask of batteries are quite important. Namely, people generally want:


    1. A battery that lasts a while. This is particularly important with disposable batteries (primaries) vs rechargeable batteries (secondaries), since you have to buy new ones when they go dead. And when it comes to lasting, 'heavy duty' batteries are pretty much at the bottom.


    2. A battery that can deliver high current with minimal voltage sag is also desirable. Generally, batteries that are rechargeable are better than disposable batteries when it comes to high current capability. But even among nonrechargeable batteries, 'heavy duty' batteries come up REALLY short.


    3. Stable discharge voltage is also considered desirable, especially in cheaper, nonregulated lights. A stable discharge voltage means that your light will maintain brightness as you use it rather than getting dim as the battery discharges. Again, rechargeable batteries (especially NiMH) do better in this department. And once again, 'heavy duty' batteries come out on the bottom.


    4. Maintaining capacity when heavily loaded. All batteries experience loss of capacity at higher loads vs lower loads. But some do more so than others. Once again, rechargeable batteries excel here. But even though the performance of alkaline batteries is pretty deplorable in this department, 'heavy duty' batteries are even worse.


    The bottom line? Unless all of your batteries are dead and you have NOTHING ELSE available, stay away from heavy duty batteries! Rechargeable batteries (in your case, NiMH for these lights) are generally going to give the best performance. They're also the most economical choice for a heavily used light. Alkaline batteries are not going to perform as well. And 'heavy duty' batteries are HORRIBLE. If your light uses AA or AAA batteries, Energizer L91/L92 lithiums are an option. They will give you performance that is closer to NiMH (vs alkalines). But they will last longer in an intermittently used light. However, they are expensive and nonrechargeable.
    Last edited by StorminMatt; 02-13-2013 at 11:13 PM.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: What kind of batteries should I use for an LED flashlight, heavy duty or alkaline

    also, there is outgassing of alkalines which rechargeables don't do or do but very little. i literally blew the plastic lens off the front of my AAx2 minimag due to internal pressures from outgassing alkalines - the gases were prevented from being released due to waterproofing o-rings. it went with a loud pop in the middle of the night - startled the wife but me, just kept right on snoozing.

    so maybe you should ask yourself - are you a sound or light sleeper and choose your batteries accordingly lol
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  11. #11

    Default Re: What kind of batteries should I use for an LED flashlight, heavy duty or alkaline

    Quote Originally Posted by StorminMatt View Post
    When it comes to batteries, there isn't really alot to ask of them. But the things we DO ask of batteries are quite important. Namely, people generally want:


    1. A battery that lasts a while. This is particularly important with disposable batteries (primaries) vs rechargeable batteries (secondaries), since you have to buy new ones when they go dead. And when it comes to lasting, 'heavy duty' batteries are pretty much at the bottom.


    2. A battery that can deliver high current with minimal voltage sag is also desirable. Generally, batteries that are rechargeable are better than disposable batteries when it comes to high current capability. But even among nonrechargeable batteries, 'heavy duty' batteries come up REALLY short.


    3. Stable discharge voltage is also considered desirable, especially in cheaper, nonregulated lights. A stable discharge voltage means that your light will maintain brightness as you use it rather than getting dim as the battery discharges. Again, rechargeable batteries (especially NiMH) do better in this department. And once again, 'heavy duty' batteries come out on the bottom.


    4. Maintaining capacity when heavily loaded. All batteries experience loss of capacity at higher loads vs lower loads. But some do more so than others. Once again, rechargeable batteries excel here. But even though the performance of alkaline batteries is pretty deplorable in this department, 'heavy duty' batteries are even worse.


    The bottom line? Unless all of your batteries are dead and you have NOTHING ELSE available, stay away from heavy duty batteries! Rechargeable batteries (in your case, NiMH for these lights) are generally going to give the best performance. They're also the most economical choice for a heavily used light. Alkaline batteries are not going to perform as well. And 'heavy duty' batteries are HORRIBLE. If your light uses AA or AAA batteries, Energizer L91/L92 lithiums are an option. They will give you performance that is closer to NiMH (vs alkalines). But they will last longer in an intermittently used light. However, they are expensive and nonrechargeable.
    Well said, thanks a lot for the explanation. Really appreciated.

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