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Thread: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

  1. #1

    Cool Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Warning: pic heavy, as usual!




    The T45C is a new side-by-side style 2x18650 flashlight from Sunwayman, featuring a distinctive cut-out design for the reflector/heatsink. It is remarkably compact compared to other lights in this class - let's see how it compares.

    Manufacturer Reported Specifications:
    (note: as always, these are simply what the manufacturer provides – scroll down to see my actual testing results).

    • CREE XM-L2 LED, with a lifetime of up to 50,000 hours;
    • Side switch on the top, 8 output modes:
    • Turbo: 980 Lumens (Automatically enter High mode after 5 mins continuous use to avoid overheat)
    • High: 470 Lumens (3.5hrs.)
    • Mid: 220 Lumens (10hrs.)
    • Low: 20 Lumens (130hrs.)
    • Strobe
    • SOS
    • Police Strobe
    • Slow Flash
    • Super-low Standby Current <50uA
    • Constant current circuit, constant output
    • Runtime: Turbo: 3.5hr, Lo: 130hr
    • Effective range of 278 meters
    • Intensity: 19200cd
    • Uses 2*18650 (4*CR123A/16340) batteries
    • Working voltage: 2.8~8.4V
    • High quality metal reflector maintains great throw distance and spread with an ideal beam pattern
    • Aerospace-grade aluminum alloy, Stainless Steel retaining ring on the top
    • Military Specification Type III- hard anodized body
    • Waterproof, in accordance with IPX-8 standard (2m)
    • Impact resistance: 2m
    • Ultra-clear tempered glass lens resists scratches and impacts
    • Dimensions: 41mm (head diameter) x 136mm (length)
    • Weight: 220.5g (Excluding battery)
    • Accessories: Lanyard, O-ring
    • MSRP: ~$83



    The T45C comes in a fairly standard Sunwayman hard cardboard box with packing foam. Inside you get a wrist lanyard, extra o-rings, manual and product inserts. There is no belt pouch included.




    From left to right: Rayovac CR123A; AW 18650 2200mAh; Sunwayman T45C; Fenix TK35; Rofis TR51; Eagletac SX25L3.

    All weights with no batteries installed.

    Sunwayman T45C: Weight: 216.6g, Length: 136.0mm, Width (bezel) 40.4mm, Width (widest part): 40.8mm
    Rofis TR51: Weight: 242.2g, Length: 146.7mm, Width (bezel) 45.9mm, Width (widest part): 48.1mm
    Eagletac M3C4 XM-L: Weight: 348.0g, Length: 164mm, Width: 61mm (bezel)
    Fenix TK35: Weight 256.1g, Length 162mm, Width (bezel): 48.6mm, Max Width 52.0mm
    Skilhunt DT-20: Weight 280.0g, Length: 152mm Width (bezel): 72.8mm and 36.8mm
    Sunwayman M40C: Weight: 258.5g, Length 156mm, Width (bezel) 57.1mm,
    Nitecore TM11: Weight: 342.6g (476g with 8xCR123A), Length 135.3mm, Width (bezel): 59.5mm

    The T45C is definitely compact for this class of 2x18650 side-by-side lights.






    The design of the T45Cs is certainly distinctive. The most obvious aesthetic touches are the cut-outs showing the reflector/heatsink assembly and the colored circuit/pill housing. Overall appearance reminds me of the old Nitecore Raidfire Spear, from long ago.

    But I am also impressed by the solid body construction here (i.e., seems to come from a single bar of aluminum). This has allowed Sunwayman to keep the size and weight down, without the need for connection points. It also means that they don't need to use a battery carrier, like many other 2x18650 side-by-side lights.

    Anodizing is a black matte finish on my sample, with no chips or damage – it appears to be high quality, as is common on Sunwayman lights. Labels are generally somewhat faint, but sharp against the background. There is no real knurling to speak of on the light (only the tailcap), but the various body ridge and build elements do help with grip (e.g. the cut-outs around the switch and head). I supposed it could be a bit slippery if wet, as it is not as grippy as some others in this class.

    The switch is an electronic switch, located in the head (controls both on/off and mode switching – scroll down for an interface discussion). Switch mechanism feel is typical for the class, and the button cover has a flat rubber/silicone feel.

    Tailcap uses a similar mechanism as many of my recent Eagletac lights – with a rotating base and two columns to anchor into the body (to ensure proper battery contact as you screw the tailcap on/off). The rotating column has a somewhat stiffer feel than most of my Eagletacs (which tend to spin more freely). Screw threads are anodized, allowing for physical lockout.

    The battery wells are cut wide enough that all my modern high-capacity protected 18650 cells fit inside the light. There are small contact points raised on the head plate, so true flat-top cells will work fine in the light (as well as all button tops, of course). Note that the batteries are in parallel on the T45C, unlike most other lights I've tested. That means you could run the light on a single 18650 in a pinch (or 2xCR123A/RCR).

    The light can tailstand.




    The light uses the recent Cree XM-L2 emitter, in cool white tint. Emitter was well centered at the base of a fairly deep smooth reflector. The reflector dimensions remind me of a lot of the 4xAA lights I've reviewed recently (e.g., Sunwayman D40A). Indeed, the reflector seems even deeper than the D40A. Coupled with the smooth finish here, I would thus expect reasonably good throw for the T45C.

    Scroll down for beamshots.

    User Interface

    Turn the light on by a click of the side switch (i.e., quick press and release).

    Advance modes when On by pressing-and-holding the side switch. Mode sequence is Turbo > Hi > Med > Lo, in repeating sequence. Turn off the light with a click of the switch.

    Light has mode memory, and returns to the last setting after turning off/on.

    To access the "hidden" blinky modes, you have two options. From On, double-click the switch to enter Strobe. When in Strobe, double-click again for SOS. Single click turns off the light. From Off, press-and-hold the switch to access "Police Strobe". Press-and-hold again to advance to the Beacon mode.

    Note that there is no memory for the blinky modes (i.e., the light reverts back to its previously memorized constant output modes on re-activation).

    In addition to the physical lock-out, there is an electronic "soft" lockout of the switch. Do a quick click and press-hold of the switch until the beam flickers and turns off. The light is now locked out and won't turn on - perform the same operation to unlock the light.

    Video:

    For more information on the overall build and user interface, please see my video overview:



    Video was recorded in 720p, but YouTube typically defaults to 360p or lower. Once the video is running, you can click on the configuration settings icon and select the higher 480p to 720p options. You can also run full-screen.

    As with all my videos, I recommend you have annotations turned on. I commonly update the commentary with additional information or clarifications before publicly releasing the video.

    PWM/Strobe

    There is no evidence of pulse width modulation (PWM) the Med/Hi/Turbo modes – the light seems to be current controlled.

    There is a strong signal spike detectable on the lowest level in my setup, around 2.7 kHz, with a secondary pattern at longer time scales:

    Lo Mode:



    It is hard to know what to make of this – I suspect this signal is a circuit noise, but I can't easily distinguish PWM from noise at such low outputs. The reason for that is PWM pulse widths would be exceedingly short at such a low level, which could look like a simple spike. Either way, 2.7 kHz is high enough that you won't see it visually (except when shining on a fast fan, for example). Not a problem in actual use, the light should appear flicker-free.

    Strobe:


    Strobe is a fairly typical 12Hz in my testing.

    "Police Strobe" (including blow-up):



    "Police Strobe" is basically three rapid strobe pulses (at 12 Hz freq), repeated every ~1.75 secs or so. I presume this is intended as some sort of signaling strobe, to make people aware of your presence.

    SOS:


    The T45C has a relatively quick SOS mode.

    Slow Flash:


    Slow flash is basically a very slow strobe, where the light is on for ~1.2 secs, off for ~1.2 secs.

    Standby Drain

    Due to the electronic control switch, the T45C will always be drawing a current when the tailcap is fully connected. I have measured this current on my sample as 97 uA. Given the 1s2p arrangement, that means that 2x3100mAh cells would last for about 7.3 years before being completely depleted.

    In any case, if you are concerned about this minimal current (or worried about accidental activation), you can store the light without the tailcap fully screwed on.

    Beamshots:

    And now, what you have all been waiting for. All lights are on AW protected 18650 2200mAh batteries. Lights are about ~0.75 meter from a white wall (with the camera ~1.25 meters back from the wall). Automatic white balance on the camera, to minimize tint differences. This means that you can draw no conclusion about relative tint differences below.













    Due to the relatively deep reflector, the T45C has a "throwier" beam than most 2x18650 side-by-side light. It also has a narrower spillbeam than typical for the class.

    In terms of beam pattern, the relatively tight hotspot and broad corona of the T45C is very similar to the Fenix TK35 – it is just that the T45C has a narrower overall spillbeam width.

    To show you that better, let's take a look at outdoor shots. These are done in the style of my earlier 100-yard round-up review. Please see that thread for a discussion of the topography (i.e. the road dips in the distance, to better show you the corona in the mid-ground).




    First thing to notice – there really isn't much a throw or output difference between my XM-L2-equipped T45C and my first generation Fenix TK35 (XM-L T6). Aside from the narrow spillbeam width on the T45C, the beams look pretty much the same (scroll down to my output tables for a direct comparison).

    This suggests to me that newer TK35s (with higher output bins) may have a slight output edge over the T45C.

    UPDATE NOVEMBER 5, 2013: In case you were wondering, here is how the T45C compares to the Sunwayman D40A (4xAA, Cool White version). As you will see, there really isn't much of a beam pattern difference between these lights - as you would expect, based on their physical characteristics and my output/throw measures.





    Testing Method:

    All my output numbers are relative for my home-made light box setup, as described on my flashlightreviews.ca website. You can directly compare all my relative output values from different reviews - i.e. an output value of "10" in one graph is the same as "10" in another. All runtimes are done under a cooling fan, except for any extended run Lo/Min modes (i.e. >12 hours) which are done without cooling.

    I have devised a method for converting my lightbox relative output values (ROV) to estimated Lumens. See my How to convert Selfbuilt's Lightbox values to Lumens thread for more info.

    Throw/Output Summary Chart:

    My summary tables are reported in a manner consistent with the ANSI FL-1 standard for flashlight testing. Please see http://www.flashlightreviews.ca/FL1.htm for a discussion, and a description of all the terms used in these tables. Effective July 2012, I have updated all my Peak Intensity/Beam Distance measures with a NIST-certified Extech EA31 lightmeter (orange highlights).



    My T45C does not seem to be as heavily-driven as the Sunwayman output specs would indicate. As you saw in the beamshots above, there's really no difference in max output or throw of my T45C compared to my earlier TK35 (XM-L) and Rofis TR51 (XM-L). The low mode is also very consistent with those two lights as well.

    Let's see how my output measures compare to the specs:



    Aside from the max mode, my output estimates seem somewhat consistent with Sunwayman specs.

    Output/Runtime Comparison:









    As you saw in the Summary tables, initial output on Max is very similar to the XM-L-based Fenix TK35, Eagletac M3C4, Olight SR51, and Rofis TR51. The T45C steps down after 3 mins on Max, and to a lower level than typical among lights with a timed step-down. As a result, it's a bit hard to directly compare the Max mode runtimes.

    In terms of comparison of the Med/Hi modes, you can see the T45C has a bit of an efficiency edge over the TK35 or Rofis TR51 for comparable output – presumably reflecting the higher output bin of its XM-L2 emitter.

    The overall performance above indicates that the T45C has the regulation and output/runtime efficiency of a good current-controlled circuit.

    Potential Issues

    The cut-outs in the head are mainly for aesthetic appeal. There is a possibility that dirt and debris could accumulate here, so you will want to clean periodically if subjected to heavy outdoor use.

    Max output of my sample is slightly lower than expected – closer to a typical XM-L light in this class.

    Hand feel and ergonomics are very good on the light, although grip could be enhanced further with some actual body knurling.

    Light can roll very easy, unless you attach a wrist lanyard.

    There is a reoccurring circuit signal on the lowest mode, but this is at a high enough frequency to not be visually noticeable (2.7 kHz).

    Preliminary Observations

    The T45C is a good-performing member of the 2x18650 side-by-side family of lights. It is the smallest light I've seen in this class to date, and one of the most aesthetically interesting. It also has a very high quality "hand feel", with excellent attention to detail.

    Physically, the T45C's cut-outs remind me a lot of the old Raidfire Spear, or more recent Olight SR95/96-series lights. But what really impresses me is the compact form, built out of a single bar of aluminum. This means that you have none of the contact points (with multiple screws, o-rings, etc.) that are needed to maintain structural integrity and waterproofeness in other 2x18650 side-by-side lights. But thanks to cut-outs here, you are relying on the internal connectors of the reflector/heatsink and circuit/pill casing for water resistance.

    Sunwayman has thoughtfully engineered a lot of "wiggle room" inside the battery well cut-outs, and all my large high-capacity protected cells fit and worked fine in the light. This is something I identified as issues on a number of competing lights in this class (either for length, width, or button style restrictions).

    The parallel cell arrangement is a bit different – but it means that the T45C can easily support 4xRCR (something most lights in this category can't). And thankfully, there is no battery carrier to worry about here. It also means you can run the light on 1x18650 (or 2xCR123A/RCR).

    Also different from many 2x18650 lights is the sole electronic side switch in the head (i.e., no physical tailcap clicky). This provides a simplified interface, but the T45C does have a couple more extra "hidden" strobes than mode lights. Frankly, I prefer this interface over the more complex dual-switch Sunwayman T21CS – although would like to see a Lo > Turbo mode sequence instead here.

    As with the other Sunwayman lights I've tested, the regulation pattern and output/runtime efficiency of the current-controlled circuit was excellent. Performance is very similar to my Fenix TK35 and Rofis TR51 lights, with a bump in runtime thanks to the higher output bin used here.

    One thing I did find a bit surprising is that max output on my sample is really no higher than my earlier XM-L based Fenix TK35 or Rofis TR51. This may reflect the parallel cell arrangement here (i.e., the T45C circuit functions more like a 1x18650 light in its output levels) – or it could be that my sample is an unusually low performer. Certainly not a problem, as I find the ~800 or so estimated lumens here to be more than plenty in actual use. And the plus side is that you could run the light pretty comfortably on 1x18650, with standard chemistry cells (i.e., wouldn't need to resort to IMR for the max mode).

    Beam pattern is very good for a light this size, with nearly identical throw to my TK35 and TR51 – although spillbeam width is a bit narrower on the T45C. On the plus side, beam tint was a fairly premium cool white on my T45C (something I can't say for my old TK35).

    What it all comes down to is that there probably isn't much to make you want to "upgrade" to the T45C from one of those existing lights (if they work well for you). But all the build features and updates in the T45C make this a highly competitive choice - it has one of highest quality builds I've seen in the compact 2x18650 space, with a good functional feature set.

    ----

    T45C provided by Sunwayman for review.
    Last edited by selfbuilt; 11-05-2013 at 07:37 AM.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. New: Selfbuilt's Summer Sale!
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  2. #2
    Flashaholic y260's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    I know I'm not suppose to pay attention to tint in your beam-shots, but wow the T45C looks to have a beautifully neutral-white beam. It also seems completely artifact-free.

  3. #3
    Flashaholic* Ryp's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Thanks for the review! In your graph you have it listed as T45CS
    Last edited by Ryp; 10-25-2013 at 12:19 PM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Quote Originally Posted by y260 View Post
    I know I'm not suppose to pay attention to tint in your beam-shots, but wow the T45C looks to have a beautifully neutral-white beam. It also seems completely artifact-free.
    That's just the camera's auto-white balance - the main emitter is a typical cool white emitter.

    But I agree the profile seems pretty much artifact free.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryp View Post
    Thanks for the review! In your graph you have it listed as T45CS
    Thanks, I'll fix that table when I get the chance.
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  5. #5
    ven's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Thanks for another amazing review,what a beautiful light,love the design....i know the cosmetic side is not the be all and end all,but when i spend my pennies i want it looking nice in my hand

    My list grows as i am yet to own a sunwayman and they look all of a very high standard.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Dimensions look very similar to Olight M22. Do you still have one? Is it really as small as 1x18650 light?

  7. #7
    Flashaholic* zespectre's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    I find this design really aesthetically pleasing.
    I want one of these for the simple reason that I think it's really pretty.
    Wallet still says NOT RIGHT NOW BUDDY <sigh>.
    "Notorious collector of things that glow, shine, or blink"
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  8. #8

    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Quote Originally Posted by phantom23 View Post
    Dimensions look very similar to Olight M22. Do you still have one? Is it really as small as 1x18650 light?
    Well, the hand feel is quite different - it's only the overall length and bezel diameter that is comparable. The body of the M22 is much narrower, and overall weight (batteries loaded) is much lower. With 2x18650 installed, the T45C is ~75% heavier than the 1x18650 M22.

    That said, the T45C is pretty comfortable in the hand. I'm amazed at how much smaller it is than the TK35 or M3C4.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. New: Selfbuilt's Summer Sale!
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  9. #9

    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Do you still have your M22? If so, can you please make side by side picture? Thanks.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Ok, here you go:



    Keep in mind the weight difference fully loaded with cells though ... you should add ~47g per 18650 cell to my non-battery measurements in the reviews.
    Last edited by selfbuilt; 10-26-2013 at 01:54 PM.
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  11. #11
    Flashaholic* zespectre's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    STOP THAT...MY WALLET CAN'T AFFORD ONE RIGHT NOW!!!!! <grin>
    "Notorious collector of things that glow, shine, or blink"
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  12. #12
    *Flashaholic* Capolini's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Nice review. The torch looks nice! I like the looks of it.

    However, the frustration is still there!!

    As usual [for me!], it is very difficult to find a light[ in these classes] like the TK-35[I have the new version] that is able to sustain full output for the duration of the battery charge. Of course, that is minus a few seconds for the 25 minute "timed step downs"!

    Thank God not everyone likes Turbo/full output continuously like me!
    A resentment is a cancer that eats us away from the inside and is portrayed by our attitude from the outside. Capolini-6.4.2003
    Physical beauty temporarily satisfies the eye. Inner beauty is eternal and nurtures the soul. Capolini-7.23.2017









  13. #13

    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Quote Originally Posted by selfbuilt View Post
    Ok, here you go:



    Keep in mind the weight difference fully loaded with cells though ... you should add ~47g per 18650 cell to my non-battery measurements in the reviews.
    Thanks for the pic. I don't mind the weight and now I have even bigger problem - T45C is smaller than I thought (or M22 is bigger). Now I have tough time choosing between M22, T45C and SRT6. They're all smallish XM-L2 flashlights with still decent throw and at similar price. Decisions, decisions...

  14. #14

    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Update: In case you were wondering, here is how the T45C compares to the Sunwayman D40A (4xAA, Cool White version). As you will see, there really isn't much of a beam pattern difference between these lights - as you would expect, based on their physical characteristics and my output/throw measures.



    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. New: Selfbuilt's Summer Sale!
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  15. #15
    Unenlightened
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    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Great review, I really love the look of this flashlight. Is the max turbo step-down 3 or 5 minutes as I see specs say 5 minutes, but your review says 3 minutes? I'm just wondering when they are going to come out with a mt-g2 version!

  16. #16

    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Quote Originally Posted by cpfdemigod View Post
    Great review, I really love the look of this flashlight. Is the max turbo step-down 3 or 5 minutes as I see specs say 5 minutes, but your review says 3 minutes? I'm just wondering when they are going to come out with a mt-g2 version!
    Mine stepped down sometime around 3 to 3.5 minutes on max. I didn't time it exactly, but I can tell from the runtime data that it was in that range.

    I agree an MT-G2 edition would be nice, but it would have to be driven lower than the 3x/4x18650 MT-G2 lights (e.g., something more like the Crelant 7G5MT).
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. New: Selfbuilt's Summer Sale!
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  17. #17
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    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    I love my t45c. Get you one. ... you won't be disappointed!

  18. #18
    Enlightened PaladinNO's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sunwayman T45C (XM-L2 - 2x18650, 4xCR123A/RCR) Review: RUNTIMES, BEAMS, VIDEO+

    Edit:
    First off: Pardon the EXTREME necro. I don't know what the common consensus is on such things here. Even when the added posts are relevant.


    Sunwayman is a new brand to me, but I just picked up 1x Sunwayman T45C for $34.95 under a "flash" (pun intended?) sale.
    I don't in any way need it, but I don't have a dual-18650 light yet, and the price made it to good to pass up on.

    For me, with 2x 18650, I see extended runtimes at lower levels, where I expect I will be keeping it. Whether or not it will actually see any real use, only time will tell.
    Pity about the "no holster included" though. I don't think I have anything laying around that will fit this thing. Does anyone know of a suitable holster with a belt-loop?
    Last edited by PaladinNO; 10-10-2017 at 04:20 PM.

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