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Thread: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VIDEO+

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    *Flashaholic* selfbuilt's Avatar
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    Smile Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VIDEO+

    Warning: pic heavy, as usual.




    Thrunite has updated their original compact, high-output 1x18650/2xCR123A light – the TN12, first released in 2011 - with a new model for 2014.

    This updated build features a dual-switch interface, and the latest XM-L2 emitter. Based on the specs, it promises to be a real scorcher for this class – let's see how it does compared to the competition under objective testing conditions.

    For additional general comments on how several of the current dual-switch lights in this battery class compare, please see my post #2.

    Manufacturer Reported Specifications:
    (note: as always, these are simply what the manufacturer provides – scroll down to see my actual testing results).

    • LED: Cree XM-L2 U2
    • Max Lumen: 1050
    • Uses one 18650 rechargeable battery or two CR123A batteries.
    • Output/Runtime: Turbo 1050lumens / 90 min – Hi 800lumens / 1hr 30min – Med 280lumens / 5hr – Lo 20lumens / 74hr – Firefly 0.3lumens / 1585hr (Reviewer's note: if you are wondering why the runtime specs on Hi and Turbo are the same, please see my testing later in this review)
    • Working voltage: 2.7V-9V
    • Beam Intensity: 11,866cd
    • Impact Resistant: 1.5m
    • Waterproof: IPX-8, 2m
    • Body specifically designed for better single hand operation and a new emitter (XM-L2 U2) to supply more beam with throw and flood.
    • Reverse polarity protection design to protect from improper battery installation
    • Aircraft-grade aluminum body
    • Premium Type III hard-anodized anti-abrasive finish
    • Toughened ultra-clear glass lens with anti-reflective coating
    • Smooth reflector gives perfect beam and throw.
    • Dimensions: 143mm (Length)*25.4mm (Diameter)
    • Weight: 82g weight (without batteries)
    • MSRP: ~$46



    Packaging is a hard cardboard box with packing foam. Inside, included with the light are spare O-rings, basic wrist lanyard, holster with Velcro closing flap, pocket clip (attached), and manual.




    From left to right: AW Protected 18650 2200mAh; Thrunite TN12-2014; Nitecore P12; Fenix PD35; Thrunite TN12 2011; Olight S20 2014; Sunwayman C21C; Foursevens; Zebralight SC600-II; Eagletac D25LC2.

    All dimensions directly measured, and given with no batteries installed:

    Thrunite TN12-2014: Weight: 80.0g, Length: 140.5mm, Width (bezel): 25.4mm
    Thrunite TN12-2011: Weight: 64.0g, Length: 126.9mm, Width (bezel): 24.1mm
    Eagletac D25LC2: Weight: 50.0g, Length: 116.3mm, Width (bezel): 22.5mm
    Eagletac TX25C2: Weight 93.6g, Length: 120.4mm, Width (bezel): 31.6mm
    Fenix PD35: Weight: 82.7g, Length: 138.1mm, Width (bezel): 25.4mm
    Foursevens MMR-X: Weight 90.8g, Weight (with 18650): 138.5g, Length: 138.6mm, Width (bezel): 31.5mm
    Foursevens MMX Burst: Weight 145.8g, Length: 153.3mm, Width (bezel): 38.7mm
    Nitecore P12: Weight: 89.7g, Length: 139.4mm, Width (bezel): 25.4mm
    Olight M20S-X: Weight: 124.1g, Length: 145.4mm, Width: 35.5mm (head)
    Zebralight SC600 II: Weight 79.3g, Length: 101.8mm, Width (bezel) 29.7mm

    The TN12-2014 is longer than its predecessor model, likely due to the revised electronics and secondary switch in the head. It is still within the same range of other recent dual-switch lights in this class.






    Anodizing is a glossy black finish, hard anodized, with no chips or damage on my sample. Body labels are minimal and subtle against the black background (i.e., sort of a light gray). Knurling is of mild aggressiveness on the body tube and tailcap, and the head is smooth as well. This overall smoothness gives an impression of lower hand feel, when comparing to some other recent lights in this class. But when combined all the other grip elements (e.g., side switch cover, pocket clip, etc.), I would describe overall grip as ok The clip is helpful as an anti-roll feature, as the light rolls fairly easily otherwise.

    Tailcap screw threads are now square-cut and anodized for lock-out at either end of the body tube. Although there are a good number of screw threads at the head-end of the battery tube, there are fewer at the tailcap end (although still more than sufficient).

    The TN12-2014 uses a forward clicky switch as before, but I find tailstanding has improved (i.e., was pretty wobbly on my original 2011 sample).

    On/off is still controlled by the physical tailcap clicky switch, but all mode switching is now done by the electronic side switch in the head (instead of the old twisty interface). The new mode-changing switch in the head has a bit of "squishy" feel for my tastes (i.e., not as much of a defined click as some others). But it is relatively easy to locate by feel. Please see my User Interface section for a discussion.

    There is a spring on the contact board in the head, so flat-top cells can be used. The reverse polarity protection system must be circuit based, not physical. The body tube is wide enough to accommodate all size 18650 cells, but you may find really long cells under tight pressure with the dual springs.




    The overall head is typical for this class. Reflector is smooth, and fairly deep given this size head. Coupled with the XM-L2 cool white emitter (which was well centered on my sample), I would expect a fairly typical beam pattern. Scroll down for beamshots.

    The TN12-2014 comes with a flat black aluminum bezel, as before.

    User Interface

    The original TN12 -2011 used a clicky switch for on/off, and head-twists to control output levels. The new TN12 for 2014 uses a dual-switch interface, similar to the Fenix PD35 and Nitecore P12.

    As before, turn the light on/off by the forward tailcap switch. Lightly press and hold for momentary, click (press and release) for constant on. Click again to turn off.

    To change modes, click the electronic switch in the head, while the light on. Mode sequence is Firefly > Lo > Med > Hi > Turbo, in repeating sequence. The light has mode memory, and returns the last level set after turning the tail switch off/on.

    Press and hold the electronic switch to access a tactical Strobe mode. A single click exits you from Strobe back into constant output.

    Video:

    For information on the light, including the build and user interface, please see my video overview:



    Video was recorded in 720p, but YouTube typically defaults to 360p. Once the video is running, you can click on the configuration settings icon and select the higher 480p to 720p options. You can also run full-screen.

    As with all my videos, I recommend you have annotations turned on. I commonly update the commentary with additional information or clarifications before publicly releasing the video.

    PWM/Strobe

    Like the earlier TN12, the new TN12-2014 is fully current-controlled. There is no PWM, on any level. I detect some very faint low frequency noise on the Med and Hi modes of my TN12-2014 sample, but this was completely invisible in actual use.

    Med/Hi Noise:


    Again, consistent with my standard review policy, I report on any oscilloscope signals I can detect in the output of a light. But I can assure you that the above pattern produces no visible effect – even when shining on a fan. The TN12-2014 is fully "flicker-free" at all levels.

    Strobe


    The strobe was a fast "tactical" strobe, of 12.8Hz frequency.

    There are no additional blinky modes on the TN12-2014.

    Beamshots:

    For white-wall beamshots below, all lights are on Max output on an AW protected 18650 battery. Lights are about ~0.75 meter from a white wall (with the camera ~1.25 meters back from the wall). Automatic white balance on the camera, to minimize tint differences.













    Beam pattern is what you would expect for a light this size – a wide spillbeam, but with reasonably good throw. Initial max output on turbo is incredibly bright, as indicated by the specs – scroll down for detailed output and throw measures.

    Testing Method:

    All my output numbers are relative for my home-made light box setup, as described on my flashlightreviews.ca website. You can directly compare all my relative output values from different reviews - i.e. an output value of "10" in one graph is the same as "10" in another. All runtimes are done under a cooling fan, except for any extended run Lo/Min modes (i.e. >12 hours) which are done without cooling.

    I have devised a method for converting my lightbox relative output values (ROV) to estimated Lumens. See my How to convert Selfbuilt's Lightbox values to Lumens thread for more info.

    Throw/Output Summary Chart:

    My summary tables are reported in a manner consistent with the ANSI FL-1 standard for flashlight testing. Please see http://www.flashlightreviews.ca/FL1.htm for a discussion, and a description of all the terms used in these tables. Effective July 2012, I have updated all my Peak Intensity/Beam Distance measures with a NIST-certified Extech EA31 lightmeter (orange highlights).







    The TN12-2014 is indeed driven very hard on Turbo, as demonstrated by the specs. In fact, it tops my charts just slightly above the Zebrealight SC600-II and Fenix PD35. The original TN12-2011 was heavily driven for its class and time as well, but this new TN12-2014 is impressively bright. Note as well that it is even brighter on max on 2x battery sources than 1x18650.

    Throw is quite reasonable for the class, given the size of the head and reflector.

    Let's see how all the levels compare to the official specs, on 1x18650 in my lightbox:



    There is a generally good concordance between my estimated lumens and Thrunite published specs. And as always, you have to consider my estimated lumens as a of source relative measures between lights (i.e., not to be taken as absolute values).

    One thing I am happy to see here is the true "firefly" Lo mode (i.e., I'm a fan of ultra-low output levels, for when you have dark-adapted eyes). Nice to see such a wide range outputs in a general purpose flashlight.

    Output/Runtime Graphs:

    To start, here is a comparison of four of my highest output recent lights in this class; the Zebralight SC600-II, Fenix PD35, Nitecore P12, and Thrunite TN12-2014:




    Given the incredibly high drive level of the TN12-2014, it is not surprising that it has a direct-drive-like pattern on Max. The alternative approach - taken by the other makers shown above - is to have a defined step-down on Turbo/Max. You can see this in the initial timed step-down on the Fenix PD35 and Nitecore P12, and the full thermal-controlled step-down on the Zebralight SC600-II. Either way, it just isn't possible for these small lights to maintain that sort of output (and heat) on a single 18650 in a fully regulated fashion.

    The TN12-2014 has a defined Hi mode that is just a bit lower than Turbo. You can see a period of flat regulation before dropping into a direct-drive-like pattern. As a result, runtime is not that different (i.e., the common 90 min ANSI-FL1 spec for time to 10% output seems quite reasonable). Note that the TN12-2014 is fully flat regulated at Med and all lover levels.

    Let's see how it does on 1x18650 against a wider range of lights (omitting the comparisons already shown above):





    The TN12-2014 is clearly a very efficient model on Max/Hi compared to the competition (as you would expect, given the largely direct-drive pattern).

    Its performance on Med is pretty much unchanged from the original TN12. That puts the TN12-2014 at the lower end of recent current-controlled lights in this category, but still quite reasonable.

    Here are a couple of comparisons on 2x battery sources:





    I have only done max output runtimes on 2x sources, but you can see that the TN12-2014 runs with far more flat output (thanks to the higher voltage of the two cells). It is also slightly brighter than 1x18650 initially.

    Note that I do NOT recommend you run the TN12-2014 on Max on 2xCR123A/RCR for any sustained period of time. You are likely to trip the PTC protection features of primary CR123A (due to heat build up), and it is not healthy for small capacity protected RCRs to be drained this quickly (i.e., likely exceeds the 3C discharge current for ICR chemistry Li-ion).

    To explain a bit further, here is a comparison runtime using quality made-in-China and made-in-the-USA brand CR123As in the TN12-2014, on Turbo



    What you are looking at on the USA brand run is engagement of the PTC circuit approximately 6 mins into the runtime. I started a thread on this behavior (in another light) some time ago, and discussed it further in my last CR123A battery shoot-out review. Basically, the point is that once the battery temperature reaches a certain threshold (which varies according to the battery manufacturer), the PTC resistance rises and current limitation kicks in, causing a rapid drop in output. Over time, the temperature drops and the cells recover, showing an uptick in output.

    Based on my continued battery testing, I have found that the PTCs of made-in-the-USA cells are more likely to trip earlier than made-in-China cells (even quality ones). Keep in mind all my runtimes are done under a cooling fan for safety and consistency reasons – if I had run the China cells without fan cooling, I am confident they would have tripped as well. As a result, in the real world, I suspect all quality CR123A with PTCs will engage eventually on sustained Turbo runs on the TN12-2014.

    Potential Issues

    Consistent with the high drive level and incredibly bright max output, the TN12-2014 shows a direct-drive-like pattern on Max. This is an alternative to having a defined step-down, as some sort of output reduction is required given the high heat produced at these drive levels. The light is partially-regulated in the Hi mode (but with equivalent runtime to Turbo), and is fully regulated at lower levels.

    Output is well regulated on Max on 2x battery sources, but I don't recommend you subject CR123A or RCR cells to such excessively high discharge currents - certainly not for any sustained period. You don't want to be pushing cells to the point where their built-in safety circuits have to engage.

    The light has a relatively smooth finish for this class (thus reducing grip), and rolls easily in bare form. Grip is acceptable with the pocket clip installed.

    Preliminary Observations

    The new TN12 for 2014 builds on the previous 2011 model, and introduces new features consistent with other lights in this 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR class – like the dual-switch interface. It is also one of the best deals in this class (by MSRP), for the feature set.

    Let's start with the build – despite the relative low cost, quality of construction seems good. The new TN12 is a solid light, with the typical features and range of bundled extras in this class. Finish is a bit smooth compared to some of the competing models out there though, leading to a lower subjective build quality "feel". Still, the ergonomics are good (especially with the pocket clip attached), and you have reasonable access to the tailswitch (while maintaining tailstanding).

    The user interface very intuitive, with the dual physical tailcap switch and side mode-changing electronic switch. The side switch sticks out more than most others, which is good for locating by touch. That said, I find the switch feel itself to be a bit "squishy" (i.e., less of a defined click), compared to some others.

    One thing that distinguishes the TN12-2014 is its range of output modes – it currently has both the lower Min and the highest Max output of any dual-switch light I've tested. It also has good relative spacing of levels in between. Note for those of you who are strobe fans, there is only one hidden "tactical" strobe available (not memorizable).

    The circuit also performed admirably in my testing. Unlike some of the competition, the TN12-2014 is not flat-regulated with step-down at the highest level – instead, there is a more gradual drop-off in output. The point is that every light in this class will have to lower output somehow over time on Turbo – these lights are just too small (and too heavily driven) to handle that sort of heat for extended periods.

    Beam pattern is good as well, with a nice balance between throw and spill. Given the fairly standard size head, there are lots of beam shaping accessories out there from a range of makers that will fit on the light.

    It's mind-boggling to me to see small lights like this that can now put out over 1000 lumens (at least initially) on a single 18650. The original TN12 was a real retina-scorcher for this class when it came out, and the new TN12 picks up the gauntlet for 2014. The TN12-2014 currently tops my charts for initial max output (but the Zebralight SC600-II and PD35 are not far behind).

    The TN12-2014 represents very good value in this class of flashlight. I really like the ultra-low Firefly level (very helpful for dark-adapted eyes). Certainly a top contender to consider.

    P.S.: I know a lot people are wondering how the Fenix PD35, Nitecore P12 and Thrunite TN12-2014 directly compare to each other. In addition to all the objectives measures included in this review, I've added some general comparison comments in post #2.

    -----

    TN12-2014 provided by Thrunite for review.
    Last edited by selfbuilt; 02-27-2015 at 01:53 PM.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
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  2. #2
    *Flashaholic* selfbuilt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    I have just posted detailed individual reviews of Fenix PD35, Nitecore P12 and Thrunite TN12-2014. Since the lights are all very similar, the decision most of you have will be which one to get.

    To help with that, here are direct comparisons of key features of the lights, to allow you to better choose the one that is right for you. Please see the table/figures in the review for more info.

    Overall Build Quality and "Feel": The PD35 has most solid build in my estimation, with the most "grippy" overall hand feel and the best built-in anti-roll feature. The P12 is a close second on most of these measures, whereas the TN12-2014 has the smoothest body (contributing to a lower hand "feel" on this model, compared to the others). The pocket clip works well on all three models (note that the PD35 has the stiffest clip retention).

    Switch "Feel" and Access: The P12 has significantly easier access to the tailswitch, relative to the PD35 and TN12-2014 (which are roughly equivalent to each other). This is odd, as it is only the P12 and TN12-2014 that allow tailstanding out of the box. That said, the PD35 has the best electronic side switch feel, with the most definite "click" - followed closely by the P12. The TN12-2014 has the "softest" side switch feel, but is the easiest to find by touch alone, as it is more raised than the other two. Note that only the P12 has a low-voltage and battery read-out LED located under the side switch.

    Constant Output Modes: The TN12-2014 has the widest range of outputs, from ~0.2 lumens to >1000 lumens, with five well-spaced levels. The PD35 has five good levels as well, but lacks a true moonlight mode (i.e., from ~11 to ~1000 lumens range). The P12 has a good range from ~0.8 lumens to ~900 lumens, but only four levels (i.e., could use an extra Med-Hi mode).

    Blinking modes: Only the P12 has additional modes beyond tactical strobe (i.e., SOS and Beacon). All three lights have the additional mode(s) "hidden" behind a press-hold of the side switch, but only the P12 allows you to memorize the tactical strobe mode (i.e., can return to strobe from Off).

    Beam Pattern: The TN12-2014 and PD35 have similar wide spill beams, with the P12 slightly narrower. The P12 and TN12-2014 have roughly equivalent peak center-beam throw, with the PD35 having a bit less. The PD35 also has the widest hotspot, with the smoothest transition (i.e., least defined hotspot edge, and could thus be consider the "floodiest" of the three). Beam quality is pretty good on all of them, although the PD35 probably the most consistently "clean" beam, due to its slightly shallower reflector (i.e., slightly less likely to have beam rings and artifacts).

    Circuit Efficiency and Regulation: All three lights are current-controlled, and highly efficient. The PD35 and P12 have more consistently flat regulation at all levels on all batteries – but have defined step-downs from their max levels. The PD35 is probably the most efficient pick, but performance is very close among all three. Note that I do not recommend you run the TN12-2014 on its max level on 2xCR123A/RCR for sustained periods, as there is no step down on this model. Please see the runtime graphs in this review for more info.

    Reverse-Polarity Detection: The PD35 and TN12-2014 have electronic reverse-polarity protection, and P12 has a physical one. However, the P12 positive terminal has been re-designed to allow all type of button-top cells to be used (i.e., wide button as well as small – it is just true flat-tops that won't work in the P12).

    Package and Accessories: Bundled extras are pretty similar across the three models (and fairly basic for the holsters and wrist lanyards). Note the P12 comes with an additional grip ring. The lights all share a common sized head, so standard beam shaping accessories from any one maker should fit pretty well on the others.

    Value: The TN12-2014 has the lowest manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP), the PD35 has the highest, with the P12 is right in the middle. This relative order matches my general "hand feel" experience, but you will have to make your own assessment as to perceived value depending on all the characteristics above.

    And there you have it - there is no clear knock-down winner is any category. All three lights are similar overall, with each one specialized in some areas over the others. I recommend you pick based on which constellation of characteristics above matters the most to you.

    P.S.: As an aside, I did a blind "taste preference" of the three models with Mrs Selfbuilt. This was based solely on her physical and visual assessment of the lights and their beams, as we didn't get into circuit testing or price. She was initially drawn to the PD35 for its grippier hand feel, higher perceived build quality, and smoothest beam pattern. However, lack of a true low mode and inability to tailstand (despite reduced tailswitch access) led her to ultimately choose the P12 as the best overall candidate. She was similarly able to accurately rank the lights by estimated price, but felt that the difference between the three models was not as great as the prices would suggest (based solely on a bulid assessment). She felt that a regular person would be amazed by what any of these lights can do, and would be happy with any of them.
    Last edited by selfbuilt; 03-04-2014 at 10:51 AM.
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  3. #3
    Flashaholic* Ryp's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Thanks for the review!

  4. #4

    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    As always, AWESOME review and very useful data points. Just got this light and absolutely love it. Moreso now that I've seen the real world output figures. Thanks!

  5. #5
    *Flashaholic* selfbuilt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by nickdizonc View Post
    As always, AWESOME review and very useful data points. Just got this light and absolutely love it. Moreso now that I've seen the real world output figures. Thanks!
    Yes, it is quite a scorcher on max. I suspect that will be appealing to many. But in practice, the difference between the max modes of the 3 models is not really noticeable (i.e., it's typically only ~10% lumen difference, with the TN12-2014 at the top). The variation in hotspot focusing may be more noticeable in actual use (especially at a distance).
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  6. #6

    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Thanks for the review. Once again Thurnite maintains excellent bang for the buck.

  7. #7
    *Flashaholic* selfbuilt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by gkbain View Post
    Thanks for the review. Once again Thurnite maintains excellent bang for the buck.
    Yes, the comment came up on my youtube page as well that the TN12 is priced remarkably low for what you are getting. I can only imagine they are trying to build up some interest. It certainly seems to be an outstanding value at the current price.
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  8. #8
    Flashaholic* D6859's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    I was actually waiting for this review. Thank you very much! TN12 will be my first 18650 light

  9. #9

    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by selfbuilt View Post

    Note that I do NOT recommend you run the TN12-2014 on Max on 2xCR123A/RCR for any sustained period of time. You are likely to trip the PTC protection features of primary CR123A (due to heat build up), and it is not healthy for small capacity protected RCRs to be drained this quickly (i.e., likely exceeds the 3C discharge current for ICR chemistry Li-ion).
    I guess this explains the issue I was having with my AW RCR's... (which I documented in the previous review from Flash Lion) whereby they wouldn't power the TN12 on turbo for more than about 1 minute before "tripping" and shutting off. I documented the incident 3x (making sure it happened each time) and called it a day.

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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by RBWNY View Post
    I guess this explains the issue I was having with my AW RCR's... (which I documented in the previous review from Flash Lion) whereby they wouldn't power the TN12 on turbo for more than about 1 minute before "tripping" and shutting off. I documented the incident 3x (making sure it happened each time) and called it a day.
    Yes, the sustained high drain on 2x cells is hard on the cells. I suspect the drain exceeds ICR chemistry specs for standard protected Li-ion cells (ie. 3C). You might be yet off with IMR cells for drain characteristics (but unfortunately, they are not protected). I always recommend protected cells in multi cell setups ... so 18650 is likely the "sweet spot" for this light.
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  11. #11

    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by selfbuilt View Post
    You might be yet off with IMR cells for drain characteristics (but unfortunately, they are not protected).
    Okay...that's what I was going to ask next! My IMR 18350's seem to work okay on turbo...(and as you pointed out), I try to be careful when using them due to the unprotected nature of the cells.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    awesome bang for the buck! thanks for the brilliant review as always.

    how does it compare with the SC600 L2? I understand the zebra is much shorter, has PID, a much more advanced switch, costs more than the double and one every two is faulty thanks to excellent zebra quality control (I got 2 SC600L2 both defective, both functionally AND esthetically - for that price! bye bye zebra). but what about the beams, I guess the TN12 has (little?) more throw but is (little?) less floody?
    Last edited by Fra881; 03-07-2014 at 04:07 PM.

  13. #13
    *Flashaholic* selfbuilt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    The SC600 II definitely has a more floody beam. If you pull up the white wall beamshots from that review, you can directly compare to the ones here (taken under the same conditions).
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  14. #14

    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by selfbuilt View Post
    The SC600 II definitely has a more floody beam. If you pull up the white wall beamshots from that review, you can directly compare to the ones here (taken under the same conditions).
    however I don't see much of a difference in throw, I mean 206m vs 219m is more or less the same. or is actual throw difference bigger? (and by actual I mean to the eye, in open field)


    ps: if I well junge by the pictures the tint on this TN12 2014 cw is quite good and slightly warmer the PD35. do you have any feedback on the neutral white TN12 2014?
    Last edited by Fra881; 03-07-2014 at 06:46 PM.

  15. #15
    Flashaholic* oKtosiTe's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by Fra881 View Post
    ps: if I well junge by the pictures the tint on this TN12 2014 cw is quite good and slightly warmer the PD35. do you have any feedback on the neutral white TN12 2014?
    I assume the tint lottery has a big role to play here, but let's see what selfbuilt has to say...

  16. #16
    *Flashaholic* selfbuilt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by Fra881 View Post
    however I don't see much of a difference in throw, I mean 206m vs 219m is more or less the same. or is actual throw difference bigger? (and by actual I mean to the eye, in open field)
    The difference is in the pattern of the hotspot - the TN12 2014 has a much more defined hotspot, with a definite edge. The SC600-II has a gradual transition. Although the absolute peak centre throw is close, the TN12 throws much more of a "spotbeam" at a moderate distance, whereas the SC600 fades off quickly.

    ps: if I well junge by the pictures the tint on this TN12 2014 cw is quite good and slightly warmer the PD35. do you have any feedback on the neutral white TN12 2014?
    You can't really tell much about tint from the beamshots, due to the auto white balance. But you also can't draw any conclusions from a single sample of each. I didn't notice anything unusual in any of the recent CW light in this class (i.e., all within a normal variation). I have no idea what a NW version would look like (and haven't heard anything about one being made), but I would imagine it too would be typical for that range. AFAIK, all these lights are only available in CW at the moment.
    Last edited by selfbuilt; 03-08-2014 at 08:09 PM.
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  17. #17

    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by selfbuilt View Post
    The difference is in the pattern of the hotspot - the TN12 2014 has a much more defined hotspot, with a definite edge. The SC600-II has a gradual transition. Although the absolute peak centre throw is close, the TN12 throws much more of a "spotbeam" at a moderate distance, whereas the SC600 fades off quickly.


    You can't really tell much about tint from the beamshots, due to the auto white balance. But you also can't draw any conclusions from a single sample of each. I didn't notice anything unusual in any of the recent CW light in this class (i.e., all within a normal variation). I have no idea what a NW version would look like (and haven't heard anything about one being made), but I would imagine it too would be typical for that range. AFAIK, all these lights are only available in CW at the moment.
    I don't know if I can put links here, but if you search on amazon you'll find the neutral white version easily
    Last edited by Fra881; 03-08-2014 at 09:01 PM.

  18. #18
    Flashaholic BWX's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by Fra881 View Post
    I don't know if I can put links here, but if you search on amazon you'll find the neutral white version easily
    I don't think that is really a "neutral" version. I think they just put that in there by mistake.

    It is the exact same description, down to the same exact emitter..


    --------------
    --------------


    Thanks for reviews of these 1x 18650 lights!


    *edit*
    ....and... I just bought one from the Thrunite web site!
    Last edited by BWX; 03-09-2014 at 02:44 AM.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    in a german forum a mod already has bought the nw and made a quick comparison

  20. #20
    *Flashaholic* selfbuilt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by BWX View Post
    I don't think that is really a "neutral" version. I think they just put that in there by mistake.
    It is the exact same description, down to the same exact emitter..
    That is not necessarily definitive, as XM-L2 U2 Neutral Whites do exist. But if the output bin is the same, then the only difference would be in tint. But given the uncertainty, I would recommend anyone interested in a NW version confirm with the store before ordering.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fra881 View Post
    in a german forum a mod already has bought the nw and made a quick comparison
    Feel free to post a link if you have one.
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  21. #21

    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by selfbuilt View Post
    That is not necessarily definitive, as XM-L2 U2 Neutral Whites do exist. But if the output bin is the same, then the only difference would be in tint.
    do you mean they have exactly the same lumens? (they both are given as 1050 lumens but I thought it was an error, and the nw would have been that 7-10% dimmer)

    here it is indoor beamshot comparison at page 8 http://www.taschenlampen-forum.de/th...erbrenner.html

  22. #22
    *Flashaholic* selfbuilt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by Fra881 View Post
    do you mean they have exactly the same lumens? (they both are given as 1050 lumens but I thought it was an error, and the nw would have been that 7-10% dimmer)
    Thanks for the link.

    Typically, Neutral White emitters are one (or two) output bins lower than concurrently shipping Cool White versions. This is due to the extra phosphor required to "warm" up the color temperature (i.e., net effect is to reduce luminus flux, given common manufacturing processes). So that would mean anywhere from ~1-13% lower output (~7% lower on average) for any one bit-step down, depending on where exactly the two samples are within their respective bins.

    But you can find Neutral White U2-bins. Although uncommon, there would be no expected meaningful difference in output to a Cool White U2-bin emitter. Of course, they could vary up to ~7% (i.e., depending on where each one is within than common bin). And there are a lot of other variables between actual light samples (i.e. circuit, reflector, etc.) that can modulate that further. But the point is that the output bin is what matters in terms of output - regardless of the tint.

    In this case, I see there is at least one other vendor that is reporting NW T6 output bins for the TN12-2014. That would be more in line with expectations (i.e., one output bin down).

    You can't discriminate one output bin difference in real life (especially when tint changes), so the only real decision question should be which tint you prefer.

    P.S.: As an aside, try not to ascribe too much meaning to tint comparison beamshots. It's not really possible to find a single common camera white balance that will match your relative perceptions.
    Last edited by selfbuilt; 03-09-2014 at 01:43 PM.
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  23. #23

    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by selfbuilt View Post
    Thanks for the link.

    Typically, Neutral White emitters are one (or two) output bins lower than concurrently shipping Cool White versions. This is due to the extra phosphor required to "warm" up the color temperature (i.e., net effect is to reduce luminus flux, given common manufacturing processes). So that would mean anywhere from ~1-13% lower output (~7% lower on average) for any one bit-step down, depending on where exactly the two samples are within their respective bins.

    But you can find Neutral White U2-bins. Although uncommon, there would be no expected meaningful difference in output to a Cool White U2-bin emitter. Of course, they could vary up to ~7% (i.e., depending on where each one is within than common bin). And there are a lot of other variables between actual light samples (i.e. circuit, reflector, etc.) that can modulate that further. But the point is that the output bin is what matters in terms of output - regardless of the tint.

    In this case, I see there is at least one other vendor that is reporting NW T6 output bins for the TN12-2014. That would be more in line with expectations (i.e., one output bin down).

    You can't discriminate one output bin difference in real life (especially when tint changes), so the only real decision question should be which tint you prefer.

    P.S.: As an aside, try not to ascribe too much meaning to tint comparison beamshots. It's not really possible to find a single common camera white balance that will match your relative perceptions.
    crystal clear as always thanks, I'll try the nw!

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Have invested some time in looking at different vendors of TN12 (2014) as I seek a neutral tint.

    Seems to me that the marketing folks have appropriated the term "neutral." I observe that all CWs that are accurately described are XM-L2 U2. The few offerors of NW describe their emitters as XM-L T6.

    So emailed IS about their current offering of the XM-L2 U2. They confirmed it to be the CW version, and are hoping to receive in an order of NWs.

    Nothing definitive here, just my findings from the (inaccurate) marketplace.
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  25. #25
    Flashaholic BWX's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Another clue is that they are not even selling a NW version on their own website. It is only listed as the CW version.
    http://www.thrunite-store.com/thrunite-tn12-2014/

    If I could have gotten a NW with same output, I probably would have, but I like the very high output on this one 18650 CW light. Maybe I'll get a another NW version down the road.

  26. #26

    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Hey guys! I recently bought this light and had a question. When I first got the light I put in a fresh 18650 battery and when I turned the light on it jumped to strobe on its own. So I turned it off and took the battery out, then put it back in and it did it again. It stopped doing it for a while but then started again. Have you guys heard of this before? Any recomendations? Thanks in advance for the help.

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    *Flashaholic* selfbuilt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by Billybatson View Post
    Hey guys! I recently bought this light and had a question. When I first got the light I put in a fresh 18650 battery and when I turned the light on it jumped to strobe on its own. So I turned it off and took the battery out, then put it back in and it did it again. It stopped doing it for a while but then started again.
    Aside from doing a thorough contact surface clean, there isn't much that I can think of it. Have you tried another cell? Otherwise, it could be a problem with the light's circuit.
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  28. #28

    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    On Thrunite's website, only one version of the TN12 is shown. On Amazon.com, the Thrunite Store is selling regular and "neutral white" versions of the TN12. I recently ordered a neutral white TN12 because, on the day I placed my order, it was the only version available on Amazon. This TN12 arrived and nowhere on the box, instruction sheet or flashlight does it mention anything about being "neutral white." Compared with my two Nitecore P12s, however, the beam from this TN12 is definitely warmer or "neutral."

    Parts of the TN12's body feel more slim than the P12 and I don't find the TN12's side switch to be "squishy" at all. The TN12's switch is slightly smaller than the P12's, but easier to feel by touch than the P12's.
    Last edited by AbnInfantry; 03-15-2014 at 08:37 AM.
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  29. #29
    Flashaholic* martinaee's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    He noted that some long 18650's are tight. Can someone recommend "shorter" 18650's? Also this light has momentary, right? I didn't see that mentioned, but probably just missed it.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Thrunite TN12 2014 (XM-L2, 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIME, VI

    Quote Originally Posted by martinaee View Post
    He noted that some long 18650's are tight. Can someone recommend "shorter" 18650's? Also this light has momentary, right? I didn't see that mentioned, but probably just missed it.
    EagleTac 3100s and 3400s are usually pretty safe bets.

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