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Thread: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAMS+

  1. #1

    Rolleye11 Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAMS+

    Warning: pic heavy, as usual.




    The RS11 has recently been revised from the original model released in 2012. New for 2014 is higher output (with a XM-L2 emitter) and a revised charging system (with inclusion of a custom 18650 battery).

    Let's see how it compares to the original RS11-2012, and to other recent lights in this class.

    Manufacturer Specifications:
    Note: as always, these are only what the manufacturer/dealers report. To see my actual testing results, scroll down the review.

    • CREE XM-L2 U2 LED
    • Four lighting modes: High/Medium/Low/Strobe
    • ANSI lumens/runtime: Hi: 930 lm / 2.5 hr – Med: 230 lm / 6 hr – Lo: 6 lm / 260 hr – Stobe: 930 lm / 6 hr
    • Peak beam intensity: 16146
    • Max beam distance: 254m
    • Working Voltage: 3.0V - 8.4V
    • Battery compatibility: 2x CR123A / 1x 18650 (any 18650 battery with PCB protection). Warning: Only use the supplied KLARUS custom 18650 battery when charging the light directly (using the magnetic charging cable). All other batteries must be taken out to recharge
    • Brand new ergonomic design allows easy operation with just one hand
      Brand new switch design with an enlarged and recessed main switch making it easy to find and hard to activate accidentally
    • Brand New custom KLARUS 2600mAh 3.7V rechargeable Li-ion battery, using Samsung cells and a unique contact design that automatically aligns positive/negative current regardless of battery orientation
    • Tripod mountable via the standard UNC1/4′ -20 threaded mounting point
    • Specially designed magnetic charging port. When the charging cable is within 1cm of the charging port it self-locates to make the connection.
    • The charging cable can be removed quickly and safely at any time, which makes it an effective flashlight to use in rapid response situations
    • Uses a USB interface chargeable design, so you can charge in the home, office, airport, vehicle, etc. Basically, anywhere that has a USB interface
      Low loss, high intensity, portable USB charging cable
    • Strobe can be activated when the flashlight is on or off, giving instant access to a blinding strobe from any mode
    • Three lighting modes with memory function make it adaptable for different situations
    • Detachable stainless steel strike bezel protects the lens and has a self-defense purpose
    • Color filters and a diffuser can be securely attached; screwed-in to replace the bezel
    • Impact resistance: 1.5m
    • Waterproof to IPX-8 Standard (underwater to 2 meters)
    • Charging: Input: 5 V; Output 4.2V/500 mA Max
    • Charging time: 7 hours
    • Body color: Military grey
    • Reflector: Textured orange peel reflector
    • Lens: Toughened ultra-clear glass
    • Dimensions: 160mm (Length) x 35mm (Head) x 25.4mm (Body)
    • Net weight: 160g (Excluding battery)
    • Included accessories: 18650 battery, holster, lanyard, body clip, USB charging cable and two spare o-rings
    • MSRP: ~$99



    The RS11 uses similar display packaging as before, but updated with new info and specs. The light comes with a good number of extras – most notable is the custom magnetic USB charging cable and custom 2600mAh protected 18650. Also included are the standard manual, spare o-rings, basic wrist strap, removable pocket clip (attached), and belt holster (with closing flap). Note there is no grip ring included.




    From left to right: AW 18650 protected; Klarus XT11-2014, XT11-2012, RS11-2014, RS11-2012; Nitecore P25; Eagletac G25C2-II.

    All dimensions directly measured, and given with no batteries installed (unless indicated):

    Klarus RS11-2014: Weight 151.5g, Length: 159mm, Width (bezel): 34.9mm
    Klarus RS11-2012: Weight 158.0g, Length: 160mm, Width (bezel) 34.9mm
    Klarus XT11-2014: Weight 140.1g, Length: 150.5mm, Width (bezel): 34.8mm
    Fenix PD35: Weight: 82.7g, Length: 138.1mm, Width (bezel): 25.4mm
    Eagletac G25C2-II (stock): Weight 141.0g, Length: 150.6mm, Width: 39.6mm
    Eagletac TX25C2: Weight 93.6g, Length: 120.4mm, Width (bezel): 31.6mm
    Foursevens MMX: Weight 145.8g, Length: 153.3mm, Width (bezel): 38.7mm
    Nitecore P12: Weight: 89.7g, Length: 139.4mm, Width (bezel): 25.4mm
    Olight M20S-X: Weight: 124.1g, Length: 145.4mm, Width: 35.5mm (head)
    Sunwayman F20C: Weight: 111.5g, Length: 133.6mm, Width (bezel): 31.0mm
    Sunwayman V25C: Weight: 117.3g, Length: 134.9mm, Width (bezel): 32.1mm
    Thrunite TN12-2014: Weight: 80.0g, Length: 140.5mm, Width (bezel): 25.4mm
    Zebralight SC600: Weight 87.2g, Length: 107.8mm, Width (bezel) 29.7mm







    Generally, the RS11-2014 looks similar to the old RS11-2012. The main external difference is the appearance of the switch buttons. Otherwise, the anodizing remains a rich dark grey-brown color (hard anodized). As before, no blemishes or flaws on my sample – I find this color very attractive. Labels are clear against the dark background. As before, knurling is not very aggressive. But with all the ridge detail and extra elements around the head and body, overall grip remains good.

    As before, the clip-on pocket clip is fairly basic, but seems to hold on fairly well (for this type of clip). And again, the clip is head-facing, and not reversible. There is no grip ring bundled with light (in keeping with the electronic switches in the head). There is now a tripod screw attachment in the head.

    As before, the light is controlled by two electronic switches in the head. The upper black on/off switch is on a raised part of the head. The lower bright orange button is the strobe switch. The interface is unchanged from before (scroll down for the UI section details). Switch feel is about typical for electronic switches, but the timings may take a little getting used to (again, scroll down to the UI section).

    The RS11 can tailstand, thanks to the raised side areas (which are also the lanyard attachment points).

    Screw threads in the head remain traditional triangular-cut, and silky smooth in action – I wish more lights glided so easily when tightening and loosening. Threads are also anodized now for lock out, thanks to the re-designed charging system.

    There is a small spring in the head, so all flat-top high capacity cells should fit and work fine in the light. It also accommodates the custom 18650 supplied, shown below.







    The plastic insert you see in the second and third pics is just to lock the battery out during transport (i.e., it is shipped inside the light). You can discard it, as well as the external clear plastic wrapper.

    The cell has custom positive (center) and negative (outer) contacts on both ends. This is for charging the custom cell inside the light, using the supplied charger.

    Let's look at the charging setup:






    The tail uses a similar magnetic charging dock to before (with the exact same charging cable). The 18650 charging cable directly attaches to the external tailcap contacts through a strong magnetic connection (you can see two metal circular contacts). As before, I was not able to read a battery voltage at the external tailcap contacts with an 18650 installed inside the light. This means you don't have to worry about accidentally shorting out a battery inside the light.

    Inside the tailcap, these contacts are connected to the positive and negative terminals of the custom battery through two springs. This replaces the previous inner metal sleeve that was connected to the head (for the second current path). This is why anodizing was not possible on the original RS11. The flip side to the custom charging arrangement used here is that you need to use the bundled custom cell to charge inside the light. Regular 18650 cells will work fine in the light, but you won't be able to charge them.




    The charging indicator LED has also been updated from before, and is now a ring around the charging dock (instead of a separate indicator). A nice touch.

    The charging cable is unchanged from the initial version. As before, there is a raised plastic divider separating the inner and outer magnetic contacts on the charging cable. The divider is important, as you could otherwise potentially short your USB connector if the magnet attracted metal to both contacts simultaneously. To be on the safe side, I always recommend that you connect the magnetic head to the flashlight before you connect the USB end to your computer or an AC power adapter.

    Please scroll down to my new Charging Current section for detailed measures of charging performance.




    The RS11-2014 seems to use the same reflector as before, only with a light orange peel texturing on my sample.

    There is also a removable stainless steel bezel ring as before. The head diameter and threading is unchanged from before, so the colored filters or diffuser available as accessories for the original RS11/XT11 will work here as well.

    User Interface

    The user interface is unchanged from the original RS11 (which remains fairly unique in my testing).

    As before, press the upper black switch (with the Klarus logo) for on-off. You can temporarily press for momentary, press longer for locked-on. The timing here takes some getting used to – you need to hold it for >2 secs for it to stay locked-on. This means you could easily signal in Morse code with the momentary feature, but it may be a bit frustrating initially for constant-on.

    You turn the light off by a quick press-release of the on/off switch. You change modes by pressing and holding the on/off switch for ~1 sec. This will cause the light to jump to the next output mode (and hold at that level). To change output mode again, you have to release the switch and sustain-press once more (i.e., simply holding the switch down will not advance you more than one mode). Mode sequence is Hi > Med > Lo, in a repeating loop on successive presses. Note that a quick click of the switch will turn the light off (something I found myself doing on occasion when trying to change modes).

    To activate strobe, press and hold the lower orange switch at any time (including from off). As before, a temporary press will give you momentary mode, a >2 sec press is required for constant-on strobe.

    As before, the RS11 does have a memory mode for constant output levels - but, you have to leave the light on for at least ~3 secs in any given mode before turning off. If you turn off faster than that, the light returns to its previously saved level.

    Video:

    For more information on the overall build and user interface, please see my video overview:



    As with all my videos, I recommend you have annotations turned on. I commonly update the commentary with additional information or clarifications before publicly releasing the video.

    PWM/Strobe

    Reviewer's note: I have recently updated my oscilloscope software, so the traces below may look a little different from my earlier reviews.

    The original RS11 used PWM on all modes (including Hi) at ~1.16-1.17 kHz. Let's see how the new RS11-2014 fares …





    Pretty much the same, although I measured the frequency as ~1.19-1.20 kHz.

    PWM is an apparently unavoidable by-product of having the dual control circuit. Typical, ~1kHz PWM is visually detectable at the lower modes (for those of us who are sensitive to it), but I at least I do not find the PWM frequency to be annoying or obtrusive on any level in this light.

    Note as well that it is practically impossible to notice the PWM on the Hi mode, even when shining on a fan. I have come to realize in my testing that PWM is far more noticeable when the duty cycle is low (i.e., the light is off more than it is on for each pulse). For higher perceived output (where the light is on for most of the time), the visual perception of PWM drops considerably. This is an example where you would need an oscilloscope to be able to detect the Hi mode PWM.



    As before, strobe is an oscillating strobe that switches between two frequencies every ~1.6 secs or so. Here is a blow up of each frequency:




    As you can see, the strobe switches between 7.2 Hz and 18.1 Hz.

    Charging Current

    A new feature I am adding to my reviews is direct measures of the charging current for USB-based in-light charging systems. For these measures, I am using the new Xtar VI01 "USB Detector", which has recently been reviewed by HKJ here. Basically a specialized USB multimeter (current/voltage meter), I have picked up this model thanks to the confirmation from HKJ that his sample was accurate within the typical USB spec range. Note these units report input voltage (not output voltage), so they typically show the standard USB spec of ~5V DC

    For charging tests, I started with a discharged Xtar RS11-2014 2600mAh battery, reading ~2.60V resting voltage. For all these tests, I remove the USB detector after each reading was taken, to ensure accurate charging times,

    Initial charging current and input voltage:




    As you can see, charging started at 530mA with a typical USB 5.0V input voltage ("U" is meant to represent Volts on the second display above). This is the max charge current that I would expect from USB (i.e., the USB 2.0 standard of 0.5A).

    After 3 hours of charging, I re-measured charging current and input voltage:




    As you can see, the charging current has started to drop down by this point, to 460mA. Input voltage is largely unchanged, as expected.

    After 6 hours of charging:




    Charging current has now dropped to 150mA, still with ~5V DC input voltage. As you might expect, it won't be long until charging terminates.

    In my testing, the charging indicator went green ~45 mins later, for a total charging time of 6hr 45mins. Resting voltage of the Xtar 2600mAh battery was 4.20V.

    This is quite reasonable charging time and final termination voltage.

    Standby Drain

    Since both switches are electronic, there needs to be a standby current when the head is fully connected. I measured this current at 213uA. For the supplied 2600mAh battery, that would translate into about 17 months before a charged cell would be fully drained.

    This is quite reasonable for the class. If you are concerned about this current (or the risk of accidental activation), I recommend you lock out the light when not in use by a quick twist of the head.

    Beamshots:

    And now the white-wall beamshots. All lights are on 1x18650 AW protected (2200mAh), or the supplied 18650 battery. Lights are about ~0.75 meter from a white wall (with the camera ~1.25 meters back from the wall). Automatic white balance on the camera, to minimize tint differences.









    As before, the RS11 and XT11 2014 versions continue to have very similar beams – the difference above is simply one of max output on a single 18650. The pattern looks much the same as the earlier 2012 models – again, just differing in terms of max output on this battery source.

    Scroll down for direct output and throw measures.

    Testing Method:

    All my output numbers are relative for my home-made light box setup, as described on my flashlightreviews.ca website. You can directly compare all my relative output values from different reviews - i.e. an output value of "10" in one graph is the same as "10" in another. All runtimes are done under a cooling fan, except for any extended run Lo/Min modes (i.e. >12 hours) which are done without cooling.

    I have devised a method for converting my lightbox relative output values (ROV) to estimated Lumens. See my How to convert Selfbuilt's Lightbox values to Lumens thread for more info.

    Throw/Output Summary Chart:

    My summary tables are reported in a manner consistent with the ANSI FL-1 standard for flashlight testing. Please see http://www.flashlightreviews.ca/FL1.htm for a discussion, and a description of all the terms used in these tables. Effective July 2012, I have updated all my Peak Intensity/Beam Distance measures with a NIST-certified Extech EA31 lightmeter (orange highlights).







    Ok, there's a lot of data up. The simplest way to describe it is that the new 2014 versions of the RTS11 and XT11 have higher output on Hi than their predecessors. But this can be a bit variable by battery type.

    To help you compare, here is a comparison of all output levels on each supported battery type, for the new 2014 versions of these lights:



    The RS11-2014 has a fairly consistent set of outputs across the various battery types (at least on Med and Hi). It is slightly brighter on 2x battery sources, though. The XT11-2014 has a more pronounced set of output changes depending on the voltage source – with again greater max output on the higher-voltage 2x battery sources.

    FYI, this general pattern is similar the original the RS11 and XT11 lights (i.e., the XT11 was always more variable on different voltage sources). But the absolute output levels have changed on both models now, as you can tell from the summary tables above.

    These results help explain the reported beam distance measures for the two lights (i.e., you might reasonably wonder why two lights with the same emitter/reflector have significant differences in throw). It all comes down to the different drive levels on different battery configurations.

    According to Klarus, all their ANSI FL-1 measures were done on the standard 2600mAh cell in the RS11-2014 (and a 2200mAh cell in the XT11-2014). That certainly fits well with my measured beam intensity/distance measures for these two lights on 18650. However, in absolute terms, I find my 2xCR123A lumen estimates better correlate with the official lumen output specs.

    In any case, the output and beam measures reported here are directly measured in my hands, so you can rely on the relative consistency across lights, batteries, and levels.

    Output/Runtime Graphs:

    Let's start with a comparison of the new 2104 versions of the RS11 and XT11:








    As you could tell from the earlier tables, the RS11 is more consistent than the XT11 in its output levels across batteries. As a result, the graphs above should give you useful direct comparison information on relative output and runtimes of the two models.

    Let's see how the RS11-2014 compares to others in this class, including the original 2012 version.








    In general terms, the RS11-2014 performs as you would expect – but with much greater output now on the Med and Hi levels, compared to the original 2012 version. This typically puts the RS11-2014 among the higher max output 18650 lights I've tested.

    Potential Issues

    Due to the electronic switches, there will be a stand-by current when fully connected. The ~210uA current on the RS11-2014 was quite reasonable for this class (i.e., up to 17 months for the supplied battery). Even better, you can now easily physically lock out the light by a quick turn of the head (which was not available on the original RS11).

    As before, the RS11-2014 uses PWM on all modes. However, there is no visual evidence of flickering on the RS11 high mode, and the Lo/Med modes remain at a very reasonable ~1.2 kHz.

    Switch button feel is still relatively limited (i.e., may be hard to find by touch alone). As before, the user interface and switch timings are somewhat unique, and take some getting used to. For example, you have to hold down the switches longer than typical for constant-on, and press-hold repeatedly to change modes. There is also a delay before the current mode will be memorized.

    Due to physical re-design, you need to use the bundled custom battery for the in-light charging system. The 2600mAh cell is quite reasonable in this regard, and as a bonus you can now lock out the light (which I consider to be a more than reasonable tradeoff for the custom design). Any standard 18650 battery can be run in the light, though.

    The magnetic charging cable worked well, with reasonable currents and charging times. There is no open voltage reading at the tailcap (i.e., no apparent risk of shorting your battery inside the light). I recommend you connect the magnetic end of the cable to the light first, given the (slight) potential risk of shorting your USB or AC/USB port otherwise (due to the strength of the magnetic connector). The raised plastic divider on the magnetic cable head should reduce this risk, but I wouldn't want to have to rely on that.

    Preliminary Observations

    First, the top-line info - the RS11 update for 2014 definitely increases the Med and Hi output levels from the 2012 version, on all batteries.

    The charging cable (with its innovative magnetic dock) is unchanged – although the internal in-light charging system has been re-designed. In my view, this has improved the general usability of the light (e.g., can now easily lock it out). But it also means that you have to use the custom 2600mAh battery for in-light charging now. Of course, the RS11-2014 takes all types of standard cells – it is only in-charging that requires the custom 18650 cell. Charging time and currents were appropriate for this class of in-light charging lights.

    Physically, the RS11 still has a robust hand feel. Build quality is very high. Ergonomics of the light are similar to before. I still find the switches somewhat difficult to access by touch alone. But overall layout is consistent with what you would expect.

    As I noted in my original RS11 review, the user interface (which is unchanged for 2014) is somewhat unique – and frankly not very intuitive, in my view. In particular, the press-and-hold for activation – and repeated press-holds for mode-switching - is awkward. The same goes for the several second delay to memorize the last level used (and the Hi to Lo sequence). I supposed some may like this interface, but I still prefer a light that you can pass to anyone with only minimal instruction on how to use.

    Circuit performance is generally similar to the previous RS11 model – but with higher drive levels at all outputs. Even with the higher output bin emitters, this means that you can expect shorter relative runtimes at each level, of course. Note that comparing the RS11 to the XT11 on the basis of specs is a bit complicated, due to the greater variation of the XT11 across battery types. I recommend everyone refer to the comparison tables and runtimes in this review for more info.

    It's nice to see some of the updates on the RS11 build. I can only assume that this light has done well enough for Klarus to support this investment in updated emitters, circuits and charging system. That said, I still think a revised (and more intuitive) user interface would be preferable for the general user (i.e., the function is still geared to a more "tactical" crowd on the RS11). As always, I welcome the input of members here.

    ----

    Klarus RS11-2014 provided by Klarus for review.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

  2. #2
    Flashaholic* Ryp's Avatar
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    Default Re: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAM

    Thanks for the review!

  3. #3
    *Flashaholic* kj2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAM

    Nice light
    Thanks.

  4. #4
    ven's Avatar
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    Default Re: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAM

    Thank you for your excellent as always informative review

  5. #5

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    Default Re: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAM

    Excellent work, as always.

    I am surprised they didn't update the UI also. I owned an RS11 briefly, and of the 30 or so lights I have purchased, it had by far the worst interface. I despise twisty lights, but I do have a couple of them that I do use. The RS11 was a catch-and-release, because the interface was just so bad. You have no idea how clumsy the interface is until you try it - I had actually read about it in your original RS11 review, but it didn't convey how annoying it was. Just seems to take forever to change modes, and because of the long delay in memorization, I found myself turning it on in the wrong mode on a regular basis.

    I do really like the build quality - it does feel very solid (much more so than almost all other mid-range lights), and it is a good looking light. If they had updated the interface, I would have bought it without hesitation. I'm still looking for a Klarus I can love, but this will not definitely not be it.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAM

    Quote Originally Posted by thedoc007 View Post
    I am surprised they didn't update the UI also. I owned an RS11 briefly, and of the 30 or so lights I have purchased, it had by far the worst interface. I despise twisty lights, but I do have a couple of them that I do use. The RS11 was a catch-and-release, because the interface was just so bad. You have no idea how clumsy the interface is until you try it - I had actually read about it in your original RS11 review, but it didn't convey how annoying it was. Just seems to take forever to change modes, and because of the long delay in memorization, I found myself turning it on in the wrong mode on a regular basis.
    Yes, it does seem odd to me that they didn't take this opportunity to revise the timings. At least you can lock out the light now (a major issue I had with the first version, since it could easily activate in a bag, etc.).

    The challenge with electronic switches is that it is hard to design an interface that appeals to everyone. In this case, it still seems overly influenced by a "tactical" perspective. But honestly, how often is someone going to want to use morse code with their electronic-switch light (compared to how often a regular user just wants to have it come on or turn off)?
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
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  7. #7

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    Default Re: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAM

    Quote Originally Posted by selfbuilt View Post
    The challenge with electronic switches is that it is hard to design an interface that appeals to everyone. In this case, it still seems overly influenced by a "tactical" perspective. But honestly, how often is someone going to want to use morse code with their electronic-switch light (compared to how often a regular user just wants to have it come on or turn off)?
    Especially since the XT11 already offers the dedicated tactical interface in basically the same form factor...

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAM

    Good thing I have waited for your review selfbuilt .
    I have the old xt11 and finality considered buying the new version but the rs11 is just a better light to me in output , lux and the stepdown output is higher .


    The few thing I don't like about the rs11 is that the head is not machine sealed and the charging dock can be unscrewed which just gives the light two more potential ways water can get in if o-ring's fail or if threads are fully tightened . I know they would be sealed well but it still can happen .

  9. #9

    Default Re: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAM

    Quote Originally Posted by GehenSienachlinks View Post
    The few thing I don't like about the rs11 is that the head is not machine sealed and the charging dock can be unscrewed which just gives the light two more potential ways water can get in if o-ring's fail or if threads are fully tightened . I know they would be sealed well but it still can happen .
    That's an interesting point. But it is pretty rare to have a sealed head - most makers typically allow you to unscrew bezels to access the lens/reflector/emitter front. The XT11 is the same as the RS11 in this regard - both can be easily opened at the bezel by hand. Cheaper lights that use a press-fit bezel can't be opened, but they may actually be more likely to suffer water issues (i.e., if they weren't press-fit properly at the factory). The exception are higher-end lights where the bezels are carefully fit and the electronics potted. But as a reasonable cost/performance trade-off, I suspect most like a screw-on bezel.

    It's true to the tailcap can be unscrewed on the RS11, but you would need a specialized tool for this. And I would point out even the XT11 could be compromised, if the rubber boot cover was ripped or torn. But as a matter of general waterproofness, it is good to check that you have good seals on the threaded areas of any light, since these are obvious areas of potential water entry.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAM


  11. #11

    Default Re: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAM

    Ah, that is not so uncommon either - many lights are assembled that way, and then the head is temporarily "sealed" with a bit of loctite. You can see some remnants of it in that picture. Presumably they didn't put enough on that sample.

    I just tried my RS11, and the head wouldn't give. I would likely need to get out the strap wrenches to open mine.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAM

    Can the rs11 function just the same if the xt11 tail switch is used on it or would it be dangerous especially with the klarus cell ?
    Last edited by GehenSienachlinks; 06-13-2014 at 11:25 AM.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Klarus RS11 2014 (XM-L2 - 1x18650, 2xCR123A/RCR) Review + Charger: RUNTIMES, BEAM

    Quote Originally Posted by GehenSienachlinks View Post
    Can the rs11 function just the same if the xt11 tail switch is used on it or would it be dangerous especially with the klarus cell ?
    It doesn't fit - there is no tail opening for the RS11. But it wouldn't work right even if it did, due to different control circuits in the head. The two series are not interchangeable.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

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