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Thread: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

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    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Author's Statement for Transparency and Disclosure
    The test sample/s featured in this article were provided for technical testing and review by "Fenixlight Limited". Test samples are retained by the reviewer following publication of the completed review for the purposes of long term testing and product comparisons.
    Supply and Delivery was fulfilled by "MyFenix.co.uk", the UK Distributor for Fenix lights
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Fenix are not gun light specialists, but always had one unsung hero that works particularly well when mounted on a rifle, the TK15. With the release of the TK32, Fenix have stepped this up by a significant margin, and have created a design with unique double switch tail-cap but no secondary circuit. Not only does the TK32 have a super strong white beam, it also has red, green and blue LEDs for specialist low light use.





    Author's note: due to the general tendency for reviews to become ever longer, this review is presented as a 'Compact Review' with many images being animated to attempt to reduce excessive scrolling. You may need to wait for the images to load fully.


    Taking a more detailed look:

    The photos here show; the packaging, contents, tail-cap switches, tail-cap removed next to battery tube, details of the additional tail-cap contacts and of the unique double battery tube with special tube liner, the positive contact, tail threads, deep reflector and LEDs.



    Moving onto the TK32's holster:




    Fenix have tried to add a spare cell holder (which is a very welcome design feature), but unfortunately this have not been thought through. 2x CR123s won't stay put, as putting in the second makes the first fall out. With 18650, as you can see here, the cell wrap is exposed to the tail-cap, and this means you will very quickly destroy the cell's wrap and make the cell unusable when taking the TK32 in and out of the holster a few times. Beware.

    If this second loop of elasticated fabric had been positioned higher up the side, it would probably have worked perfectly.



    The TK32 is larger than the average single 18650 light thanks to its large head. Of course the larger head gives room for the large reflector and excellent throw. Here it is shown with a Fenix 18650 cell and the Fenix UC45 (the head of which if the same diameter as the TK22).




    The beam

    First of all, the TK32 is not limited to white light. It has three auxiliary LEDs set into the reflector giving red, green and blue beams as well. Here the white output is set to its lowest value and the TK32 cycled through the coloured options.




    The indoor beam shots are shown with the white beam at a normal exposure, but the coloured outputs shown at a much longer exposure to show the beam characteristics clearly. (NOTE: The colour output is NOT as bright as this shows).

    Due to the inset coloured LEDs, the TK32's white beam does show artefacts, though these do not show very clearly in this photo. In normal use, these minor artefacts are not noticeable, and you will only really see them when white wall hunting and rotating the beam. The coloured LEDs have beams filled with artefacts, but for 5mm type LEDs this is normal.




    Moving outdoors, and it seemed that even more then usual, a comparison to the TK41 was in order. So first up here is the TK41 as a reference.



    Then onto the TK32. The spill is slightly wider and the total output higher. The TK41 still has a slightly more intense hotspot, but the TK32 is incredibly effective.





    Modes and User Interface:

    Being a hunting light, the TK32 has no flashing modes. There are four white output levels, plus the three low level colour outputs.

    From OFF, half press the main power switch for momentary operation of the last selected white output mode. Fully click the latch ON.

    From OFF, press the mode switch for momentary operation of the RED output mode. While holding the mode switch, Fully click the main power switch to latch the RED output ON (like this the mode button now does not change modes).

    When ON, a single click of the mode switch cycles through Low, Medium, High and Turbo.

    When ON, Press and hold the mode switch for 1s to change to colour output. Press the mode switch to cycle through red, green and blue. To return to white output either press and hold the modes switch for 1s again, or switch the main power OFF.

    Instant access to red or white output is very useful, but I would have preferred there to be a way to access the green and blue modes too without having to go through white first.



    Batteries and output:

    The TK32 will run on 18650, CR123, and even RCR123 (although Fenix advise caution when using RCR123), making this more versatile than most single 18650 lights.

    Keeping this test as much 'Fenix' as possible, the TK32 was powered using the Fenix ARB-L2S 3400mAh 18650 cell charged with the Fenix ARE-C2 charger.



    To measure actual output, I built an integrating sphere. See here for more detail. The sensor registers visible light only (so Infra-Red and Ultra-Violet will not be measured).

    Please note, all quoted lumen figures are from a DIY integrating sphere, and according to ANSI standards. Although every effort is made to give as accurate a result as possible, they should be taken as an estimate only. The results can be used to compare outputs in this review and others I have published.

    Fenix TK32 using ARB-L2S 3400mAh 18650 I.S. measured ANSI output Lumens PWM frequency or Strobe frequency (Hz)
    Turbo 952 0
    High 416 0
    Medium 137 0
    Low 12 0
    Red 5 0
    Green 3 0
    Blue 7 0

    Measured beam range comes in at 407m.

    As there is an electronic switch in a dual switch tailcap, you would expect there to be a secondary tail-cap circuit which would introduce parasitic drain. However with the TK32 this is NOT the case. Fenix have used a unique double battery tube (or a battery tube with liner) to allow direct switching from each of the two tail-cap switches without any additional circuitry.

    Measuring the operation of the switches, it is clear each of the switches operates as a simple make/break switch, with the main power switch connecting the negative terminal to the three gold contact pads that touch the battery tube liner, and the mode switch connecting the negative terminal to the exposed threads of the outer battery tube.

    This direct dual tail-cap switching is an excellent innovation from Fenix, however one unknown is how robust this double battery tube will prove to be.

    A consequence of this is that the existing Fenix remote pressure switch will not work with the TK32, but Fenix have said a TK32 pressure switch is being worked on at the moment.


    This following runtime traces show the TK32 with output reset to Turbo after the automatic downshift each 15 minutes. The drop in output at the 1H 52M mark is the low battery warning flash being captured by the output log (with the output log only recording an instantaneous value every 2s it tends to miss low battery warning flashes).





    The TK32 out in the field

    Focussing on the TK32 as a hunting lamp (though it has proved to be a fantastic hand held 'spotter' lamp), I've fitted it to the Ruger 10/22 for a few field trips. The Fenix gun mount is being used in these photos, but this is very slow to fit and remove. I prefer a QD mount that allows me to use the TK32 hand held, and then back onto the gun once the targets have been identified.



    The coloured output is not bright enough to use with a rifle scope, and is better suited to hand held use.






    To better show the TK32's range, this location is actually the driving range of the golf course. The range has distance markers out to 250 yards.

    You can see the letters of the 250 yard marker lit up in the distance.




    Using a 8-32x scope to illustrate the light as seen through a rifle scope, there are three different views here. The scope set to 8x magnification and the exposure set to give the normal view as seen by the eye. At 8x the view is nice and bright with non-dark adapted vision. Zooming to the maximum 32x magnification, the visible brightness drop significantly (as would be expected), but is still usable. This is initially shown at the 'normal' brightness as if seen with non-dark-adapted eyes, but then shown with an increased exposure to represent the image once your eyes have become partially dark adapted. 32x is not really a practical magnification to use at night, so this is shown just out of interest to see how bright the view would be, and it is still perfectly usable.




    So what about some quarry? Well this is a rabbit out at about 150 yards and turns to see where all this light is coming from. Too far for a certain clean kill with a .22LR, but target identification is absolutely clear.




    The TK32 proved to be excellent in illuminating the scope view to distances much further than I would ever take a shot with a .22LR, but it also excelled as a hand held light used for spotting targets in the distance. I found the maximum output to also been too intense once my eyes had started to adapt, and I was more often using it on Medium or High for the spotting tasks. The momentary operation also allowed for quick 'looks' at the target without giving it time to fix my location.

    The coloured output was useful for checking equipment over, but lacked the power to be used with the rifle scope.

    Fenix have taken the well-known beam strength of the TK41, but reducing it down to a single 18650 sized light, resulting in a really great compact search light. The TK32 is well suited to both gun mounting for use with a rifle scope, or hand held use for scanning large areas quickly. The remote pressure switch will make this even better when gun mounted, but hand-held the TK32 is excellent for searching large areas.





    Last edited by subwoofer; 08-28-2014 at 07:24 AM.
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    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    reserved for updates...
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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Very nice review thank you. I really like the range pictures. This seems like a good compact thrower, and no PWM.

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    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Quote Originally Posted by Taz80 View Post
    Very nice review thank you. I really like the range pictures. This seems like a good compact thrower, and no PWM.
    Thanks to Fenix eliminating the secondary circuit normally present in a dual switch tail-cap, there is indeed no PWM.
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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Interesting switch for Fenix. Looks like they have adapted the early NovaTac system (which used an inner spring in the barrel rather than solid tube), which migrated to the current signal wire in the current HDS lights. As such I would not call it 'unique', but an interesting adaptation. I like the use of the solid tube over the spring or signal-wire used by HDS, the famous LightFlux lights used this type of mechanism for their electronic switch. The Fenix design that puts this in a light with a second non-electronic switch in the tail for power seems pretty good. Easy way to remove parasitic drain, and could allow different tail cap styles.

    If I understand correctly the main powerswitch should be a standard clicky, and the mode switch would be electronic momentary, otherwise i can't see an advantage to this design.
    Last edited by StandardBattery; 08-17-2014 at 08:41 AM.

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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Quote Originally Posted by StandardBattery View Post
    Interesting switch for Fenix. Looks like they have adapted the early NovaTac system (which used an inner spring in the barrel rather than solid tube), which migrated to the current signal wire in the current HDS lights. As such I would not call it 'unique', but an interesting adaptation. I like the use of the solid tube over the spring or signal-wire used by HDS, the famous LightFlux lights used this type of mechanism for their electronic switch. The Fenix design that puts this in a light with a second non-electronic switch in the tail for power seems pretty good. Easy way to remove parasitic drain, and could allow different tail cap styles.

    If I understand correctly the main powerswitch should be a standard clicky, and the mode switch would be electronic momentary, otherwise i can't see an advantage to this design.
    As far as I know, the Liteflux, Novatac and HDS systems do not have dual tailcap switches. Would you agree?

    The main power switch is a forward clicky standard latching switch, and the mode switch is a momentary only click switch (as normally used for electronic switching).
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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Quote Originally Posted by subwoofer View Post
    As far as I know, the Liteflux, Novatac and HDS systems do not have dual tailcap switches. Would you agree?

    The main power switch is a forward clicky standard latching switch, and the mode switch is a momentary only click switch (as normally used for electronic switching).
    That is correct, they don't use a double switch in the tail, but all use a second signal path to run the electronic switch. That why I said "The Fenix design that puts this in a light with a second non-electronic switch in the tail for power seems pretty good.". I just see this more of an adaptation on the earlier designs though as either of them could have had a second switch, the key was creating a second signal path for the electronic switch so they could remove the circuit in the bottom. If one reduces the parasitic drain as well as Zebralight then the second switch is not as important, as the mechanical switches are always a source of failures.

    I believe the double tailswitch in the TK35 does not have any parasitic drain, but I believe works differet since they have the battery carrier and can put the circuit in, but it's the use of the standard clicky switch for power that is responsible for the no parasitic drain, just as with this TK32.

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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Quote Originally Posted by StandardBattery View Post
    That is correct, they don't use a double switch in the tail, but all use a second signal path to run the electronic switch. That why I said "The Fenix design that puts this in a light with a second non-electronic switch in the tail for power seems pretty good.". I just see this more of an adaptation on the earlier designs though as either of them could have had a second switch, the key was creating a second signal path for the electronic switch so they could remove the circuit in the bottom. If one reduces the parasitic drain as well as Zebralight then the second switch is not as important, as the mechanical switches are always a source of failures.

    I believe the double tailswitch in the TK35 does not have any parasitic drain, but I believe works differet since they have the battery carrier and can put the circuit in, but it's the use of the standard clicky switch for power that is responsible for the no parasitic drain, just as with this TK32.
    Thanks to this discussion I have actually had another look at the TK35UE's battery carrier and added an update to the review:

    http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/...=1#post4441084

    I can confirm that the TK35 has no parasitic drain.

    So it does look like the TK32 is unique in being the only single 18650 powered light with a double battery tube, dual tail-cap switches and no parasitic drain.
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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    If you enjoyed the review, please remember to 'Like' me on Facebook
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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Ooooo k So hang on my second hobby is guns and I have, and don't get me wrong I am not comparing whose got the biggest but I have what my wife calls the US armory, I have a large number of hand guns that I have accumulated and obviously that number is only outmatched by cheaper than dirts ability to get ammo to me, I have a saiga 12 but have modified it substantially even with a mod on a mod on a taco 47 allowing me to fill a drum with size with size 2 and 3 from In terms of filling, not sure what the appropriate USA word is perhaps "snake shot" to military 8 ball destroyers and both commercial and military slugs in a number of forms and fashion. Before I came the USA I had a number of fully automatics Ak 47, genuine uzźi. , SA R1 through R5 the R4 was engineered and actually outperformed the galil and that's what I have done with my saiga hybridizing galil and ak and tapco technologies . Now umm from a legal stand point and will leave it at that I have been working on getting a legal status for automatic and something else but even with my military background abroad amongst others I am not sure I will ever succeed here and purchasing a legal AA 12 I am not sure will ever happen in the USA even with dual citizenship not to mention the outrageous cost of any armory in the USA. Easily seen by international comparison and the prices of say a grand fathered fully auto Thompsons sub on gunbrokers.com, many of these peeps are largely investors in a fashion. Even tho I have got my saiga through gunbrokers.com I stand by my opinion. I have used a really nice drum and even using that drum of LEGAL size and every conceivable permutation of shell in it simultaneously my results have been negligible to no jams becos of tapco and at a speed that to date I have seen or challenged and out performed it's something you would need to witness to believe. So All that talk to indicate what I hope is acceptable to you to ask you if what I see in this thread is a real functional suppressor of some sort or fashion or is it a stabilizer or cosmetic attachment or what please Message me


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    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Quote Originally Posted by Neilbenecke View Post
    So All that talk to indicate what I hope is acceptable to you to ask you if what I see in this thread is a real functional suppressor of some sort or fashion or is it a stabilizer or cosmetic attachment or what please Message me
    I wondered where that post was going!

    No problem answering in the thread. That is a SAK sound moderator fitted to my Ruger 1022. I use Eley subsonic expanding ammunition, which, combined with a polymer bolt buffer, makes the set up whisper quiet. The loudest sound by far is when the bullet hits its target.

    I don't believe in cosmetic/fashion accessories, it has to be real and functional or I wouldn't bother.

    Being based in the UK, despite some of the most restrictive gun laws, sound moderators are perfectly legal, as is 'lamping'.

    If you would like to take this a bit more off topic, feel free to PM me.

    Still laughing about your intro
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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Sub, as ever I am in awe of your reviews. This light had completely passed me by, but it looks like a goody. I'd need to see it compared to my Nitecore SR7 to know whether I want one or not. I do tend towards magnetic variable rings rather than levels, but I like the look of this.

    The twin tailcap looks similar to the Klarus XT lights.

    Your rifle is very impressive, and I envy you your skills as a hunter and the job that you have with that in mind.

    But the most impressive thing in this review is that last picture of the rifle and the markers and the night sky - absolutely magnificent shot!

    Well done, sir.
    Last edited by Nyctophiliac; 09-18-2014 at 12:54 AM.

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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Nice review.
    Last edited by markeday; 12-21-2014 at 04:52 AM.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    My computer is crap,LoL,anyway nice review Subwoofer,is there a spring under the head?

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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Quote Originally Posted by markeday View Post
    My computer is crap,LoL,anyway nice review Subwoofer,is there a spring under the head?
    Thanks

    Yes it is sprung head and tail.
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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Quote Originally Posted by subwoofer View Post
    Thanks

    Yes it is sprung head and tail.
    Thanks Subwoofer I will be adding this one to the collection.

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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Best review Ive seen on this fantastic light!! I knew the official 900 lumen rating was underrating it! I love this light and it is one of the best lights of 2014. The beam on turbo is amazing

  18. #18

    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Thank you for the thorough review!!!

    I just ordered one of these to use hopefully mounted to my scope for night time predator hunting. (still working on acquiring a suitable mount) My first high quality torch! I was hoping the output from the colored LED's would be higher... but I guess that give's me an excuse to get #2.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Fenix say the colored LEDs have 66 lumens (unclear as to total or each). Your results only add up to 15. Any idea why the huge difference?

    Have you taken a look at the Fenix TK15C, with the much brighter red 40 lumen and green 95 lumen LEDs? Too bad no blue. But maybe a blue only pocket torch for tracking? Trouble is that most "blue" LED lights don't specify exactly what nm of blue.

    And 450 lumens of white with 656 feet of throw -- I wonder if that matches the TK32 at 400 lumens, or if the heads are differently focused? I wonder with the side mode switch - will it turn on in color if that was the previous mode?

  20. #20
    Flashaholic* subwoofer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    Quote Originally Posted by lumen aeternum View Post
    Fenix say the colored LEDs have 66 lumens (unclear as to total or each). Your results only add up to 15. Any idea why the huge difference?
    Where do Fenix say that? All the information I have is that the secondary LEDs have a 100mW output. This doesn't easily translate into an OTF Lumen figure. I measure OTF lumens in an integrating sphere.

    Quote Originally Posted by lumen aeternum View Post
    Have you taken a look at the Fenix TK15C, with the much brighter red 40 lumen and green 95 lumen LEDs? Too bad no blue. But maybe a blue only pocket torch for tracking? Trouble is that most "blue" LED lights don't specify exactly what nm of blue.
    I have the TK15C on test right now. The review will be posted soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by lumen aeternum View Post
    And 450 lumens of white with 656 feet of throw -- I wonder if that matches the TK32 at 400 lumens, or if the heads are differently focused? I wonder with the side mode switch - will it turn on in color if that was the previous mode?
    The TK32 has a much bigger reflector so will throw more, no contest.
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    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    >Where do Fenix say that? All the information I have is that the secondary LEDs have a 100mW output. This doesn't easily translate into an OTF Lumen figure. I measure OTF lumens in an integrating sphere.
    >

    the product description at FenixStore. Boy the new site design sucks.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Fenix TK32 - 'Compact Review' (1x18650, 2xCR123 or 2xRCR123)

    As of Dec 2016, the 2016 model of the TK32LE colored LED specs are:


    • Red High: 105 Lumens - 4 hr. 15 min. (213 feet/65 meters)
    • Red Low: 15 Lumens - 65 hr. (75 feet/23 meters)
    • Green High: 165 Lumens - 5 hr. 30 min. (344 feet/105 meters)
    • Green Low: 30 Lumens - 40 hrs. (147 feet/45 meters)


    But now I want the white/red/green with the twisty spot-to-flood mechanism like the FD30 or FD41.

    Also the 2016 edition has a lot less flood to the beam.
    see
    http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?422724-Review-Fenix-TK32-2016-XP-L-HI-V3-XQ-E-color-1000-165-105-lumens-beamshots-compare&highlight=tk32

    Oh, and the runtime graph seems to show that it only holds 1000 lumen for a really short time. Truthfully a 900 Lumen light. Wonder what the 2016 edition looks like.

    Last edited by lumen aeternum; 12-31-2016 at 05:55 AM.

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