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Thread: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIMES+

  1. #1

    Rolleye11 Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTIMES+





    Eagletac has recently updated their series of high-output lights, bringing several new classes to the fold. Late last year, I reviewed the MX25L4 Turbo, and today have the "compact" 3x18650 MX25L3C (6x Nichia 219 version) on hand for review.

    Note that this light comes in a couple of forms – the 6x Nichia 219 reviewed here, and a higher output 6x XP-G2 S2 cool version. But I'm partial to neutral white tints, and so requested the lower output Hi-CRI Nicha 219 model for review.

    Manufacturer Reported Specifications:
    (note: as always, these are simply what the manufacturer provides – scroll down to see my actual testing results).

    • Cool White: 6x Cree XP-G2 S2 LED (CRI 70) 6500K
    • Neutral White: 6x Nichia 219 D220 SW45 LED (CRI 92) 4500K (Reviewer's note - at least one dealer describes these as "B11")
    • ANSI FL-1 for 6x Cree XP-G2: Regular mode 2450-2065/1010/180/23 lumens, Runtime 1.6/3.5/22/350 hours – Tactical mode 2450-2065/230/Strobe I/II, Runtime 1.6/20 hours
    • ANSI FL-1 for 6x Nichia 219: 1810-1545/760/145/19 lumens, Runtime 1.4/3.2/21/350 hours – Tactical mode 1810-1545/175/Strobe I/II, Runtime 1.4/19 hours
    • Beam Intensity (6x Cree XP-G2 version): 42,000 lux
    • Beam Distance (6x Cree XP-G2 version): 448 yards / 410 meters
    • Center spot angle (6x Cree XP-G2 version): 7.4°, Spill light angle: 63.6°
    • Beam Intensity (6x Nichia 219 version): 25,000 lux
    • Beam Distance (6x Nichia 219 version): 347 yards / 317 meters
    • Center spot angle (6x Nichia 219 version): 7.2°, Spill light angle: 63.9°
    • Powered by 3x18650 Li-ion or 6xCR123A (do not use 6x RCR123A)
    • Voltage range: 5.4V – 19V
    • Two groups of basic output modes, Regular mode (100% / 45% / 8% / 1%) and Tactical mode (100% / 10% / Strobe I / Strobe II) - user selectable
    • Brightness level selected by loosening/tightening head/bezel
    • Four levels brightness (user selectable sets) and seven hidden auxillary modes – Strobe I / Strobe II (Var) / Flash (Hi) / S.O.S. I (Fast) / S.O.S. II (Slow) / Beacon / Flash (Lo)
    • Waterwhite glass lens w/ harden treatment
    • Anti-reflective (AR) coating on both sides (96% transparency)
    • HA III hard anodization aerospace aluminum (black)
    • Smooth aluminum reflector
    • Waterproof IPX-8 standard
    • Warranty: Ten years performance guaranteed warranty
    • Dimensions: Head Diameter 2.5 inches (62 mm), Body Diameter 1.8 inches (45.5 mm), Length: 5.6 inches (141 mm), Weight: 11.6 ounces (330 grams)
    • Included Accessories: Spare o-rings, User Manual, Mil-Spec Para-cord Lanyard w/ quick attachment clip, Flat tail-cap (tail-stand), 3xCR123A Battery Magazines,
    • Include with kit version: Extra signal connection through the body tube for rear accessories add-on, extra tailcap w/ switch and tail-standing ability, stainless steel bezel, heavy duty Nylon holster w/ self-retention devices and open-top design, ET54 diffuser and color filters
    • MSRP: ~$155 (~190 in full kit form)



    As with other recent Eagletac models, the MX25L3C comes securely packaged in an Eagletac cardboard box. Included accessories are a paracord wrist lanyard, extra o-rings, three CR123A anti-rattle magazine holders, tailcap with secondary switch (kit version only), rigid belt holster (kit version only), manual, and warranty card.

    Although mine is the basic kit form, I didn't get the diffuser or colored filter set to review.




    From left to right: Keeppower protected 18650 3100mAh; Eagletac MX25L3C Compact, SX25L3, MX25L4 Turbo; L3 Illumination X40; Fenix TK75; Supbeam X60.

    All dimensions are directly measured, and given with no batteries installed:

    Eagletac MX25L3C 3x18650: Weight: 345.9g, 352.0g with kit tailcap (485-491g with 4x18650), Length: 141.9mm, 143.6mm with kit tailcap, Width (bezel): 61.9mm
    Eagletac MX25L4 Turbo 4x18650: Weight: 741.0g (926g with 4x18650), Length: 203mm, Width (bezel): 92.7mm
    Eagletac MX25L2 2x18650: Weight: 468.7g (with battery pack: 744g), Length: 266mm, Width (bezel): 62.0mm
    Eagletac SX25L3 3x18650: Weight: 315.9g, Length: 150.2mm, Weight (bezel): 47.0mm

    Fenix TK61: Weight: 605.7g (791g with 4x18650), Length: 218mm, Width (bezel): 96.0mm
    Fenix TK75: Weight: 516.0g (701g with 4x18650), Length: 184mm, Width (bezel): 87.5mm
    Nitecore TM06: Weight: 276.4g (464g with 4x18650), Length 123.9mm, Width (bezel): 50.0mm
    Nitecore TM15: Weight: 450.6g (639g with 4x18650). Length 158mm, Width (bezel): 59.5mm
    Niwalker BK-FA01: Weight: 682.3g (865g with 4x18650), Length: 209mm, Width (bezel): 80.0mm, Width (tailcap): 50.3mm
    Thrunite TN36: Weight: 390.4g (578g with 4x18650), Length: 125.4mm, Width (bezel): 64.0mm
    SupBeam K50: Weight: 645.0g (828g with 4x18650), Length: 230mm, Width (bezel): 90.1mm
    SupBeam X60: Weight: 920.7g (1201g with 6x18650) Length: 277mm, Width (bezel): 108.0mm








    The MX25L3C series carries on the robust tradition of the larger MX25 and SX25 series lights. The MX25L3C is a solid model, with good weight and decent hand ergonomics. The enlarged head of this "compact" version is still quite reasonable (i.e., not as unwieldy as the Turbo heads on some models).

    Unlike some of the other Eagletac lights I've handled, knurling is of mild aggressiveness on the MX25L3C. Anodizing is glossy black, hard anodized (i.e., type III). There were no chips in the anodizing on my sample (although that is not uncommon on find on some samples. There are a reasonable number of labels, and all are bright and clear (sharp white against the black background).

    As with other recent Eagletac lights that use a head switching mechanism, there are a series of spring-mounted pins in the head that are required to interpret the output state of the light. The thickness and quality of these pins looks similar to my MX25L4, which were improved compared to some of the earlier MX25L2 models I tested.

    The electronic switch in the head controls on-off when the tailcap is connected, with output mode selection and programming controlled by head twist. This is the same as the other recent SX25/MX25xx-series lights, although the design of the contact points in the head can vary somewhat (scroll down for a UI discussion). Side-switch feel is good for an electronic switch – there is a reasonable traverse, and the action is firm. Grip is good with the texturized rubber button cover.

    Screw threads in the head region are square-cut (and thick). This is where mode switching occurs, as with the other recent Eagletac lights, so you need to keep the contact surfaces here scrupulously clean.

    Similar to the recent SX25L3, the MX25L3C doesn't use a battery carrier, but instead has cut-out wells for the cells. And like the SX25L3, the cells are arranged in continuous series (i.e. 1p3s). Connection is made by contacts on a connector piece in the tailcap. The tailcap connector can spin freely, and locks in place to a set of holes in the body that line up with rods in the tailcap. With the optional kit tailcap, you get a slightly raised base and a secondary switch that functions exactly the same as the main switch in the head (i.e., switch function is identical).

    The MX25L3C can tailstand with either tailcap, and there is a wrist lanyard strap attachment point on the side of the body.

    Screw threading on the tailcap is traditional triangular cut, and is anodized. Lock-out is possible, with a quick twist of the tailcap (works on both the regulator tailcap, and the kit version). Thread feel is very smooth on my sample.






    The MX25L4 Turbo reflector is composed of six separate wells, each smooth and shiny (and relatively deep for the small size). At the base of each reflector is a Nichia 219 neutral white emitter (XP-G2 cool white also available).

    Scroll down for beamshots and output measures.

    User Interface

    The MX25L3C interface is very similar to other SX25/MX25xx series lights. Turn the light on/off by the electronic switch. Press and hold for momentary, press-release (i.e. click) for locked-on.

    There are four output levels controlled by how loose/tight the head is (i.e., the four levels are accessed in sequence from head fully tight).

    Note that as with other Eagletac lights that use this interface, the physical turning distance between the levels is not equidistant. As soon as you loosen past fully tight, you drop down to the second level. You drop down again to the third level quickly after a partial turn, and similarly again for the fourth level after another turn. By ~100 degree turn on my sample, you are into the fourth mode. This means that you can jump to the lower modes very quickly. The light remains in the lowest mode until you complete almost a full turn from fully tight (at which point the light shuts off).

    There are two possible groups of output modes available - Regular (100% > 45% > 8% > 1%, in sequence from fully tight) and Tactical (100% > 10% > Strobe I > Strobe II, in sequence). You can switch between the two groups by turning the light on max (fully tight) and loosening the head to the second level and then back to tight, repeating this sequence five times in five seconds.

    You can access a momentary Turbo from any head position by a press-and-hold of the switch when On. You can similarly access strobe at any time by a double press and hold (i.e. click and press-hold). Strobe is accessible even from Off with this maneuver. Simply release the switch to return to your previous head-set level.

    To access the hidden auxiliary modes, do a quick loosen-tighten twist of the head (from first level tight to third or fourth level and back again). Repeat this twist to advance through the modes. Mode sequence is: Strobe I > Strobe II > Hi-Flash > SOS I (fast) > SOS II (slow) > Beacon > Lo-Flash, in repeating sequence. Turn off the light or loosen the head to quit the hidden modes. FYI, I have found that they have relaxed the timings for these maneuvers, compared to earlier lights. You no longer have to frantically twist the head – an even motion will do the trick. In fact, it works more consistently if you take your time.

    On the MX25L3C (like some of the SXX25/MX25xx series lights), there is an option to reduce the "energy saving feature" of Turbo output. By default, the light will drop 25% in output from Turbo when 200 secs is reached. If you turn this feature off, the light will only drop 10% in output. As always, you can turn the light off-on to restart the max output mode.

    The secondary tailswitch from the kit version functions exactly the same as the main switch in the head.

    Video:

    For more detailed information, including general build and user interface, please see my video overview:



    For all my videos, I recommend you have annotations turned on. I commonly update the commentary with additional information or clarifications before publicly releasing the video.

    As an aside, if you want to get an instant notification for every new review that I post, you can subscribe to my YouTube channel. The vids go public at the same time as the reviews here on CPF.

    Strobe

    As before, there is no sign of PWM at any output level on the MX25L3C – I presume all levels are current-controlled. Shown below are the auxillary modes of from my MX25L4T review, which are exactly the same as my MX25L3C sample.

    Strobe I:


    The main strobe is a high frequency strobe, measured at 13.7 Hz on my MX25L4.

    Strobe II:


    The second strobe mode is an alternating or "oscillating" strobe, switching between 8.3Hz and 15.9Hz every 2 seconds. Here is a blow-up of the two frequencies:




    Hi-Flash:


    Hi-Flash is basically a full power slow strobe/beacon mode. Frequency was a reasonable 2.3Hz in my testing.

    SOS I:


    The "fast" SOS signals the full SOS sequence (dot-dot-dot, dash-dash-dash, dot-dot-dot) in just over 2 secs. These seems unusually quick to me.

    SOS II:


    In contrast, the "slow" SOS takes just under 2 seconds just do the "S" (i.e. dot-dot-dot), and about 2.5 seconds to do the "O" (i.e., dash-dash-dash), with >5 secs in-between each sequence. Personally, this seems far more useful than the rather frenetic initial SOS mode.

    Beacon:


    Beacon is a slow full output burst that is 2 secs long, re-occurring every 20 secs (i.e., a very slow beacon).

    Lo-Flash:


    Lo-Flash is a lower output, slower frequency strobe/beacon than Hi-Flash. It's hard to see on the traces above (due to the relatively low output), but I measured a frequency of ~0.6 Hz.

    Standby Drain

    A standby current drain is inevitable on these types of lights, due to the electronic switch in the head/tail.

    On my MX25L3C, I measured the drain as 635uA. For 3400mAh 18650 batteries (assuming a 3s1p arrangement), that would translate into ~7.5 months before they would be fully drained. This is higher than my other Eagletac lights (which typically would give you 2-3 years before fully draining cells). As such, recommend you lock out the light at the tailcap when not in use - to block this drain, and to prevent accidental activation.

    Beamshots:

    And now, what you have all been waiting for. All lights are on their respective battery sources, about ~0.75 meter from a white wall (with the camera ~1.25 meters back from the wall). Automatic white balance used on the cool white lights (to minimize tint differences), and Daylight white balance used on the neutral white lights (i.e., MT-G2 and Nichia 219).

    Let's start with a comparison of the MX25L3C to some other recent high-output Eagletac lights.













    And now some competing lights in this class.













    As always, it's hard to tell much about peak intensity throw at such ridiculously close distances. But the above does give you an idea of the what the relative beam pattern looks like, compared to the competition (i.e., it is not as floody as the MT-G2 lights, with their wider hotspots and wider spillbeams).

    You also really can't say much about tint from a single white balance. However, you can see that while the Nichia 219 does produce a Neutral White tint, it "rosier" than the usual neutral white MT-G2s.

    Outdoors beam shots are not feasible with the mounds of snow everywhere here right now. So here are some shots from my basement. For your reference, the back of the couch is about 7 feet away (~2.3m) from the opening of the light, and the far wall is about 18 feet away (~5.9m). Below I am showing a couple of exposures, to allow you to better compare hotspot and spill. The camera is set to a Daylight white balance for all lights below. All lights on Turbo.





    Again, the Nicha 219 produces a "rosier" tint than a typical neutral white emitter, like the MT-G2. The multi-emitter MX25L3C is also a lot more "throwy" compared the the single/dual MT-G2 lights. Overall spillbeam with is about typical for a standard light (i.e., the MX25L3C is not a particularly "floody" specimen).

    Scroll down for direct beam measurements.

    Testing Method:

    All my output numbers are relative for my home-made light box setup, as described on my flashlightreviews.ca website. You can directly compare all my relative output values from different reviews - i.e. an output value of "10" in one graph is the same as "10" in another. All runtimes are done under a cooling fan, except for any extended run Lo/Min modes (i.e. >12 hours) which are done without cooling.

    I have devised a method for converting my lightbox relative output values (ROV) to estimated Lumens. See my How to convert Selfbuilt's Lightbox values to Lumens thread for more info.

    Throw/Output Summary Chart:

    My summary tables are reported in a manner consistent with the ANSI FL-1 standard for flashlight testing. Please see http://www.flashlightreviews.ca/FL1.htm for a discussion, and a description of all the terms used in these tables. Effective July 2012, I have updated all my Peak Intensity/Beam Distance measures with a NIST-certified Extech EA31 lightmeter (orange highlights).



    To better compare output levels, here is a comparison table.



    My lumen estimates generally correlate pretty well with the Eagletac ANSI FL-1 specs.

    Note the step-down on Turbo shown above is for the default step-down (rated at 25%, which seems accurate in my testing). See runtimes for an example with this feature turned "off" (i.e., 10% step-down).

    Output/Runtime Comparison:

    All runtimes in my recent reviews are done with protected 3100mAh 18650 batteries, based on the NCR18650A core.

    Let's start with a comparison of the main levels:



    As previously mentioned, on most Eagletac lights you have the option to control the degree of step-down on Turbo (occurs after 200 secs of continuous runtime). By default the light steps down by 25%, but you can switch this to a 10% step down.

    Runtime patterns are about what you would expect. Note that are some subtle fluctuations in output over time (i.e., not perfectly flat-regulated). But these are too small and gradual for you to be able to notice by eye. In practice, the output will seem rock-solid flat.

    As the batteries near exhaustion, warning flashes will start in the main beam. You can see evidence of these in a couple of cases above. Since the flashes are quick, and my sampling rate is long (30 secs), you wouldn't expect to see to many obvious examples of it in the runtime graphs.

    Let's see how the MX25L3C compares to the competition.




    Overall regulation patterns are very similar to the SX25L3. However, as you can see, the 6x Nichia emitters are not as efficient as the 1xMT-G2 on the SX25L3. Basically, this means that you get the same runtime as the SX25L3, but somewhat less output for each level. I suspect the 6xXP-G2 S2 version would give noticeably higher output, and be quite competitive for this class (i.e., at least as good as the 1xMT-G2).

    Previously, I used to use AW 2200mAh protected cells in my 18650 testing – so data for many of my older lights are only available in this format. Here is a comparison of how the MX25L3C performs on 2200mAh cells. Note that I won't be providing these sorts of comparisons for new lights any more.




    Again, not to belabor the point, but you can expect reduced output on the 6x Nichia, compared to equivalent runtime with 3x/4x XM-L2 or 1x/2x MT-G2 emitters.



    The CR123A runtime above requires a bit of explaining. I used my standard Rayovac (made-in-the-USA) CR123As for this test. Judging from the pattern, it looks like the built-in PTC feature kicked in to limit output and heat. I've seen this on a number of heavily driven multi-cell lights. Please see my CR123A battery round-up thread for a discussion. It looks like the PTC current limitation triggered the low voltage feature early as well.

    Potential Issues

    As with other Eagletac models where output mode is set by the degree the head is tightened, you need to keep all contact surfaces in the head scrupulously clean. Otherwise, you may experience mode switching problems due to contact surface issues.

    Output/runtime efficiency of the Nichia 219 version is not as high as competing as cool white XP-G2/XM-L2/MK-R-based lights, or the neutral white MT-G2 based lights. Basically, with the Nichia 219 you get less output – but equivalent runtime – compared to other Eagletac offerings. However, the Nichia 219 emitters do have a higher color rendition index (Hi CRI) than other emitter types.

    The MX25L3C is heavily-driven on max, so primary CR123As are not recommended for extended runs (i.e., you may trip the built-in PTC thermal safety feature on made-in-the-USA brands).

    Preliminary Observations

    The MX25L3 Compact is another nice addition to the Eagletac line of high-output, throw-style lights. I particularly like the Nichia 219 option, with their high color rendering ability (i.e., Hi CRI).

    I always liked the build and interface of these MX/SX series lights, and the MX25L3C is very similar to its predecessors. The handle looks the same as the regular MX25L3 (or SX25L3), and you get a relatively short and stubby head (compared to the large Turbo models). The MX25L3C is certainly more portable than many of the MX-series lights. Note there is still the slim lined SX25L3 to consider, if you want a single emitter model.

    As before, you have the ability to use both 18650 Li-ion and primary CR123A - although I recommend sticking with 18650, for their higher capacity and ability to handle high heat better.

    What is really distinctive here is the beam pattern – especially in this Nichia 219 form. I'm glad to see this option, as it produces one of the highest levels of color rendition. Note the Nichia 219 produces a more "rosy" tint neutral white than you might expect (i.e., makes most Cree neutral white tints look positively green in comparison). With whatever emitter choice you go with, expect a relatively balanced beam profile, with a fairly typical spillbeam width. The MX25L3C is neither a "thrower" nor a "flooder" really - it's something in-between, like a lot of high-output multi-emitter lights.

    There have been a few minor tweaks to the classic Eagletac interface over time, but nothing major. The MX25L3C seems to be identical in its features and timings to the MX25L4T that I reviewed last year. Overall output/runtime efficiency is still quite reasonable – but you do take an output hit with the Nichia 219 version. This is to be expected, as the warmer Nichia 219 doesn't produce as much as light as a typical cool white Cree emitter.

    The MX25L3C is certainly another option to consider in an (admittedly) increasingly crowded high-output landscape. To me, it is the Nichia 219 version that really sets this model apart from the crowd – you just don't typically see this level of color rendition in a high-output light.

    ----

    MX25L3C Nichia 219 was provided by Eagletac for review.
    Last edited by selfbuilt; 02-27-2015 at 02:59 PM.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
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  2. #2
    Flashaholic* bladesmith3's Avatar
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    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    I don't know if this is a stupid question or not. but. any chance you will test the 6x Cree XP-G2 S2 version? it seems different enough for its own test.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Quote Originally Posted by bladesmith3 View Post
    I don't know if this is a stupid question or not. but. any chance you will test the 6x Cree XP-G2 S2 version? it seems different enough for its own test.
    I don't think so ... but I do have a good number of additional Eagletac models on hand that I will getting to over the coming weeks.
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  4. #4
    *Flashaholic* Capolini's Avatar
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    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Thanks for the review!

    I always seem to notice my mistakes and others! Your line up has six[6] lights and you only mention Five[5] I believe it is the First one[MX25L3C ?] that is not mentioned.
    Last edited by Capolini; 02-27-2015 at 02:54 PM.
    Environment molds a person. Perseverance changes them. ,,,Capolini 10.21.2003

  5. #5

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Quote Originally Posted by Capolini View Post
    I always seem to notice my mistakes and others! Your line up has six[6] lights and you only mention Five[5] I believe it is the First one[MX25L3C ?] that is not mentioned.
    That is a funny one to miss - just added to the list.
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  6. #6
    Flashaholic* Ryp's Avatar
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    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Thanks for the review!

  7. #7

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Thanks for another review SB. I am with you about favoring warm vs cool tint lights. The first lights I purchased were all cool, now I don't consider another one unless it is a warm tint. Output is still important but not as important, to me anyway, as tint.

  8. #8
    Flashaholic*
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    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    When you had the cr123A PTC issue, that was only using the 10% step down [circa 350 ROLO], right?
    So it is possible that the 25% step down [circa 300 ROLO] could avoid that.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW View Post
    When you had the cr123A PTC issue, that was only using the 10% step down [circa 350 ROLO], right?
    So it is possible that the 25% step down [circa 300 ROLO] could avoid that.
    That's true - I always do my CR123A runtimes on the max setting of every light (so, 10% step-down in this case). It's possible the default 25% step-down would have prevented the PTC engagement on my Rayovacs.

    The main factor to keep in mind is the threshold set limit of the various PTCs out there. The made-in-the-USA brands consistently trigger much earlier in my testing - I doubt any of the popular made-in-China brands would have tripped, even at the 10% step-down level. But given the expense of getting everything in Canada, I tend to limit CR123A runtimes to just the one run ...
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
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  10. #10

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Thank you as always for the review selfbuilt. Based on the picture, seems like Eagletac had changed the Nichia 219A emitter B11 bin I have in my light to the 219B D220 bin emitter in selfbuilt's sample. However, it didn't seem like Eagletac increased the lumen on the spec like they did for XP-G to XP-G2 or XM-L to XM-L2.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Yes, those appear to be the newer 219B and not the 219A in my earlier model. That would explain the difference in output on turbo since the 219B is more efficient. Thanks for another great review, I am a big fan of the high CRI Nichia emitters.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Quote Originally Posted by ragnarok164 View Post
    Thank you as always for the review selfbuilt. Based on the picture, seems like Eagletac had changed the Nichia 219A emitter B11 bin I have in my light to the 219B D220 bin emitter in selfbuilt's sample. However, it didn't seem like Eagletac increased the lumen on the spec like they did for XP-G to XP-G2 or XM-L to XM-L2.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Tone View Post
    Yes, those appear to be the newer 219B and not the 219A in my earlier model. That would explain the difference in output on turbo since the 219B is more efficient. Thanks for another great review, I am a big fan of the high CRI Nichia emitters.
    Yes, I'm not an expert on Nichia bins, but it does seem like these are the newer 219B D220 emitters (as specified in the current ET spec sheet online for this model).

    In any case, I know what I like, and I really like this tint. There is just something so much more satisfying with the "rose-tinted" neutral white of the Nichias, compared to the more common "green-tinted" neutral whites. Hard to say how much of that preference is the actual higher CRI rating. But it's a very uncommon thing to find such a great tint at this level of output.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Quote Originally Posted by selfbuilt View Post
    Yes, I'm not an expert on Nichia bins, but it does seem like these are the newer 219B D220 emitters (as specified in the current ET spec sheet online for this model).

    In any case, I know what I like, and I really like this tint. There is just something so much more satisfying with the "rose-tinted" neutral white of the Nichias, compared to the more common "green-tinted" neutral whites. Hard to say how much of that preference is the actual higher CRI rating. But it's a very uncommon thing to find such a great tint at this level of output.
    I have quite a few hi CRI 4500K Nichia flashlights and I find the tint and color rendering very satisfying. The MX25L3C had both the great tint and color rendering plus plenty of output. The hi CRI Nichia has caused me to be very unsatisfied with my other neutral white lights with XM-L2 in them. Maybe someday Nichia will offer a hi CRI 4500K emitter with the same footprint as the XM-L2 to get closer to it's output.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    I usually prefer cool white, at least based on my experience with "warm" Zebralights. But, the Nichias are in a whole different class. The light quality from the MX25L3C-Nichia is fabulous. I really feel like I can see better and more comfortably. I'm not a huge fan of the interface, but the awesome light quality makes up for any other shortcomings.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Quote Originally Posted by sam7 View Post
    I usually prefer cool white, at least based on my experience with "warm" Zebralights. But, the Nichias are in a whole different class. The light quality from the MX25L3C-Nichia is fabulous. I really feel like I can see better and more comfortably. I'm not a huge fan of the interface, but the awesome light quality makes up for any other shortcomings.
    I picked one of these up about a month ago. Amazing tint and output! Nice big hotspot and some spill. I agree about the UI; I wish it has a single button similar to Zebralight.

    I have a feeling it will get pushed aside when my M43vn Nichia arrives, though!
    GOOD TINT!

  16. #16

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    I had mine under about 18" of water for about 4 minutes total. Enough water got into the head to cause some fogging. I opened it up and let it dry so no big deal, but definitely not the IPX-8 standard I expected.
    GOOD TINT!

  17. #17

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    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Hi Selfbuilt and thanks for the review!

    A bit late, but at the time of this review I was away from flashlights for a while. Because I have a few Nichia 219 dropins I really like the thought of such a bright light as MX25L3 with high CRI LED!
    I wonder about what you inform: "As with other Eagletac models where output mode is set by the degree the head is tightened, you need to keep all contact surfaces in the head scrupulously clean. Otherwise, you may experience mode switching problems due to contact surface issues."
    As long as you keep the contact surfaces clean, does this light work without annoying problem as jumping over mode? And is the resistance enough to avoid changing mode by it self? I understand other owners can give their input as well.

    Thanks, Patric
    Last edited by Swedpat; 12-14-2015 at 11:19 AM.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    I never had problems with any Eagletacs using the head-twist UI. Then again, they don't see any hardcore outdoor use. The resistance is enough to keep it from switching accidentally. There is also a decent amount of distance between the switching, except turbo>high which is a bit quicker.
    GOOD TINT!

  19. #19

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    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Quote Originally Posted by markr6 View Post
    I never had problems with any Eagletacs using the head-twist UI. Then again, they don't see any hardcore outdoor use. The resistance is enough to keep it from switching accidentally. There is also a decent amount of distance between the switching, except turbo>high which is a bit quicker.
    Thanks. Good to know!

  20. #20

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Quote Originally Posted by markr6 View Post
    I never had problems with any Eagletacs using the head-twist UI. Then again, they don't see any hardcore outdoor use. The resistance is enough to keep it from switching accidentally. There is also a decent amount of distance between the switching, except turbo>high which is a bit quicker.
    Yes, I would agree with this. The point is that if the contacts are not kept clean, you may have difficulty with accurate mode switching. But I've never had any problems with the light not staying in any given mode.
    Full list of all my reviews: flashlightreviews.ca. Latest hobby: whiskyanalysis.com. Latest flashlight review: Thrunite TN42.
    Gratefully accepting donations to my battery fund.

  21. #21

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    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Hi Selfbuilt,

    Two days ago I received MX25L3 Nichia 219. Very nice light. It feels good in the hand and while the knurling could be more aggressive the excavations in the body helps with the grip. Mode selection by turning the head works properly and feels smooth and fine. I got the light at a sale because it's discontinued and has been replaced by MX30L4XC. The successor uses 4 cells instead of 3 and is brighter. But it's also much more floodier with much less throw despite much higher output. And because I already have several set ups of three 18650s and none 4x18650 I found it a good choice. The tint is as expected very pleasant for the eyes. It looks pretty cool with the 6 reflectors, leads my thoughts to the rocket nozzles of the Saturn 5 rocket, just one more nozzle...

    But I have thought about the color rendition: it's good but I have really hard to see much improvement compared to Zebralight SC5w I got with the same package.
    And I recall this is in line with my earlier experience. The distinction between good and bad color rendition usually is not between "high CRI" and the other LEDs, but between high CRI/warm/neutral and cool.
    It's the cool white which really separates itself from the other. Warmer tints usually provide a color rendition close to for example Nichia 219, despite they are not classified as high CRI. This often is the case at least according to my personal perception.
    And I belong to the group of flashlight users who really find it more than worth to sacrifice some degree of output for getting a comfortable and pleasant tint for the eyes!

    Conclusion: MX25L3 Nichia 219 is a new great addition to my flashlight collection/selection.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Quote Originally Posted by Swedpat View Post
    I got the light at a sale because it's discontinued and has been replaced by MX30L4XC.
    Actually Swedpat, the MX25L3C has its newer rendition as the MX30L3C, basically the same light, but with 2 switches. Pretty nice especially if Eagletac ever decides to get serious with the simple and marketed feature of battery/voltage status. (white switch illuminates to indicate)

  23. #23

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Just got this light on sale too and it's fabulous. Thanks a lot for the consistently very good review which makes me purchase all my lights! This is the second Nichia light I got (the previous one is Eagletac D25LC2) and it will be used during my camping/hiking trips when searching for owls or other interesting things to look at night!

    This is also my fourth high CRI light. (the other 2 being FourSevens mini MA, Zebralight H502d). I'll definitely make my next light a high CRI one!

  24. #24

    Default Re: Eagletac MX25L3C Compact (6xNichia 219 3x18650/6xCR123A) Review: BEAMSHOTS, RUNTI

    Quote Originally Posted by starryalley View Post
    Just got this light on sale too and it's fabulous. Thanks a lot for the consistently very good review which makes me purchase all my lights! This is the second Nichia light I got (the previous one is Eagletac D25LC2) and it will be used during my camping/hiking trips when searching for owls or other interesting things to look at night!

    This is also my fourth high CRI light. (the other 2 being FourSevens mini MA, Zebralight H502d). I'll definitely make my next light a high CRI one!
    Glad you like it. It's one of my favorites. They tried to "update" it with the MX30L3C, but IMO failed. The dual button design was a good idea, but the back button is nearly flush with the body and hard to press. The MX25 is much, much easier! Great price on sale too.
    GOOD TINT!

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