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Thread: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

  1. #31

    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Quote Originally Posted by RedLed View Post
    Well, I just called 3M, and this is what they told me, and I am a skeptic with big companies, they told am ANY of their UV glasses are the tested from 200nm to 380nm, I told them I was working with 365nm, and they said I should be good to as these were the most dangerous of the UV ratings, and anything below 280nm all the way through all the UV spectrums would be safe.

    Really? I just don't know. What do you think? I am not ready to believe this at this point in time. I feel like calling back and talking to someone other than a CS Rep.
    The real issue is a spectrograph of the alleged 356nm. What's the actual frequency range? If it's 200-380nm for "any 3m uv glasses," and the emitter is also spewing 390nm, for example...

    UV-A goes up to 400nm. Why would supposedly good UV glasses stop at 380nm? UV-A would still get through?

    and anything below 280nm all the way through all the UV spectrums would be safe.
    I think something's wrong with what that CS rep said. ANY wavelength can be harmful at a high enough intensity. A strong enough exposure of UV can overwhelm any eye protection. Something is better than nothing, but you can't just throw on any old UV glasses for all conditions.

    Quote Originally Posted by RI Chevy View Post
    Maybe check with an optometrist or call a medical college that specializes in eyes and ask them and see what they say?
    A dentist as well, they work with UV for that conversion stuff they use for fillings now. They have all kinds of safety regs for X ray, I'm sure they are required to know about UV hazard as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by RI Chevy View Post
    I wonder if Norland has any information on UV goggles?
    You'd think they would.
    Last edited by more_vampires; 10-01-2015 at 11:40 AM.

  2. #32
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    I have a feeling many workers are not properly protected, we can cover our eyes for 4 seconds for Norland to set, but tradesmen working all day are going to have huge problems some day.

    When I travel I notice the TSA use, I forget the name of the light! and the UV reflects back at them off the ID's, that can't be good and no Govt. Supplied eveware to be seen.

    It would seem to me that with as much UV being used today, the exact proper eye protection would be available to people?

    What nn do dentists use, and on TV shows they spray that stuff then turn in a gigantic UV light, is this a Prop, or something? however they always make sure every one has eveware on?
    Check my Web Site: www.Redwayphoto.com

  3. #33

    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    UV at low intensities isn't damaging unless you stare into it all day.

    "Black light," for example, contains UV.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_light
    A black light, also referred to as a UV-A light, Wood's light, or simply ultraviolet light, is a lamp that emits long wave (UV-A) ultraviolet light and not much visible light.[1][2][3][4] The lamp has a violet filter material, either on the bulb or in a separate glass filter in the lamp housing, which blocks most visible light and allows through UV,[3] so the lamp has a dim violet glow when operating.[5][6] Black light bulbs which have this filter have a lighting industry designation that includes the letters "BLB".[3][5]

    A second type of bulb, which is also called a black light, produces ultraviolet but does not have the filter material, so it produces more visible light and has a blue color when operating.[3][4][5] These are made for use in "bug zapper" insect traps and are identified by the industry designation "BL".[5][6]
    Black light sources may be specially designed fluorescent lamps, mercury vapor lamps, light-emitting diodes, lasers, or incandescent lamps.[5][6] In medicine, forensics, and some other scientific fields, such a light source is referred to as a Wood's lamp (named after Robert Williams Wood).
    Although many other types of lamp emit ultraviolet light with visible light, black lights are essential when UV-A light without visible light is needed, particularly in observing fluorescence,[4][5] the colored glow that many substances emit when exposed to UV. Black lights are employed for decorative and artistic lighting effects, diagnostic and therapeutic uses in medicine,[3] the detection of substances tagged with fluorescent dyes, rock-hunting, the detection of counterfeit money, the curing of plastic resins, and attracting insects.[4] Strong sources of long-wave ultraviolet light are used in tanning beds.[4] Although the low power UV-A emitted by black lights is not a hazard to skin or eyes and can be viewed without protection, powerful ultraviolet sources present dangers and require personal protective equipment such as goggles and gloves.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Person...Eye_protection
    Each day, about 2000 US workers have a job-related eye injury that requires medical attention.[6]
    What NMR do dentists use?
    Ah HA!
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dental...D_curing_light
    The dental LED curing lights use LED’s that produce a narrow spectrum of blue light in the 400- to 500-nm range (with a peak wavelength of about 460nm), which is the useful energy range for activating the CPQ molecule most commonly used to initiate the photo-polymerization of dental monomers."[6]
    The newest[when?] LED curing light is the HP (high powered LED light). It is an updated LED curing light that cures material much faster than the Halogen and the previous LED curing lights. It uses a single high-intensity blue LED with a larger semi conductor crystal.[6] Light intensity and the area that is illuminated has been increased with an output of 1,000 mW/cm2.[6] In order to emit such a high intensity light, it uses a highly reflective mirror film that consisting of "multilayer polymer film technology."[6]
    The dental curing lights I've seen have a small yellow-orange shield about the size of a snuff can for the operator to look through. I've never seen dental people wear eye protection. The burst are also very short. It's in the few seconds these days, with that 1 watt/cm^2.

    They do it often. Do they need protection? Maybe. 1 watt/cm^2 in a power emitter. Small point. Perhaps they're hoping to never look directly into it or reflect it off a shiny surface.
    Last edited by more_vampires; 09-30-2015 at 01:08 PM.

  4. #34
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    The TSA guys use an INNOVA light.

  5. #35
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Yes, how could I for get that. I had a white one and it stopped working, so into the trash it went!

    Thanks,

    RL
    Last edited by RedLed; 10-01-2015 at 02:30 AM.
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  6. #36
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    http://web.mit.edu/cohengroup/safety/uv110720safety.pdf

    Yes, I am breaking the hot link rules for a darn good reason, as people's eyesight, and future depend upon it, so let it ride. Also, legal, liability may be involved here, do you really want anything to happen to a registered or non member here?

    This is is from MIT, one of the world's most revered universities who, got us to the Moon, the internet among many other thing and we really, really need your opinion More_ vampires, can you look this over and advise on this, so no one has serious eye damage.

    What do make of this?

    This is above my pay grade. However, my neighbor across the street is right as his pay grade! And when I told him about this, his response was "Oh God." He worked on Apollo 11, and the B1 Bomber. Plus he has one one of the most amazing Corvette collections that anyone will ever see, Very smart man. One of our nations best!

    All I am asking for is a set of goggles, or glasses safe enough to do this Norland work with no eye damage to people. It can't be that impossible?

    CPF...Thanks for letting me avoid the hot link rule this time, as people could be damaging their eyes unknowingly! And I am certain you do not want or need that kind of trouble.


    Thanks, CPF!

    And all the best to you, and all your members!

    RL
    Last edited by RedLed; 10-01-2015 at 02:53 AM.
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  7. #37

    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Interesting read. It presents further research, processing it now.

    First impression was "my God, they've got a 2 megajoule/cm2 365nm UV-A source?" Then I realized that was only .555 kw-hr. "Only."

    How to Limit Danger
    Whenever you switch to use the fluorescent bulb on the microscope alwayshave the filter in place beforehand!
    failure could burn cornea!

    Wear protective gloves, sleeves and UV protection glasses when using the UV lamps (especially the 253 nm lamp). Limit direct exposure.
    Keep in mind they've got a heck of a UV source in that link. They're saying the level of power they're using can actually degrade your DNA! WOW!

    The best advice in that link is "avoid direct exposure." The take-away from that is don't look directly into the UV source. Dentists never do that. They place the light, hit it, and done. They don't wave it around the room. I think this in of itself is as or more important than what eye protection is selected.

    Also, it's time to know what emitter and wattage is being used on the McGizmo UV light. It's the final piece of the puzzle. Only then is it possible to calculate what OD is needed at a minimum. Intensity is a major variable. If we cannot assume the user won't do something you're not supposed to do, such as look directly into the UV or wave the light around and nail themselves on a reflective surface, then we must calculate for a direct exposure. If we assume the user uses safe handling practices, then we can calculate for the scattered exposure from looking at the item being illuminated with the curing light.

    Something I often say is "Technique trumps gear, knowledge is more important than gear." A work around to eye protection would be to steady the work piece, place the light, close eyes, hit the light. Mounting the light in a work clamp would be most helpful. That'd probably be fine for a couple shots for a few seconds each. Likely, most of us will not be doing this work all day every day for years.

    With a workstand holding the UV and the item to be cured, you know where everything is and could simply drape a heavy black trash bag over it. In that case, we don't even NEED eyewear. The item gets cured, the user receives no exposure.

    The McGizmo UV isn't a super-blaster, is it? Polyvinylchloride sheeting (UV blocking welding curtain) draped over a workstand with the clamped light and workpiece could be plenty if the user can be trusted to have the sheeting in place when the light is lit and make no other mistakes.

    Also, I finally ran across visible spectrum CLEAR safety glasses. I'm still trying to determine if the OD is strong enough for the intensity, but now it's time to talk about the McGizmo UV light itself.

    The American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) publishes Threshold Limit Values (TLVs),
    UV-A (315 nm to 400 nm), the ACGIH recommends 1.0 J/cm2 for periods lasting less than 1000 seconds.
    All of their pubs are behind a paywall and require a login.

    On the plus side, we now have an upper limit for exposure from "the pros."

    After all of this reading, I would not look directly into ANY UV high power led emitter. I think that's something we can all agree on.
    Last edited by more_vampires; 10-01-2015 at 10:02 AM.

  8. #38

    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-e...e-light_hazard
    Blue-light hazard is defined as the potential for a photochemical induced retinal injury resulting from electromagnetic radiation exposure at wavelengths primarily between 400–500 nm. This has not been shown to occur in humans, only inconclusively in some rodent, primate and in vitro studies.[4] The mechanisms for photochemical induced retinal injury are caused by the absorption of light by photoreceptors in the eye. Under normal conditions when light hits a photoreceptor, the cell bleaches and becomes useless until it has recovered through a metabolic process called the visual cycle.[5][6]

    Absorption of blue light, however, has been shown in rats and a susceptible strain of mice to cause a reversal of the process where cells become unbleached and responsive again to light before they are ready. At wavelengths of blue light below 430 nm this greatly increases the potential for oxidative damage.[7] For blue-light circadian therapy, harm is minimized by employing blue light at the near-green end of the blue spectrum. "1-2 min of 408 nm and 25 minutes of 430 nm are sufficient to cause irreversible death of photoreceptors and lesions of the retinal pigment epithelium. ... The action spectrum of light-sensitive retinal ganglion cells was found to peak at 470-480 nm, a range with lower damage potential, yet not completely outside the damaging range."[8] A 2014 study found that LEDs cause retinal damage even in settings where they are used indirectly, such as household light bulbs.[9]
    A 2013 in vitro study using shorter blue band spectrum LED lights indicated that prolonged exposure may permanently damage the pigment epithelial cells of the retina. The test conditions were the equivalent of staring at a 100 watt blue incandescent source from 20 cm (8 in) for 12 hours.[10][11]
    http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/...you-see-things
    EEK! I was not up on UV like I am now when I posted in that thread! I would have immediately said "Don't do that!"

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?u...indexed=google
    MATERIALS AND METHODS:
    Young adult rhesus monkeys were anesthetized, and received blue LED exposure from a modified slit-lamp. A 3 mm beam of 0.85 mW was imaged onto the retina through a lens positioned before the cornea and exposure damage was determined at time intervals for 12 to 90 min. Fundus photography, fluorescein angiography(FAG), retinal tomography(HRT), and s-cone electororetinogram(S-ERG) were recorded at baseline, 2, and 30 days.
    RESULTS:

    Two days after 40 min exposure, there was a grey, discolored region, which was over-fluorescent in FAG, and an incresse in HRT and S-ERG corresponding to the site which was exposed to LED light. In histological examination at 30 days, the LED had caused produced a marked disruption of the disks of photoreceptor cells, damaged retinal pigment epithelium(RPE) apical villi, and a loss of RPE melanin after 90 min exposure.
    CONCLUSION:

    A threshold level was found around 40 min. This morphological damage may impair function and continuous exposure to blue light is potentially dangerous to vision.
    Ouch, damage from 40 min exposure @ .85 MILLIwatts? Wow. 3mm is an extremely tight beam, though. This would be like holding the UV light up directly to your eye, except I think the McGizmo UV is quite a bit more than .85 milliwatts.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1...d_Discovery_RA
    Light damage research began during the early years of laser light exploration. There is a clear and significant literature that identifies an easily demonstrated retina-pigment epithelium pathology which is associated with short wavelength exposures below 520 nm. Recent interest has expanded because of the growing evidence for a blue light contribution to the retina aging process by way of a poorly understood chemical process(es) that involve circulation, oxidative reactions and the spectral absorption properties of the pigment epithelium. New powerful sources of relatively inexpensive blue energy have become available as a family of light emitting diodes. In this experiment, we examined funduscopic, angiographic and scanning laser tomographic measures of the retinal-pigment epithelium response to LED and laser spectral blue and infrared emissions closely matched in wavelengths and delivered under carefully matched circumstances. Ten retinas in normal young rhesus monkeys were locally exposed to various energy density values at 458 nm (Argon laser) ranging from 5 to 54 J cm(-2). Eight rhesus eyes were exposed to LED irradiation with a peak wavelength of 460 nm ranging from 9 to 62 J cm(-2). Similarly, a matched infrared (IR) laser and IR LED pair were used to expose an additional ten eyes for comparison of the long wavelengths. IR irradiance ranged from 21 to 306 J cm(-2). There was no response to IR exposure in any of the eyes. Blue light exposure results were measured from the color fundus photographs, scanning laser tomographs and early- and late-phase fluorescein angiogram responses at 2 and 30 days after the exposure. Results scores were accumulated for the four measures at the two time periods. The resulting lesion scores when plotted against the exposure in J cm(-2)showed no demonstrable effect at irradiance lower than 10 J cm(-2)and near 100% effectiveness for irradiance greater than 30 J cm(-2). The most sensitive and enduring indicator of change was the late fluorescein angiograms. Nonparametric statistical analysis of the scores from the two samples support the conclusion that there is no difference in the consequences of LED and laser light exposures under these matched conditions.
    30 J cm(-2) sounds like bad medicine.

    http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/...tly-into-it%29
    Last edited by more_vampires; 10-01-2015 at 11:44 AM.

  9. #39

    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    The TL;DR summary for dummies:
    NEVER look directly into a UV emitter, laser or led. Even if you have UV eye protection, this is something you're not supposed to do.

    Don't do it. From what I understand, the McGizmo UV is quite capable of doing damage.
    the conclusion that there is no difference in the consequences of LED and laser light exposures under these matched conditions.
    Thanks to CPFer FritzHID for getting me started on the road to learning about UV hazard. He insisted that I need to know about it. The 55 watt HID is fun.
    Last edited by more_vampires; 10-01-2015 at 11:47 AM.

  10. #40

    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Quote Originally Posted by RedLed View Post
    All I am asking for is a set of goggles, or glasses safe enough to do this Norland work with no eye damage to people. It can't be that impossible?
    Impossible? No.

    Complicated? Yes.

    It's not just the goggles. The goggles do nothing, as they say.

    It's a combined system. The eye wear OD hinges upon beam intensity, focus, and the cumulative exposure duration. If you're looking directly into the focused emitter at arm's length you will need massively more OD than if you have the light off, aim it, turn it on for a few seconds to cure the Norland, then turn it off. There's a lot of variables.

    If the flashlight is highly polished, you're going to need a higher OD again.

    The science answer to this question hinges on a great many aspects of science. Reflectivity of the flashlight being cured is also a factor.

    We could err on the safe side and get the highest OD we can. The danger is when the protective gear isn't good enough for the threat.

    The Simple Answer: Get a pair of arc welding goggles, cover all exposed skin, set up a work stand, run the light with a heavy duty trash bag over it to block all light emitted. There is zero way for a light output such as a UV flashlight with power led to hurt you at this point. You'll have trouble seeing, so a solution for that is the work area to be extremely well lit. Don't walk around with the welding goggles on if you can't see. Some of them have flip up shades, those would probably be best. Is there such a thing as "too safe?"

    Could you just simply use the welding goggles? Most likely so due to the power levels involved. A UV flashlight is orders of magnitude weaker than a welding arc.

    If it isn't overkill yet, then you're just not using enough.

    Also, welding goggles are cheaper than NoIR products.

    Thanks for patiently wading through the CPF UV Hazard thread.

    Anything else I can help with?
    http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/...r-eyes-and-DNA
    Last edited by more_vampires; 10-01-2015 at 12:42 PM.

  11. #41
    RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Well, this has been amazing reading here. You are a very well educated person, and I thank you for your time.

    I want to get a UV light from Don, not only for Norland, also, for looking in the desert for things that light up, and for a frequent traveller, to check around hotel rooms, you know from all the wild times that take place in hotels. That is what I wanted some UV glasses.

    In film days of photography, we had light proof bags for 120 and 220 film as 120 had a paper backing only, and not very good, protection, 220 had nothing so it went right in a lightproof bag marked with the job titles. You know, I bet it is that welding sheeting you speak of, is sure looked like it. It may be hard to find photographic lightproof bags these days but not impossible.

    One last question, is how can a company, as well respected like 3M is, one most of us love, who make great products get away with telling us they have UV glasses with a span of UV light they cover but, does not do that? They make Post is for us, for God's sake?

    Do you think there any kind of safety glasses that exist for this, I would hate to travel with welding goggles, as I already take enough things with me?

    I think I will call Norland and see what they tell us, and let you know what they say so we can get your thoughts. One this is all figured out we could actually have fun with UV at the levels we are going for in these one of a kind custom lights.

    Thanks for your help,

    NR
    Last edited by RedLed; 10-01-2015 at 02:32 PM.
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  12. #42

    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Anytime friend, it was my pleasure.

    As far as 3M goes, there are many cases worldwide of some customer service rep having no clue what they are saying.

    As we said, intensity matters. A UV laser with enough intensity can defeat aluminum foil and burn through mirrors, nevermind whatever glasses the rep was speaking of. Sunglasses that claim to block 100% of UV will be a flaming puddle from something like that.

  13. #43
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    That is just awful they can get away with that, unbelievable!
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  14. #44

    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Pretty typical for a "level 1" representative. They read from a script and have no particular knowledge or training, else they'd be more than an L1!

    It's why when you have a really good tech problem that you must speak to more than one tech on the help line. They default you to L1 first.

    I've done my time on "hell desk." Can't say I liked it.

  15. #45
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    This corporate America straight, and why I work for myself. How they can put peoples eyesight in jeopardy is beyond me, no more Post it's for this office.

    All it really takes for a great company to a bad one is a bad CEO change, and it's all over for the once great American companies. It won't be long before all this is made in no standards China.

    What at a nightmare!
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  16. #46

    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Liability. That's what lawyers are for. For a company the size of 3M, that punitive settlement is going to be gigantic. Shouldn't take more than one hit to fix it.

    Anyway, the buyer is supposed to know what they are buying and what they are doing. The seller won't be there when the buyer zaps themselves.

    Kind of like buying a chainsaw and not knowing how to use it safely? The seller is going to sell.

  17. #47
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Called Norland and spoke to a CS Rep. In the technical division of the dept. that makes #60, and 61 the ones used here, so they knew exactly what I was talking about and while I did not ID my self as a journalist, I am trained to ask questions.

    They took all my info and to date no reply.

    I will give them one more try.

    Again in I say it. --"Before 9-11, safety; after security."
    Redled
    Last edited by RedLed; 10-04-2015 at 05:48 PM.
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  18. #48

    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    How long has Norland put you on hold? You'd think a company getting a call from a customer would want to sell some adhesive.

    Is it possible that they actually don't know or just bad CS?

  19. #49
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Quote Originally Posted by more_vampires View Post
    How long has Norland put you on hold? You'd think a company getting a call from a customer would want to sell some adhesive.

    Is it possible that they actually don't know or just bad CS?
    Been long enough for a follow up call - to the president of the company, or CEO - Customer service gets one chance with me, they claimed to even make glasses, but I bet their general councel may have something to do with this. Look, this is a DOD vendor, and other large corporations, that make who knows what, and they could care less about their employees.

    The thing is, there must me hundreds of thousands if not more people that work with UV everyday, so what do they use for protection?

    I have no doubt they, Norland, make fine products, and I wager they have no interest in people engaged in a hobby to tell us any thing or even sell the stuff, some companies that sell industrial products want company letterhead. Or to go through a sales Rep.

    Honestly, this is a simple question, however, it seems like trying to get in Fort Knox, and say "Hey, can we see the gold vault!" Would be much easier.

    I just wanted a nice quality pair of safety glasses tested and approved. I'm buying the UV from Don no matter, I will just watch how I use it. Which I would do anyway.

    To be fair to Norland, they were nice, and maybe there was a reason they could not get back to me. I know I can be very hard to get contact myself. I guess we all expect an instant response these days. So try again tomorrow.
    Last edited by RedLed; 10-05-2015 at 03:55 PM.
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  20. #50
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    When I fly I wonder if damage is done to the TSA people checking ID's all day with that INNOVA UV light bouncing back at them, or are those lights safe enough to have no problems.

    It it seems to me that time would take its toll no matter. Again I am no expert but, makes one wonder.

    Now, I am not a big fan to the TSA, but these people are still Americans and most are fine people I'm sure, just doing their job and do not deserve to have eye issues later in life. I sincerely hope they are not being over looked by the government, or some bureaucrat that does not care.

    The Goverment has had a long and awful history of not looking out for their employees, remember Agent Orange?

    Yes, even the TSA needs as good as the protection we seek.
    Last edited by RedLed; 10-05-2015 at 03:52 PM.
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  21. #51
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Meanwhile, if you UV users out there would not mind letting the rest of us know what you use for eye protection, that may help. I was sort of looking to find a pair of quality safety glasses we could seem to agree that, these are the one's to get.
    Check my Web Site: www.Redwayphoto.com

  22. #52
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Moderators, and arbitrator's

    Please...Consider:

    Can we move this out of the McGiz Forum to one more like alternative lighting, or something. Maybe start an exclusive UV sub forum for people to go their directly, seeking information on UV lights and the installation of Tritium Vials.

    It has gone past simple UV questions on Mr. McLeish's UVs, as well as, his sales forum. Mr McLeish, is far from the only one who makes UV Lights, and I think we could get a better discussion as some may be afraid to say something important feeling they may offend Don, after all, he is the real master of this craft.

    As as far as UV. Discussion, it has well exceeded it being debated in Mr. McLeish's sales sub forum.

    This is something that needs to be discussed but, let's get it out of someone's sales area. The lack of straight answers is frustrating, the subject belongs elsewhere, and something that bothers me to no end is no straight answers, no matter the subject, and I don't want all the pressure to, be on Mr. McLeish, the world's most prolific builder and designer of flashlights the world has ever seen!

    There are many, many more people here who know this subject of UV safety on a
    par beyond what the average person knows, and so far "More_ Vampires" is the only one who is a scientist, that has had the courage to speak up. Thanks MV! That means a lot to me as I am just trying to save people from eyesight trouble down the road, years from now.

    So, I ask it be moved out of this forum to another for further important discussion, and if this is all the information we get from this community, well that is Really sad indeed, as we know there are people on this forum who could offer advice, but don't, and maybe should not on a sales form such as Don's where so many of have had the her ill of buying one of his amazing lights.

    And, Because we all know some people are doing damage to their eyesight for the WOW! factor of some silly Trit vials. I feel it important the forum community have an area where people can read up on what they are doing before they start.

    Yes, Trit. Vials, they are great fun, cool and all,that and, I also, have them on some of my lights, however, they have been installed with industrial silicone glue.

    I will try Norland again for some information: meaning a response to my very simple questions, on eye protection, otherwise it may be time to abandon them for this purpose, as they have no interest in the consumer market. Really,,that is a big thing if they don't, and just want to stick to the DOD mega money. Certainly something to think about no matter how cool it is to have Norland.

    And, of course I know the feedback coming my way, and please understand I am far, far from The PC crowd but this is truly dangerous to, our flashlight colleagues here on CPF.

    Lasers have their own sub-forum in "Beyond Flashlights," should UV be in that area, I'm not certain, I will leave that to, the Moderators, I do think the time has come for UV to have a section of it's own for safety, this subject can be in the sales forums as an addition to, the product, and it, capabilities but, just general and safety discussion of eye damaging light, in a forum s well as discussion of the physics behind It, would be a great addition to CPF's educational aspects.

    I do feel the the time has come to move this out of the McGizmo forum, and into a forum dedicated to UV issues and the proper knowledge and handling for dealing with these unique and hazardous lights as they can be bought in any hardware store these days.

    Thank You, Moderators, I feel this is an important safety issue for all users experienced, or not to have it a place where people can seek information.

    A good place for this may be in Spotlights and HID Lights. Maybe?

    However, an exclusive about section UV flashlights would be an excellent idea, and very responsible on the part of the CPF Forum. With the the regard to care , use and handling of UV flashlights would really be perfect.

    Again in thank you.

    Also, sorry Don if this got too big for your forum, you know me as a customer and would nor want to do anything to cause you any trouble.

    With all best wishes,

    RL
    Last edited by RedLed; 10-08-2015 at 08:19 AM.
    Check my Web Site: www.Redwayphoto.com

  23. #53

    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    This is something that needs to be discussed but, let's get it out of someone's sales area.
    In flashlight general, CPF UV Hazard thread has been started.

    We can take this to there.

    http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/...r-eyes-and-DNA

    I know for certain that I don't know 100% of everything. Won't stop me from trying to help. Working together, we can achieve more than we can separately.

    Good luck, everyone!

  24. #54
    RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Quote Originally Posted by more_vampires View Post
    In flashlight general, CPF UV Hazard thread has been started.

    We can take this to there.

    http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/...r-eyes-and-DNA

    I know for certain that I don't know 100% of everything. Won't stop me from trying to help. Working together, we can achieve more than we can separately.

    Good luck, everyone!
    See my post in LED flashlights. I suggest the idea of a UV sub thread, and I honestly did not see your post, here MV, but do give you credit in the in one I made lobbying for a strictly UV sub forum.

    Really, I feel it's time has come. There are so many people are using UV lights these days, it is not a novelty any more.

    So, I want to cease and desist any and all comments referring to UV. Lights here in the McGizmo sub forum. With the exception of routine questions about Don's lights he can take care of himself.

    As the original OP, someone with higher powers please lock down this thread, and we will work on one somewhere else as I think it's moment has arrived.

    I had ad no idea it would get so big, sorry for that.

    And, Don sorry if I caused you any problems here. I will be placing an order for a UV and head soon. Thank you!
    Last edited by RedLed; 10-08-2015 at 06:22 PM.
    Check my Web Site: www.Redwayphoto.com

  25. #55

    Default Re: UV Glasses for Mc Gizmo UV lights

    Hello everyone - I am new to the forum, but have found it incredibly helpful. I thought I should chime in here.
    As many have pointed out, yes, we use 460nm curing lights in dentistry, but they are really not that bright. As someone else mentioned, that is why there is an orange shield on some lights.
    Where we need eye protection in dentistry is when we utilize soft tissue lasers. As many can attest, we have used metals to restore teeth for years. These are highly reflective, and when we are using 1.3W lasers in the mouth, an unexpected reflection from some metal could be catastrophic.

    "Innovative Optics" is a very high-end optical manufacturer that provides filters for dental loupes (magnification glasses).

    Their website has a "filter selection" page which will help you to find your need. "Dental patient protective eye wear" is also available from many reliable dental suppliers. Make sure to locate "orange", as these are designed to protect the eye from the 420-480nm curing lights used in dentistry.
    Last edited by Polymerize; 04-26-2016 at 06:50 AM.

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