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Thread: RIP Popular Photography

  1. #31
    Flashaholic* xdayv's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    You must have a storied career RedLED, well done!
    Dave
    "o-o-oh! oveready, okluma, oh no..."

  2. #32
    Flashaholic* RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Thank you very much.
    Check my Web Site: www.Redwayphoto.com

  3. #33

    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    A few years back my wife wanted in on wedding photography. Knowing she was woefully unprepared gear-wise, style-wise and know-how-wise I suggested she find a pro to assist.
    After doing 3 by herself she decided that wasn't her gig.

    She was great at thinking outside the box but did not understand the basics. So much of her better photos were dismissed by the client(s) who wanted same ole sameness. One evening I quipped "now do you understand the term starving artist?"

    I spent hours and hours tailoring white balances, shadows and evening out influences of various colored lighting in the ones the clients liked.
    Basically the ones she did were some of the worst possible scenarios which is why real pros had offered really high estimates. Indoor lighting near windows with afternoon sun and parking lot lights as the evenings progressed. A digital sensors worst fears in each of the 3 weddings.

    I set her up with some decent gear for the time and she ended up doing outdoor portraits of peoples dogs and cats. We found a little niche in our area that brought in enough revenue to buy a good printer, monitor calibration stuff and a few better lenses.

    One day her son asked if she'd take photos of the high school football team. Oh that pissed off a bunch of people. The wannbe types with their Canons and 70-200 lenses thought she was competition. To rub salt in the deal I walked around the field with a Nikon clad with a prime using a monopod. It was hilarious to see each week how those knuckleheads would react.

    I knew all along that doing the pro photographer thing was on the way to suffering the same fate as the VHS machines once I saw families at the beach with $3000 cameras stuck lens down on the edge of their towel. So these days I use my SLR's to photo-journalize things at my job as a roadway inspector and the wife uses her style to spice up eBay photos.
    We have both taken some killer wildlife photos along the way and have lots of good memories on a hard drive. We even got a few published in local magazines and newspapers. But when I see a fellow next to 3rd base at Candle Stick park with a $50k lens to take photos of the pitcher or another guy carrying his telescope sized lens clad camera over his shoulder... I do not regret never entering the dog-eat-dog process of trying to make a living taking photos.

    I do enjoy the times my boss tells me to drive to some area of the state and take pictures of a bridge about to be widened or an intersection about to be re-hab'd into a roundabout. As a consultant part of my job is to drum up business with local governments and the photographs are proof we've studied their upcoming projects.
    I take my SLR for personal use and a faithful point n shoot for their photos since they will be printed from a laptop dard drive onto office copy paper. It's kinda like being a pro with a guarenteed paycheck every other Thursday and no real pressure to get it perfect.... afterall it's just a rickety old bridge slated for demolition.

    It's a shame to see yet another staple in American photography be removed from the pages of upcoming history. But when I go to my local Books A Million and see all the bubble gum flavored crap disguised as photography magazines I'm surprised it is just now happening.
    John 3:16
    "The only friends I have from France are french fries" -PK

  4. #34

    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    It's a shame to heard about this, but certainly not surprising. I think there was a report recently saying how on Flickr the iPhone had become the most popular camera in the world. I must admit that when I travel I will often just bring my iPhone along, just because I don't want to drag along my heavy dSLR. Obviously the picture quality is not the same, but it really is so much more convenient

  5. #35
    Flashaholic* RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Fixer,

    Poor quality photos are tolerated these days, what people have a hard time dealing with, at least in the world I work in is, the small amounts of time you have to get the photo, get it right, and get it out. I can't go back and do anything over.

    People who shoot landscapes, products have all the time in the world, compared to my having seconds to get it. Yet, I see of many of my colleagues miss some easy shots. For the work I do you have to be on guard or you will miss it and that's that, what ever is you miss has passed into history in just seconds, never to be seen again.

    Over my career, I have photographed every professional sport you can imagine Super Bowls, World Series but, figure skating and boxing are the most difficult. I still cover the big fights in Vegas from time to time, sports keep you sharp, any journalistic photography does that, and if I was to do a wedding, for example, you already know what will happen, they are all alike, and for the formal photos you are the director.

    I don't do them often but, at least I admit that I do...ask any journalist and they will snear at you, however, I can guarantee you they have shot them, as well, and are lying about it. They think are above that. I have covered weddings to war zones. Brides can be awful, often, you can deal with people in not so friendly places much easier. My wife always comes with me as my second camera, I like the idea of a woman's perspective at a wedding. Plus she is one of the best boxing photographers I have ever seen.

    I never cared for boxing that much one way or the other, then I got an assignment to cover Oscar De La Hoya,s first professional fight, post Olympic Gold Medal. It was in LA at the... the...I forget the location, and I am not at my office where my field notes are but, after being ringside, I was hooked on boxing. Photography as a journalist opens windows, and draws back the veil of new delights since it exposes you to things and people you would never come across, or events you would never have thought to even bother to attend. I wish I could recommend it as a career but, I can't. I did very well, and made more money than I ever thought I could, (Thank you O.J. and President Clinton), however today, everyone is a photographer.

    The consolation is that, myself, my wife, and my company, and assistants at the time, my lab and its print people are all pioneers, genuine, real pioneers, in a new media that changed the world forever. All of who were film shooters and struggled through the transition, are in the eyes of history, pioneers. We were the ones on the frontlines of making it happen, helping the engineers, and we called in many mistakes to Nikon that their instruction manuals had wrong, other published books too, mostly because of my wife and her huge talent with computers, (I called in the most of the Nikon errors). So many of my colleagues of the day ran from photography when digital replaced film, we embraced it, and it happend so much faster than any of us thought it would. Digital turned out to be a gold mine for those who stuck it out at a high level, yet, there were still plenty of flakes who stayed and had no knowledge of what they were even doing. What great years! At the time it could be frustrating, long hours, dial up modems and several minutes to transmit just one photo! I now look back on all of it as a fantastic experience that few people over the course of history are able to experience. Like the first people to use a printing press.

    Really, even if you had a point and shoot and switched to a digital camera, you are a pioneer, too, just not at the level of figuring it all out, and making it work with clients, editors, deadlines and no one with experience you could call, who had done it before. We were the ones with the experience, and we had to figure it all out, make it work, and remain in business, and by then my company was already working at high levels, major companies and the political elite and power of the world. In many industries none of them, even that they knew this was really foreign to all of us did not accept any excuses, and the wanted the work right then. However everyone, (clients), since the Civil War up to today Needs it NOW!

    For a time, I used to shoot with a film rig and a digital one, Same lenses on both. Thank god that was short lived, as you missed shots, one was either on film or digital. It's just you had to get the shot, one way or the other.

    That's enough, I am now ceased with the sudden fear I have drifted wildly off topic...But, that's the way is was back in the Stone Age. What a time to be a working photographer. May be interesting to some.
    Last edited by RedLED; 03-21-2017 at 01:36 PM.
    Check my Web Site: www.Redwayphoto.com

  6. #36
    *Flashaholic* StarHalo's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Gotta challenge yourself


  7. #37
    Flashaholic* RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Star,

    I have always wanted to get a photo of a hummingbird, and freeze the wings. So far, I have missed out on that even with millions and millions of images.

    Thing is is you were on top of it and captured something not easy to do. So, good job!
    Check my Web Site: www.Redwayphoto.com

  8. #38
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    I've done some paid work but still consider myself very much an amateur. Still so many things to learn.
    My forte is food and a little bit of portraiture. I would not even attempt weddings. I've seen some bad wedding photography even during the event itself. I was wondering what the photographer was doing at times but it wasn't my place to meddle as it was his profession and I was a guest at the wedding and it was his own art, style and technique. Unfortunately, a lot of the wedding photos did come out bad.

    Though I know some guys who stil use Nikon D40s for awesome shoots.

    Quote Originally Posted by SoCalTiger View Post
    I do professional photography part-time. I don't think that phones will ever replace a wedding photographer. Even if a phone was able to take FF DSLR quality pictures, the problem is training first and supplemental gear (lighting primarily) second. Amateurs generally lack the skill set to be able to capture the same quality pictures or really deal with the wedding environment. A large part of being a wedding photographer is, quite frankly, Chaos Management. However, the primary force that is destroying the profession is the massive influx of amateur budget photographers now that DSLRs are so affordable. It's harder and harder for even established photographers to justify a $200-300 price tag on a standard family session (price not even including prints) when there are cut-rate photographers all over the place offering "mini-sessions" for $25-50. Same for all the cheap amateur wedding photographers.
    http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news...910.amp?espv=1
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...rry-shots.html

  9. #39
    *Flashaholic* StarHalo's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Quote Originally Posted by RedLED View Post
    I have always wanted to get a photo of a hummingbird, and freeze the wings.
    Let the flash do the work; Sony RX100 pocket camera and a $70 speedlight (mounted elsewhere as the camera has no hotshoe) :


  10. #40
    Flashaholic* RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    I guess my prime issue is I have not seen a humming bird in this desert in years, and with the amount of feral cats that have been trapped, fixed and ear notched and released back in to our street, it is amazing I had eight of them lounging up here yesterday on all our front patio furniture, so no bird will come around here.

    When reseeding the grass every year, but they act like a kitty seal team against the birds, with air support from all the crows living high above in our palm trees. It does give us the best 10,000 sq ft of grass around. No birds landing to eat my seed! Also, all, the bees, and bats are gone. We used to have hundreds of bats every night flying in all directions and swooping the pool. They are long gone, and I have not heard a coyote in at least a decade, maybe longer. Like 18 years would be more accurate.

    This place has become LA! Without the crime! However, you live somewhere in the inland empire, and you have humming birds.
    .
    Check my Web Site: www.Redwayphoto.com

  11. #41

    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Thanks for the history lesson(s) RED.
    My dad was a big fan of Pentax back in the 70's. Ansell Adams he was not... or so it seemed. He chose the slide medium saying Kodachrome was over rated. We always thought it was because he was too cheap to print stuff. He always showed off vacation pictures on his projector when we were teens. Bring over a date to meet the folks and "oh no, the Canada in 72 pix again". He used manual cameras so when you said "cheese" your jaw was tired by the time he dialed in and took the shot.

    When I reached my 20's and started a family I asked my pop for some tips. Not one to mince words he hands me all kinds of pocket manuals and basic how to books that were a Fort Knox of basic knowledge.

    Well ole pop was miles ahead of the curve. When he passed we kids found a major cache of his personal photos.. no kids, no vacation type stuff but photos of things the old man enjoyed... all in black and white. What I meant by ahead of the curve is that those photos would've been bland in scrap book form. But he had those Pentax rigs so dialed in that when shown on his 4'x4' screen there were some absolute gems. Macro butterflies, moon pix you could see in exquisit detail like the hubble telescope did it, silouettes, old barns... I was in my late 40's before I knew my pop was a photographing master.

    One day I gave him a $45 Canon P&S. He had never seen a digital P&S so I showed him the on/off button and shutter button and told him it's 90% automatic. He took one photo with flash, looked at it on the tiny screen and says "go look in my dresser and bring me one of those white film containers with sharks teeth in it". So I did. He whips out his grandfathers tiny folding knife sharpened so many times like 1/3 of the blade was gone. He cuts the bottom off the film container, slices the side with his razer sharp blade... slides the film container over the flash and takes another photo. WOW!! Suddenly a dim dining room pic all washed out by the ugly flash had nice wood tones with perfect lighting.

    He chuckled and says "this digital camera thing may catch on afterall". Then he hands it back and says "thanks but no thanks".
    The man wrote the programs to turn 1950's machinery at his factory to CNC type accuracy in the 1980's yet did not own a personal computer. So he did not want a digital camera.

    He did really dig the idea of the full frame type sensor on my D700. I showed him how the smaller sensored D7000 I had made for better crops but the bokeh of the full frame was so much easier to predict. He said "phooey on those plastic zoom lenses, go find old glass primes at yard sales". Glad I did.
    One day he hands me his spotting scope and says "hook it to your camera, you'll love it. It was a Kowa TSN-822 spotter with a 10x-50x eyepiece and a tripod with a way to mount your camera too!!!! He'd used it at the shooting range to dial in his powder recipe for his reloads. The wife and I hooked our digi cams to it a few times and took amazing photos of baby hawks fresh from the egg, eagles fornicating, and a host of other subject matter only being in the right place at the right time can produce.

    As a road inspector there are times we make paths through areas the deer and antelope played before the white man arrived. Birds don't pay you no mind if you sit still often enough and long enough. So birds ended up being my favorite subjects on days I got paid to watch grass grow. Sometimes I'd be 3-5' from birds doing bird stuff armed with a nice camera and a lens.

    On one project I shot picks of a gold finch pluck grass stalks one at a time from a field, fly to a tree and build a nest all from like 25' away. Another was a juvenile eagle learning to swoop down and catch fish. Every day the thing would swoop down and belly flop to the water. I took pix 3-4 fps. Then one day... success! And I got pix! I was stoked for the bird , but then later more stoked with the photos. Bird nears water, bird grabs fish, bird flies away fish in claws. But my favorites were baby cows licking adults or doing other hijinx with other youngsters. That was a fun day.

    But later on my favorite subject for work was to go find photos that tell a story. A sweaty fellow wiping his brow, a 75' tall steel cage being lowered into a shaft and guided by a 6' worker, a bridge being demolished catching chips flying off a wrecking ball.... the trick is to get the motion without blur.

    Like you said, you have 1 try and little to no time to prepare. In my case those pocket guides and a couple of decades of practice later I can do ok.

    But I'm picky who I'll shoot for. If the observer says "what is this?" as if to scoff I tell 'em "I don't do Olin Mills mass produced snapshots Bucko!" "When you want good photos ask me nicely and I'll consider it".
    The folks I work for now know my style and send me out to do my thing with a couple of small demands. Win-win.
    Last edited by bykfixer; 03-17-2017 at 05:59 PM.
    John 3:16
    "The only friends I have from France are french fries" -PK

  12. #42
    Flashaholic* RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Fixer,

    That is a great post. Photography is not as hard to do as most people think it is. I have had doctors, lawyers, accountants people who need to have a vast knowledge of their profession, years of formal education, and yet can't take a decent photo or understand how a camera works, which is really very simple. And over the years, I have had so many people like this ask me the same questions again and again, which I always answer, and, again remember there are no secret tricks in photography, skills learned, yes, practice, yes, however, no secrets.

    I am self taught, most of the best working professionals I have met are, I have hired assistants with four year degrees in Photography, with top of the line digital cameras, that get all the photos out of focus, or some other simple mistake, and we can check the settings to see what they had the camera set at, and most have been on auto focus. So, an educated photographer asking to work for us will not even be considered anymore.

    I wish I had the space here to tell you over 25 years of clients stories of complete disasters with photographers they had used in the past. These stories and so funny, yet to the people who hired them it was a nightmare. A vast majority of our business has come come from the incompetent ones before us. And we have held many clients for well over 25 years, in some cases I am the longest person to have been connected to the company or organization but, we are still a vendor. In the corporate world, if they like you they will keep you.

    I can be at a media event with many photographers, and I can tell just by how someone holds their camera if they know what they are doing or not. (Like a golf pro could tell by how someone holds their club). On a trip with president Clinton in 1993, I had show the Associated Press photographer how to attach a monopod to a long lens. No joke, I thought, is this real? For those who may not know, you simply thread it into the lens platform. I found that really unbelievable, first of all, the agency and then of all things, a presidential event, which is really as high as you can go.

    My my school of thought on photography is this:

    Photography is a combination of art and science. To earn a living it is: art+science+business. You must know how to conduct business. Also, how to conduct yourself, and with heavy VIP's to know your place.

    People like your dad make up the best of photographers. I would hire him, or you, let's see...you are by DC?

    Best wishes,

    RL
    Last edited by RedLED; 03-20-2017 at 03:16 AM.
    Check my Web Site: www.Redwayphoto.com

  13. #43

    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Red, you speak of the art, and that is where you have it or you don't. Snap shot or 'photograph'... there's a giant chasm between them that most people holding a camera fail to know even exists, much less sees it.

    For me there is one secret to photography that daunts me these days, yet at once was an easy thing to grasp.

    In my minds eye I see what the camera sees.... edge to edge top to bottom. There was some work involved to get the details correct. Proper settings in other words.
    At one point I was "one with my camera"... pro atheletes refer to it as "being in the zone"..

    There are times I see something, grab the camera and bam! Instant winner, first shot. Lately it became forced.
    At one point I lost that ability... at least the ability to do that every time. So time would be spent trying to crop, edit or alter the photo into a good one. Many times with success, but many times not so. The better my cameras got the harder it seemed to get photos I even like. So I reached a wall of creativity and decided to take some time away from it. This thread has me thinking of trying some studio type stuff with flashlights for my store.

    Now getting back to why PP went under... I don't think it can be blamed on the internet per sae. I think it's like JC Penney or Sears. Once great institutions that now see huge competition from several directions.

    To me it seems they forgot the basics of what made them so viable so long ago while they try to compete with youthful competition on the youthful competitions terms. That's like a 79 year old fella trying to play tennis against 3 chaps who are in their late teens.

    They shoulda sat back and pondered howthehell they reached 79 years old to start with and used those virtues to continue playing the games of 79 year olds... golf, chess, shuffleboard!

    Sears just sold the Craftsman Tools name for cash to buy fashion accessories... bad idea!!
    Last edited by bykfixer; 03-20-2017 at 08:29 AM.
    John 3:16
    "The only friends I have from France are french fries" -PK

  14. #44
    Flashaholic* RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    I think it comes down to the age we live in and they should have seen it coming.

    Millennial's dont read, buy or subscribe to magazines, they have phones for that, and with that go advertising dollars. You need to introduce younger generations into things. Who would have thought kids today don't want cars or even drive? They have Uber for that.

    Golf...the hardest hit as the baby boomers, don't want to play dad's sport and socialize with club members, they have social media for that and golf has a second and worse blow coming as another entire generation will shun the sport. Millennial's won't pick up the sport as they don't have the attention span for a 5 hour game not played on a screen.

    Here in the Palm Springs area where we maintain a home, there over 120 golf courses, and the future for these courses and the communities built around them will be a huge disaster, actually, it already is but the worst is still to come for the sport. As well as, people like us who don't play, yet own a home in a country club.

    A magazine can can just close, what do you with hundreds of thousands of acres of land suited for, and not useable for anything else, with massive costs to maintain and the real killer...the water. And no one who wants to play, except Obama, he will play, but we can't make it on him alone.
    Last edited by RedLED; 03-20-2017 at 11:29 PM.
    Check my Web Site: www.Redwayphoto.com

  15. #45
    *Flashaholic* StarHalo's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Quote Originally Posted by RedLED View Post
    Millennial's dont read, buy or subscribe to magazines, they have phones for that
    Check out PetaPixel, Fstoppers, The Northrups; I'll miss the magazine but I won't miss any news or information..

  16. #46
    Flashaholic* RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    The Internet has wiped out many publications, and newspapers are just hanging on.
    Check my Web Site: www.Redwayphoto.com

  17. #47

    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Red, as the Price is Right fan dies off things are leaving with them.
    Yet like with a film camera or a vinyl album, there are still some fans. The snowflakes with their $125k college debt at 24 aint though. They cannot afford the stuff even if they wanted to. $12/hr jobs and $1500/mth apartments (shared with 3 others) won't allow it.

    I know youngsters who have NEVER watched tv in their home in the apartment laden suburbs... or listened to the radio. But you ask them the top 5 costs they'll cut when times get tight... food is in there, but celphone plans are not.
    Of course those folks aren't going to subscribe to Popular Photography.... in paper?
    Gasp!! The trees, the ink... the carbon foot print for Pete's sake.

    But I know a very successful business man who downsized in 08, down to a core group and paid them out of his pocket. He has managed to cling on by his finger nails by adapting and is now hiring again.

    I do feel honored you say you'd hire my pop (or me)
    John 3:16
    "The only friends I have from France are french fries" -PK

  18. #48
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    A few minutes at any one of those links above will give you more than an issue of PP, especially considering all the advertising required to keep the magazine afloat..

  19. #49

    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    I am a long time reader of Popular Photography. I used to read Modern Photography too. There are many photography blogs online. Popular Photography will be missed. Any smartphone with advanced optics will never replace any digital camera.

  20. #50
    Flashaholic* RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Fixer,

    I'm with you, man... I glad I was young when I was, these kids have no real fun today I went to high school in the 70s and things were just better then. They don't have a concept of genuine fun with your friends.

    Some me people freak out if their phone is in the next room, sometimes I leave the house for errands and things, and forget it at home, and it does not bother me a bit. Infact, sometimes I leave it behind just so I don't have to carry it. I can take an additional light or knife that way. Even with out the extra EDC gear, which I can live without as well, I can make it to Wal-Mart and back just fine, you know like in the old days way back in the 90's!

    The 1990' were actually pretty good!

    There is some very cool and handy these things phones can do like recording the police, wish I had that when I was a teen getting harassed by the California Highway Patrol for riding a Honda Mini Trail, that went 30 miles an hour, while my classmates had hefty bags of dope, and yet they come after me for riding in the middle of nowhere north of Los Angeles, (in those days). I was clean cut, no laws broken but I was their target because they did, and still do hate teens and bikes, and combine the two...forgetaboutit!

    Now, back to the phones... As they do some great things, I don't understand the obsession with not having it with you. Motorcycles were cool, way cooler than any phone, and still are but, to me as a kid, if it rained, or I needed a part, I could find something else to do like read Popular Photography, Popular Mechanics plus I read the news papers every day since I could read, call friends or go over to their house or even watch TV. As much as I would loved to have had the video recording at my disposal, we lived in a better time, a better day. With things they will never experience.

    It's not like that any more. I Still have motorcycles, and I used to fly, however I have kind have semi retired from that, however as much as amazingly spectacular and fun as aviation is, along with the rewards of having the knowledge to land at LAX as a kid, (What young person today will ever do that), it is steeped in rules and regulations, you are often controlled by the San Diego TRACON, except VFR runs but, motorcycles are free, pure freedom. Danger comes with this, but still once you find areas not scrutinized by anyone with a citation book, it is actually more fun than flying, to feel the air, even the risk is exciting. My God, even getting a ticket on a bike is at least something, the kids today miss even that.

    Now they will miss out on some wonderful dedicated publications. There is something about just flipping through a magazine. Anyone start from the back the first time when picking up a new edition? I always have.

    The thing was as I progressed to full size Motocross bikes around 16, and became a local professional in So.Cal, I could never get through to the CHP that I worked to pay for the bike and all it's support operations, never touched alcohol or drugs, as I explained you would kill yourself with the combination, a mixture they knew all to well, and they should be going after the fools and goofs at school who eat entire boxes of Lucky Charms without the milk. Plus all the pothead teachers of the day, with glazed eyes and repeated the same thing over and over as they did not remember we just covered that.

    What at helped me with my sport was reading magazines like Motocross Action, Dirt Bike, Modern Cycle, Popular Cycling and the weekly trade Cycle News. I read every word over, and over, again and even knew the dates they would be on the newsstand. These publications helped educate me on what I was doing. I know Dirt Bike and MXA are still in print, the others long gone, Cycle News is on line now. Yes, they can get all the information they need however, if you don't do anything, what's the use. All they are is obsessed with is sending photos of themselves, doing nothing, to each other. I at least learned how engines functioned, learned how to use tools the right way (Fixer, I still have Craftsman tools from Junior high, over 40 years ago, still use them, too).

    At least the CHP tickets made life interesting, espicially when my parents found out. Funny thing was they were mad at the Cops, not me as I had their permission to ride there.

    And, Infact they, the CHP, had a magazine called Highway Patrol filled with photos of awful car wrecks, with dead people in it. The barber shop always had it and I never missed that one either. Anyone remember the magazine Highway Patrol?

    Those magazines helped me land a job in the MC industry for awhile simply because of the knowledge that came along with each edition. And then years later after being trained by two of the best editors ever, I was able to cover the biggest and best events in Ameraic and the world, then being published in all the major publications worldwide, even many books and my stills on TV.

    So, for myself, I will miss each magazine that goes to bed for the last time (That's a Journalism term by the way), sad to see them go.
    Last edited by RedLED; 03-20-2017 at 11:22 PM.
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  21. #51
    Flashaholic* RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Quote Originally Posted by trstick1 View Post
    I am a long time reader of Popular Photography. I used to read Modern Photography too. There are many photography blogs online. Popular Photography will be missed. Any smartphone with advanced optics will never replace any digital camera.
    Not today, but hang on. Big things are coming.
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  22. #52
    *Flashaholic* StarHalo's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    437 complete issues of Soviet Photo scanned right here.

  23. #53
    Flashaholic* RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Where did you get all of that, comrade?

    Actually, very cool, however your FBI file just got a little thicker. Mine too.

    It it does not have quite the charm of our old magazines. That is the people's photography, not "popular." Typical CCCP doom and gloom.

    The commies had an almost exact copy of the Hasselblad system, only no where as good as the real one since nothing ever worked in the Soviet Union.

    Last yeay Tass bought a POTUS Obama photo of mine from an Asian countries business conference ASEAN. Google: Ned Redway ASEAN 2016 Tass

    Tass is the Rusian News agency a hold over from the USSR. They have a photo of mine of the Cambodian PM, there was an Obama, however I can't locate it anymore.

    Or, Google: Ned Redway ASEAN 2016 then click visit page and my credits are there.

    Or, Google my my name and photos, and you can see me with Chuck Yeager. Most of those photos are mine but not all Google is messed up, you have to click view all and click go to page on the photo, my OJ photo is up there, too. Go to the first one.

    Click view all , then you have to click visit page to see the captions and credits.

    Another one of my favorites is: 707sim.com then find 'Air Force One Pavillion Grand opening,' I inserted my self in that one, too. I was there at 0430 to shoot that, I was the first one to shoot the exhibit, and left with POTUS in The mortacade. They ran a complete dummy motorcade that day, and it was a day I slipped my disc out and the staff wanted to send the President's Dr., over to which I firmly said no, thanks but, NO! Otherwise I would have been news, I just dealt with it with my medication. You can't see the hundreds or maybe a over thousand photos from that day, however people who review my work said it was some of my best, even under feeling like a knife was in my back.

    Back at AF1, at LAX Remote site, POTUS made a point to ask me if I was OK, and I just said I'm fine Mr. President. Thank you! That was nice of him to wave me over to check on me. That was a long time ago.

    I'm OT, but I love the Soviet magazines, again, how did you get these, did you work in the basement at the Americam Embassy in Moscow and take them home in a diplomatic pouch?
    Last edited by RedLED; 03-22-2017 at 05:04 AM.
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  24. #54
    *Flashaholic* StarHalo's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Quote Originally Posted by RedLED View Post
    how did you get these, did you work in the basement at the Americam Embassy in Moscow and take them home in a diplomatic pouch?
    Heck no, I was in junior high when the wall fell. The link came from one of the above photography news sites.

  25. #55
    Flashaholic* RedLED's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Just teasing you. Or did I blow your cover? Still I looked at some, real Soviet style on display.
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  26. #56

    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Quote Originally Posted by RedLED View Post
    Not today, but hang on. Big things are coming.
    Smart phone cameras are pretty impressive today .... compared to where they were in the past, but form factor and physics will always be at play. You need light to get signal to noise ratio. With image stabilization, whether mechanical or digital and motion compensation (digital), you can gather more light using time instead of glass, but that has its practical limits. Personally I am waiting for more use of stereoscopic imaging both for 3D, but also variable depth of field.

    I was recently on a business trip without a "real" camera, just with my cell phone (one of the best rated cameras for cell phones). My colleague had brought his ~10 year old Kodak 10x zoom point and shoot with him. I found myself consistently asking to borrow it to get a shot.

    Some great points on art + science (and business). Most(large majority of) photographers who put food on the table doing photography do it through weddings and portraits. It's a tough business as everyone with a DSLR now thinks they are a photographer. I don't think the "art" is universal though. One of my best friends still charges $5,000+ for weddings and regularly travels the world to shoot them. Her ability to capture the emotion of her subjects is amazing. She also does some amazing street/urban photography and has sold quite a few piece. She would admit without hesitation that beyond the technical ability, she can't take a landscape/nature photo to save her life. It's not her passion either.

    SLR sales are well off their peak. Low end models get updated fairly regularly, but high end modules are now on fairly long update cycles. Technically things have not improved much to justify updates. The best Nikons of today are only marginally better than the ones from 2012 whether you are talking full-frame or APS-C. Some improvements have been made in in camera noise reduction (digital), but memory is cheap so just shoot in raw and use the best noise algorithms off camera that are not encumbered by time or power (when needed).

    Interest in photos is at an all time high. I would even say the interest in the art (to a degree) is at an all time high. Unlike the past where you had one chance to get it right .... and may not know till a plane ride and a month later whether you got it right or not, you just take another picture. Sure that's not always possible, but most of the time it is ... and when its not, another opportunity will present itself again.

  27. #57
    *Flashaholic* StarHalo's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Quote Originally Posted by ssanasisredna View Post
    Smart phone cameras are pretty impressive today .... compared to where they were in the past, but form factor and physics will always be at play.

    SLR sales are well off their peak.
    Just my observation, but the cell phone usually does the kind of pictures done by cell phones better than the camera in auto mode; the phone's minuscule aperture and raised-shadows processing makes for remarkably optimized selfies and indoor shots. And since you're sharing an image that won't be viewed on anything larger than a cell phone, the amount of detail is about right for the format.

    And SLR sales have shown very slow and modest gains since the digital camera took over, and haven't really been affected by the cell phone, whereas the compact camera has been completely destroyed by the phone; compact sales figures today are about on par with the sales of film cameras in their final year. The notable trend within the SLR category this year is that mirrorless is rising and DSLR is declining.

    A very succinct video about the current state of the camera market and how the cell phone ran over the consumer camera, i.e. why Popular Photography died:

    Last edited by StarHalo; 03-24-2017 at 07:01 PM.

  28. #58
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Star,

    I agree with you on this100%.

    And no professional, I have ever known at the highest levels ever uses RAW, RGB is perfectly fine, let the camera do the work for you. At the Oscars or Emmys, I shoot 8,000 images, with dead lines, RGB is the way to go, and my post production artist will tell me to do a few only if we are going big in size, light room and its BS aside. I don't like light room, mt artist may, I use something else simpler that I won't a discuss here.

    On the D1 series yes, after that forget it. No editor wants to deal with that. If anyone even remembers the D1, the total game changer camera in digital photography for professionals. But, it came with huge color issues. However, that is now coming up on almost two decades we have Several D4s and 5s, we have 5-6 each of these models, as I have one other shooter and we always go out with no less than three cameras but my favorite was the D2X and D3, which we had to get rid of due to use, if you can get one of them, you will have a great camera as not many important developments have come fourth, and I hate any DSLR with video, as I refuse to shoot it, even if the the President of the United States asked me to, I would not. I'm am a still photographer, even though I can shoot motion picture cameras and have DP credits.
    Check my Web Site: www.Redwayphoto.com

  29. #59

    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    I almost bought the D2x when the 3 arrived but chose the 700 instead as the 1:1 thing wasn't high on my list of things required. As time has passed it no longer seems like something I'm interested in as I was able to probe deep, deep, deep into the menu of my D7000 and tweak it to tailor the sensor to interpolate what I see pretty well color-wise. And being a hobbyist that was good enough.

    Now regarding PP, if 12 year olds are dictating the industry, it's a sad commentary for things to come. Sure at 12 I was able to say to my dad "maybe this would be easier" as to a 12 year old convenience is king. But as a grown up I have learned that if you rely on things automatic you really limit yourself to what is possible.
    I commented to a snowflake at work one day "dude if you had your way somebody in the government would pick out your attire". He remarked "yeah and it would probably be pretty comfy too". Later in the day I pointed to a postal worker and said "pretty comfy, huh?"... He understood my point but failed to understand that the freedom to learn what makes things tick is why America is so great and that when some bloated software giant decides how quickly automatic doors open you are limited in exposure to what could be limitless opportunities.

    My brother, a first on the block with all things gadgets uses bluetooth memory cards in his P&S, and not satisfied with his craft sought out a digi-cam. Once he did that for a while he now uses my old D80 and looks at life through a new set of eyes. He remarked "this is like getting prescription glasses for my photography."

    Frankly I'm glad the market is killing off those mini SLR's and all those little rigs. It is phasing out all those would-be Ansel Adams wanna be types and sending them over to Instagram. That leaves me a lot of elbow room to take proper photographs and keep them on my dinasaur laptop.

    I don't set in some utopian bubble pretending the world isn't changing around me. I see it in movies, hear it at work and everywhere else I go. Quite often my kids show off this and that to which I marvel. But I sit back in the comfy bubble as an observer knowing the classics never go out of style.... fashion dictates they come back every so often. And when some new fangled version comes along I just chuckle knowing the history of it. Also knowing at some point the 12 year old will be an adult and ask "how'd you do that?"...

    People like to say "the dinasaur is extinct"... I respond "tell that to the alligator".

    At my work I'm tasked with teaching the next generation how to do my job. Part of that was to learn all things Office 010. So they really helped this field guy in that regard. And they still chuckle at my exuberance when I learned our copiers punch holes and staple things as they spit out the chute. Yet at the close of this week my final booklet was printed as a draft and passed around for a few to proof read. The youngsters gathered round to see what the dinasaur had come up with and were at points seeking my advice on how I did certain creative aspects that were way beyond just clicking and pasting onto a screen but were a combination of things available that when mingled together created unique effects.

    Learning the basics of the combustable engine, the film camera, the computer operating system and a host of other modern day creature features led to a distinct process that all these auto-gizmos of today fail to provide a generation of up n comers who will fall into an obscurity of same-ole-sameness if the dinasaur doesn't pass on those old skills. The crowd that seeks more is shrinking for sure. But as long as folks like that guy in the video keep touting more automation because it's popular, the more the crowd will shrink into a day when they.... are the dinasaur not the crocodile.
    Last edited by bykfixer; 03-25-2017 at 07:48 AM.
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  30. #60
    Flashaholic joelbnyc's Avatar
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    Default Re: RIP Popular Photography

    Quote Originally Posted by RedLED View Post
    $15,000?... My 600f4 cost that, try having a million dollar investment over 27 years In top level studio with the latest gear, and software. Plus the talent to assist. Not easy anymore.

    I wanted to come back and say, I think it is great your wife did so well out of the gate, and if she keeps it up, you could do very well down the road. Nice to hear a success in the business these days, congratulations.

    Best,

    NR
    Yes, I know that there are medium and large format digital cameras and lenses that cost tens and hundreds of thousands of dollars... we have family friends who are in the NYC and global fashion world.

    In any case, I use to be a hobbyist with 35mm black and white film and darkroom in school in the 90s, and I am blown away by what a D750 can do. I really didn't think my wife would book, I got her the equipment (and a few books like Jose Villa's Fine Art Wedding Photography, technical reading, online classes, etc) so she could pursue her "passion," but she turns out to be talented, handy with the software, obsessive, and already booking 5K weddings her second season. She is of course well aware of the huge gap between her current skill set and a true master- she's done some lab assisting and second shooting for established pros that showed her how much she has to learn. What did Malcolm Gladwell say, that it takes 10,000 hours to master something? Arbitrary figure maybe, but grain of truth there.

    The preponderance of amateurs with crop frame DSLRs perpetuating a race to the bottom for what most photographers can earn is a definite thing, but the wealth divide is such that there will be a set of people wanting the 15K weddings and high quality professional work, at least in certain locales, regardless of continual improvement in consumer and "prosumer" equipment. If the wedding costs 1 million, the groom earned a 7 or 8 figure bonus last year, what's 15 or 30K for the photographer?

    Thanks for the reply. Sounds like you have had an impressive and fulfilling career!
    Last edited by joelbnyc; 03-25-2017 at 11:32 AM.

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