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Thread: REVIEW: Nitecore SRT7GT Flashlight

  1. #1

    Default REVIEW: Nitecore SRT7GT Flashlight

    [Submitted as a REVIEW]


    Introduction

    This light was provided by Nitecore Store for review and was shipped from their location in Texas (USA).

    The SRT7GT is the newest model in the SmartRing Tactical line. It is the same size as the current SRT7 model but uses a XP-L HI V3 emitter instead of XM-L2 and adds an ultraviolet emitter to the green, red, and blue emitters found in both. The side indicator is now blue rather than red. It also advertises a higher 1000 lumen peak output.

    Here are the key review details in one table for the TL;DR folks:




    Packaging

    The SRT7GT arrived in a retail box within a padded envelope. The look and feel of the box will be familiar to those with other recent Nitecore flashlights; the same design and materials are used for the SRT7GT’s packaging as with most other SRT and E series lights.


    The front advertises the XP-L HI V3 LED, the 450 meter beam length, the 1000 lumen output, the ring used to switch modes, the 4 other LEDs (UV, red, green, blue), and the 5 year warranty.


    The back of the box has extensive verbiage discussing the 3rd generation Smart Selector Ring that allows for infinite brightness adjustment. The box describes the hazard (police strobe) mode that alternates between red and blue flashes (intended for emergencies and law enforcement) and it explains that this GT model has “grand throw” features.


    The left side of the box is plain with a few words dedicated to the Smart Selector Ring and throw.


    The right side of the box shows Tactical and Law Enforcement as the intended uses for the SRT7GT. It also shows the key specifications.



    The bottom has the product barcode and description.



    Design

    The SRT7GT joins the SRT3, SRT5, SRT6, and SRT7 in Nitecore’s SRT series. It is the same size and shape as the SRT7, taking the title as largest in the series with head width of 40 mm and length of 162 mm. The SRT6 has a 34 mm head while the SRT3 and SRT5 both have 25.4 mm heads.

    40 mm is a common size for Nitecore; the TM03, P25, EC4, EA41, and other lights share this specification so compatible diffusers, traffic wands, remote switches, and other accessories are already available for the SRT7GT.

    The 1 inch barrel is compatible with many bicycle and rifle mounts. Nitecore does offer a remote switch.

    I measured the overall length at 6 3/8 in. and head diameter at 1 9/16 in. Weight was tested without battery at 174 g / 6.15 oz.


    Opening the box, we find the SRT7GT in a plastic carrier with the accessories underneath.


    Included is a holster, manual, warranty card, spare o-rings, spare switch boot, lanyard, cigar ring, and pocket clip.


    The manual is in 8 languages (English, Spanish, German, French, Polish, Japanese, Romanian, and Chinese); each language’s section is brief but sufficient.


    The body of the light has two small flat ovals in the middle of the body tube. One has the model name “SRT7GT” in larger letters with smaller “SmartRing Tactical” and CE and RoHS designations. It also has a “do not dispose in trash” image. The diamond-pattern knurling is in blocks rather than being solid all the way around the barrel; these blocks add more grip than solid knurling alone does.


    The other side has the NITECORE name and website.


    Embossing was consistent and clear on both sides. While good overall, the edges of the letters were not the sharpest I’ve seen.


    The head of the light has a flat stainless bezel – flat both in color and shape. There are 5 machined indentations around the inside of the bezel. When placed head down when on, no light can escape. Users will want to take care not accidentally deplete the battery by leaving the light on when setting it down.


    The glass is AR-coated mineral glass.

    The reflector is of the smooth variety. The picture below appears to exaggerate it slightly, but there are extremely fine lines in the reflector.

    The Red, Green, Blue, and UV emitters are inset into the main reflector. The edges of these bored wells are not as precise as I’d like to see. There was also one very small imperfection in the reflector from what appears to be a piece of dust or debris; it is visible here between the two top wells. The main XP-L HI emitter is perfectly centered.


    The side of the head has some machined notches around the rear. I found these to be useful for grip when carrying the SRT7GT; my thumb and forefinger tend to rest on these when not changing modes.


    That ring switch - the signature feature of the SRT series - has good knurling and several notches in it as well. Those notches alternate in size, large-small-large-small. Behind the magnetic ring is a 6 sided nut that keeps the ring in place. There was one extremely small spot where the anodization on this nut was missing. (The rest of the light’s HA was flawless.)


    About two-thirds of the way down the head, above the magnetic ring, is the small blue power indicator light. When the tail switch is on and the ring switch is on standby, the side indicator will blink every 2 seconds to indicate that the tail switch is on. This draws a small amount of power so the tail switch should be off for long term storage. The blinking indicator does make it easier to find the SRT7GT in the dark, though.

    The indicator will also blink every 2 seconds when the light is operating if battery level is under 50%. When the battery is getting very low – around 10% - the indicator light will flash rapidly.


    The tail has a forward clicky switch that enables momentary on; if the ring has been left in an “on” position and the tail switch is half-pressed, the light will turn on. The switch boot has a “N” in the pattern. Pressure required to activate the switch is on the firm side of moderate.


    The tail has two large U-shape cutouts to allow easy access to the button; the extended sections allow tailstanding and the attachment of the lanyard. Given the length of the lanyard attachment slots, I wish Nitecore had gone with a dual hole design that would allow the lanyard cord to sit to the side instead of under the tail.


    The SRT7GT disassembles into 3 sections – head, body tube, and tail.


    As with many other Nitecore lights, button top batteries are required. In the SRT7GT, this is mandated using a unique setup featuring a flat plate on top of the positive-end battery spring. The flat plastic plate has Nitecore branding. The spring is gold colored.


    The tail spring is also gold colored and is actually two springs – an inner and outer spring. This dual-spring design helps maximize current delivery. The switch can be serviced (for cleaning or boot swaps) from inside the tail cap.


    The body tube has wide square cut threads on the head end, free of anodization.



    The tail end threads are anodized and triangle cut. Threads were clean and very well lubricated on both ends. The anodization allows the light to be locked out with a partial turn of the tailcap.


    Both ends have o-rings for water ingress protection and Nitecore presents the light as having IPX-8 water resistance to 2 meters underwater. The SRT7GT is also impact resistant to 1.5 meters.

    The SRT7GT can be configured a variety of ways. Shown above was the “bare” light.

    The plastic cigar ring can be added between the body tube and tail switch. It has a lanyard attachment hole.


    The pocket clip can face either direction and can attach in one of two locations. Nitecore describes the clip as titanium-coated stainless steel.




    The holster is good quality and can be used a variety of ways with a D ring, belt loop, and hook-and-loop strap.


    The holster fits the SRT7GT well, with or without the cigar ring on the light. It is open on the bottom. This picture captured the side LED illuminated.



    Performance

    The deep, smooth reflector produces a tight hotspot and a fairly bright corona. The spill useful, though messy at the periphery at shorter distances due to the bezel’s indentations and reflective tendencies.


    The wells for the auxiliary LEDs don’t seem to negatively impact the beam quality.


    The color of the beam varies from hotspot to spill. The hotspot is a neutral white light. Around the hotspot, the color could be described as “creamy” with a little bit of yellow. Further out, though, the color is cool with some visible blues.


    To demonstrate the color balance, here is the SRT7GT alongside lights with emitters of various temps. (L to R: Nitecore EC4SW with MT-G2, Nitecore TM03 with XHP70, SRT7GT with XP-L HI, and ThorFire C8S with XM-L2.)
    As you can see, the SRT7GT’s beam color isn’t as creamy or yellow as the EC4SW or as cool as the C8S or TM03. This image also demonstrates how the SRT7GT’s spill is a different color than the hotspot.


    Nitecore rates the SRT7GT at 1000 lumens (using the main white XP-L HI V3 emitter). I was unable to reproduce these numbers despite multiple tests with various batteries.

    The Nitecore 3400mAh protected battery I tested with (<10 cycles total life, charged to 4.2V then rested) produced only 843 lumens. An Olight brand 3200mAh protected Panasonic NCR18650BE produced 845 lumens. An unprotected 3200mAh Panasonic NCR18650B produced 850 lumens, which is what I reported in the summary table above as the Turbo output.

    On the hunt for the missing 150 lumens but constrained by button top cells, I tried the special high-drain IMR18650 out of the TM03. It did not produce any more lumens than the other batteries. And the same goes for a Keeppower 3500mAh battery I tried a few days later.

    [Edit 5/2/17: Tenergy CR123A primaries produced 825 lumens, while Fenix 700mAh RCR123s produced 843 lumens.]

    It’s disappointing when a light falls short of advertised specifications by 15% as this is more than Cree’s own +/- 7% tolerance, though the difference is hardly noticeable in person unless sampling 850 lumen and 1000 lumen lights side-by-side.


    Nitecore states that Turbo should run for 1 hour and 15 minutes (1:15) using Nitecore’s Advanced Thermal Regulation (ATR) technology to step down where necessary.

    I tested the runtime using a Nitecore 3400mAh battery, since that’s what was listed as the battery used in the official runtime rating. I had an 80mm PC fan running about 50% to produce a little bit of airflow. Ambient temp was 72F.

    The output dropped about 30 lumens from turn-on to the 1 minute mark and then began a gradual decline. It was down to 769 lumens at 15 minutes when it started to bounce back. I’m not sure if it was the battery getting warmer or the ATR allowing the light to pull more current again – but from minute 15 to 25, it climbed back up to 797 lumens. From there, it began a gradual decline that would continue until the light was dead.

    Output was down to 50% at minute 89 (1:29). ANSI runtime is based on 10% of initial output and was reached at minute 121 (2:01). That’s much longer than Nitecore’s 1:15 specification. It then continued running for another 41 minutes, dropping down as low as 1 lumen before protection kicked in and turned the light off.


    I did not record at what point the low battery indicator started flashing, but it did indeed flash when the battery was getting low and nearly depleted.

    [Edit 5/2/17: As CelticCross pointed out in the comments to this review, the SRT7GT's battery indicator only works correctly when using an 18650 battery. Fresh CR123A primaries caused the SRT7GT to flash at a moderate pace - the same blink pattern as when an 18650 is half used. Fresh RCR123s produced a rapid blink - the same blink rate as when an 18650 is nearly completely used.
    For users who use primaries or 2 cells, this will be a problem. Those who use 18650s will not see any issues.]


    The light never got too hot, reaching a peak surface temperature of 121F on the head just above the magnetic switch ring. The body tube was 114F and the tail was 110F.


    Being infinitely variable, Turbo and Ultralow are the only levels that are defined and listed in the specifications.

    Nitecore rates the Ultralow mode at 0.1 lumens – which is exactly what I found in my testing. No runtime test was conducted; Nitecore rates it at 240 hours using a 3400mAh 18650 battery.


    I tested beam distance at 5.91 meters and the resulting candela was 43451 - equivalent to 417 meters of throw. This is slightly less than the 450 meters that Nitecore rates the SRT7GT at but within a reasonable margin.

    I detected no PWM visually or by camera on either High or Low modes. I do not believe the SRT7GT uses PWM; if it does, the PWM is extremely fast modulation.



    My testing rig has not been calibrated for other colors – so consider and discount these numbers appropriately…

    Nitecore rates Red at 13 lumens; 10 were registered in my test box.

    Green is rated at 19 lumens; I tested it at 20 lumens.

    Both red and green therefore matched rated values relatively closely. Blue was a very different story. Nitecore rates Blue at 3 lumens; it registered 56 lumens when I tested it. As I said above, I have no calibration in place for blue – but when I tested the light outdoors, the blue was indeed brighter than 3 lumens. (See Outdoor Beamshots section for illustrative pictures.)

    UV was not tested.

    The Police Warning strobe works by alternating red and blue flashes. Red always begins, flashing very quickly over the course of about 7/10ths of a second. Blue then flashes quickly and repeatedly for the same period of time before red restarts. This is surely designed for Law Enforcement Officers, since impersonating a police offer (which is what this would do in civilian hands) is illegal.



    Outdoor Beamshots

    All photos taken with a Canon SD4000IS camera. 1/4" exposure, ISO1600, Daylight white balance. The night was clear.

    White deck railing in lower part of picture is at 15 ft. away and the white fence in the distance is 75 ft. out. Pictures match what I observed with my eyes pretty closely except for the green, which appeared brighter in person.

    Control shot:


    Turbo


    Red


    Green appeared brighter than the camera captured.


    Blue appeared brightest of the 3 colors.



    [Edit 5/2/2017: The colored emitters produce an uneven beam due to how they sit near the outer edge of the reflector. Because of this, the rotation that the light is oriented in will affect how the light travels outward. The shots above were done without rotating the light in hand. I'm adding these additional pictures to show the beams with the light rotated so the hotspots are in similar spots.

    Control


    Red


    Green


    Blue

    end EDIT]


    Interface

    The SRT7GT’s tail switch is used as the primary on/off switch. If off, the light will not function no matter what position the selector ring is set to. If the ring is on any mode, it will startup in that mode when the tail switch is activated. There is a very small delay when turning on, a “fade in” of sorts.

    The center position on the selector ring is standby. In this mode with the tail switch on, the side indicator will flash every 2 seconds.

    While holding the light, turning the ring clockwise from Standby will smoothly progress from Ultralow to Turbo. Turbo is reached with a click and a “notch” felt in hand. Turning the ring further clockwise reaches Strobe. Again, a click is heard and the position is felt in hand.

    Turning counterclockwise (anticlockwise) from Standby, the first position reached is UV. Then is Red, Green, Blue, Police strobe, and Beacon in that order.

    Total rotation from Beacon to Strobe is about 355 degrees – nearly one full rotation. There is no marking on the ring that identifies the Standby position alignment.



    Commentary

    The SRT7GT packs a ton of features. Eight (8) modes and infinitely variable brightness controlled with a single magnetic selector ring is pretty slick.

    The light feels good in hand and it comes with every possible way to carry it. Lanyard, reversible pocket clip, holster, with or without cigar ring, there’s nothing missing. It is most comfortable for me to use with just the lanyard (no cigar ring or pocket clip).

    The flat-dome XP-L HI LED and smooth reflector give the light an impressive amount of reach. The throw-oriented focus of the SRT7GT also hides the missing lumens to some degree, though seeing 850 lumens when rated at 1000 is annoying if not disappointing.

    My biggest qualm with the SRT7GT is actually with the placement of the UV setting. I like to leave the ring set to Standby; the first click to the right is white light while the first click to the left is UV. Multiple times I’ve accidentally turned to the left instead of right, thought “why don’t I see light?”, looked down into the head of the light… and realized it was on UV as I felt the pain in my eyes. While this story does throw my intellect into question, I’m sure others will do the same to some extent, too. I would have much preferred it if Nitecore had put the UV past the other colors on the dial rather than leading with it from Standby. Similarly, my preference would be to move Strobe from the far right end of the dial to the left, placing it with the Police Strobe and Beacon settings. Having Beacon and Strobe at opposite ends doesn’t make that much sense to me.

    Both of these are nitpicks; overall I find the number of features packed into the light pretty impressive. I don’t know any other lights that have this much throw plus red, green, blue, and UV LEDs. The Police Warning strobe will also be particularly useful for LEOs. [Edit 5/2/2017: Those who use primaries or RCR123s should be advised the battery indicator only works correctly when using 18650s.]

    Nitecore backs the SRT7GT with a 5 year warranty. It can be purchased here at NitecoreStore.com.



    Meter: Dr. Meter LX1330B
    Integrating "sphere": Homebuilt tube-style device calibrated on other known lights and test results. Numbers should be considered relative to each other and my other review figures but absolute accuracy is not guaranteed.

    Last edited by Bdm82; 05-02-2017 at 11:06 PM. Reason: Updating to include findings on 2 cell voltage indicator

  2. #2
    *Flashaholic* Offgridled's Avatar
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    Default Re: REVIEW: Nitecore SRT7GT Flashlight

    Excellent review.

  3. #3

    Default Re: REVIEW: Nitecore SRT7GT Flashlight

    Thank you for the informative review BDM82.

    And especially for stating that your test unit could only manage 800+ lumens.

  4. #4

    Default Re: REVIEW: Nitecore SRT7GT Flashlight

    Hi there BDM82,

    I have just received my SRT7GT. Have tested it.
    I think, in my opinion (not measured) it is bright and I think my SRT7GT and MH27UV both could have pumped out 1000 lumens or more (or at least I would like to think so... LOL , i do not have a light meter). Tested on a 1 hour night walk with AWT Red flat top 3000 mah batteries with Neodynium spacer magnets.

    Thanks again BDM82, keep the reviews coming.

  5. #5

    Default Re: REVIEW: Nitecore SRT7GT Flashlight

    Quote Originally Posted by proceed5 View Post
    Hi there BDM82,

    I have just received my SRT7GT. Have tested it.
    I think, in my opinion (not measured) it is bright and I think my SRT7GT and MH27UV both could have pumped out 1000 lumens or more (or at least I would like to think so... LOL , i do not have a light meter). Tested on a 1 hour night walk with AWT Red flat top 3000 mah batteries with Neodynium spacer magnets.

    Thanks again BDM82, keep the reviews coming.
    Thanks for the props and glad to hear you're happy with your purchase!

    I noted in my review that the light has a lot of power and the throwy beam makes the lumen difference not as noticable. It is not really THAT much anyway, 150 lumens, but it's my obligation to report what I get.

    Who knows, maybe another sample would test higher and mine is an outlier. I'm waiting to see other reviews.

    I really like to be sure before reporting out of whack numbers, though, so that's why I did so many tests and then retested against other 1000~ lumen lights to validate, including specific lights tested by others on here. I also tested cr113a and rcr113 batteries; the rcrs added about 20 Lm but that's not material (EDIT: and on a 2nd check of my numbers and math, did not actually add that.).

    At the end of the day if someone is looking for this kind of multipurpose light, I doubt it will be a total deal breaker anyway.
    Last edited by Bdm82; 05-02-2017 at 09:12 PM.

  6. #6
    Flashaholic* CelticCross74's Avatar
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    Default Re: REVIEW: Nitecore SRT7GT Flashlight

    Thanks for the review BDM82!! Hey we have the same initials lol! I got this light as soon as it went on sale. I have not been this let down by a Nitecore light since back when I got a first gen P12. It has been 5 years since the release of the SRT line and it has needed an overhaul for a long time. I still have the original SRT7. I can rant about the faults with that but can say that after all the years I have had it everything still works.

    Now the faults with this "upgrade" SRT7GT. You are correct about the light not meeting max output claims. Having read a couple other reviews across the light forums they are getting roughly the same max output you are. My copy came with the XP-L HI emitter a solid 2mm off center. NC advertises the GT as coming with a metal grip ring. Its actually plastic. I can say though that this time the grip ring actually screws tightly down into place unlike the grip ring on the original SRT7 which just spun freely.

    The SRT7GT still has the "CR123 problem" which after all this time there is no excuse for it. What is the "CR123 problem"? The light can take 2x 3v CR123's BUT the voltage sensor in the light is a faulty design. Try inserting 2xCR123's fresh out of the package. As soon as you turn the light on the low voltage LED in the head of the light flashes as fast as it can as the design flaw in the voltage sensor for some reason only reads 3v instead of 6v. This is also a problem for the SRT6. RCR123's and 18350's do not cause this thus I use 2xAW 800mah 18350's in my SRT6 and both SRT7's. You also get a healthy increase in max output on 2xRCR/18350 sources. Why? I do not know but in the original SRT7 max output goes from 780 actual OTF lumens to 840+.

    To my eyes the colored emitters are still just as dim and useless as on the original. I like the UV feature though as it is great for checking for security features on print money. I also wonder why on earth there is roughly 4mm of turning radius between the secondary emitter settings. Nothing happens during this unnecessary extra ring travel. The colors dont increase or decrease why not just click to click? The police strobe. I still wonder why on earth it is still there. It is to dim to help you out as an emergency signal and is more of a party gimmick that can and will get you in trouble with the law if they see it. A much more useful feature should be in its place.

    NC claims 50,900k CD. Just as you found out for yourself that is just not the case. I would have returned the GT for a refund but I am just a sucker for the nice fat chunky metal control ring that and even though it does not meet max output claims it still puts out more at max than the original. The 4 secondary emitter wells in the kinda roughly finished reflector cause the outer edge of the beam profile to be blurry to a point.

    Despite not having the awesome UI ring I feel the MH27 is the better light. NC really dropped the ball with this new GT. If this weak approach to upgrading the SRT line is how they are going to proceed then NC lights loses a few steps against the competition. I like my SRT6 better anyways. No near useless colored emitters, useless cop strobe to turn through. I also believe that both the SRT6 and original SRT7 aside from the 7's secondary emitters have the same driver and same output. Putting 2x AW 800mah 18350's in my SRT6 resulted in a pretty clear and obvious max output increase as well.

    When it comes to a medium sized thrower with colored secondary emitters the Fenix 2016 TK32 eats the new GT alive. The TK32 may only have red and green secondary emitters but they are the brightest red and green secondaries I have ever seen. They even have good profiles to them to boot. The TK32 has the same throw range as the GT at 44-45k CD but independent testing across the forums have proven the new TK32 to actually put out a few more lumens MORE than advertised at max. Sure TK32 only has 4 main output settings but they all meet or beat spec claims.

    EDIT TO ADD-OH NO! The new GT's low voltage sensor now also malfunctions on 2x18350's!! They work great in my original SRT6 and 7 but in the new GT as soon as I turn it on with freshly charged 18350's the low voltage light in the head flashes at full pace just like on 2xCR123's. I will do a bit more experimenting but this one is going back to Nitecore Store for a refund. So now the voltage sensor is even more faulty than the original. Way to go NC.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: REVIEW: Nitecore SRT7GT Flashlight

    Quote Originally Posted by CelticCross74 View Post
    The police strobe. I still wonder why on earth it is still there. It is to dim to help you out as an emergency signal and is more of a party gimmick that can and will get you in trouble with the law if they see it. A much more useful feature should be in its place.
    Ya I wonder about it. Has any law enforcement officer actually used it, anywhere, ever? I doubt it. What exactly is the design intent? it's not nearly bright enough for anything. What would he do, walk up to someone and strobe them in the face telling them they're under arrest? The problem with Nitecore and all these companies it seems, is that design-wise they do a lot of really stupid random stuff that makes no sense. It's sort of like all those random ridiculous junk products you see on the chinese discount stores (banggood etc.) - tho some of that is actually useful even if incredibly low-quality.

    Anyway, two more SRT7 problems that I would assume are the same in new GT. Standby drain is bad - haven't measured exactly but it's just a few days and the battery is dead. This is a problem because you can easily forget to turn off the tailcap switch. Secondly, partly related, is the indicator LED on the side of the head is completely useless. It isn't bright, nor visible from any useful angles. What good is it then and why the hell would they not improve it in the new version? One simple solution would be to have 3 of them around the head with properly designed diffuser so they're seen from all angles. But they're not interested in making actual usable, smartly designed stuff; rather stuff that looks good in pictures on a website. At least they're good quality though.

  8. #8

    Default Re: REVIEW: Nitecore SRT7GT Flashlight

    Quote Originally Posted by CelticCross74 View Post
    Thanks for the review BDM82!! Hey we have the same initials lol!
    [...]
    To my eyes the colored emitters are still just as dim and useless as on the original. I like the UV feature though as it is great for checking for security features on print money. I also wonder why on earth there is roughly 4mm of turning radius between the secondary emitter settings. Nothing happens during this unnecessary extra ring travel. The colors dont increase or decrease why not just click to click? The police strobe. I still wonder why on earth it is still there. It is to dim to help you out as an emergency signal and is more of a party gimmick that can and will get you in trouble with the law if they see it. A much more useful feature should be in its place.
    [...]
    EDIT TO ADD-OH NO! The new GT's low voltage sensor now also malfunctions on 2x18350's!! They work great in my original SRT6 and 7 but in the new GT as soon as I turn it on with freshly charged 18350's the low voltage light in the head flashes at full pace just like on 2xCR123's. I will do a bit more experimenting but this one is going back to Nitecore Store for a refund. So now the voltage sensor is even more faulty than the original. Way to go NC.
    Thanks for the feedback, and congrats on the most excellent initials! :-)

    The CR123/RCR123 problem is one that I hadn't tested for until you posted these comments. I tested and confirmed your results. I am updating the review and making a note that you drew attention to it. Fresh RCR123s immediately did the fast blink (<10% or so warning on 18650), while myCR123A primaries produced the moderate blink (same as around <50% on 18650). I don't know why someone would use 18350s or 16340s/RCR123s instead of an 18650 (except in a real pinch) given no output advantage yet half the capacity... but users who rely on primaries will be let down. by the power indicator's problem with 2 cells.

    As to the colored emitters... This is just my own commentary, but I don't think there's any such thing as the perfect brightness for everyone. For my use, I like red at <3 lumen to preserve night vision at close range. I've used a light that focuses red at a hotspot that easily hits 100'+; useful to others but not me. This one's red is too bright for close range and most indoor use, but floody and useful up to about 40'. It's all a matter of perspective and need/use.



    Quote Originally Posted by Beckler View Post
    Ya I wonder about it. Has any law enforcement officer actually used it, anywhere, ever? I doubt it. What exactly is the design intent? it's not nearly bright enough for anything.
    [...]
    Anyway, two more SRT7 problems that I would assume are the same in new GT. Standby drain is bad - haven't measured exactly but it's just a few days and the battery is dead. This is a problem because you can easily forget to turn off the tailcap switch. [...]
    I waited to reply, hopeful a LEO would weigh in. I agree, this isn't a "pull another car over" brightness. But it is a "Hey, I'm here" brightness. Maybe useful for crowd control, announcing presence at an accident or when directing traffic, etc... that's the kind of thing I thought of when testing this light.

  9. #9

    Default Re: REVIEW: Nitecore SRT7GT Flashlight

    The threading is coarsely made, and the same thing with holes for colored LEDs in the reflector. But for the smartring I'm ready to forgive everything

  10. #10

    Default Re: REVIEW: Nitecore SRT7GT Flashlight

    I encourage to read my reviews in Polish language
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jsDzm2T2-jI

    And translated by google
    https://translate.google.pl/translat...-text=&act=url

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