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Thread: 2014 Fusion H11 to H9 Conversion

  1. #1

    Default 2014 Fusion H11 to H9 Conversion

    Hi,
    I've been lurking for a while and decided to register as in my research I have discovered that some cars have headlights which are suitable for a H11 to H9 conversion, while others are not. I wanted to seek advice on whether or not my 2014 Fusion is an appropriate canidate for this conversion. It has projector headlights, so I would think so but I want to air on the side of being cautious. These are the H9 bulbs I was planning on buying, unless someone has something better to suggest.
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003YMPN3A
    Also, it was my understanding that H9 bulbs have a slightly higher kelvin rating than H11, but these Philips seem to be rated at 3000k. Are there any bulbs with a kelvin rating slightly higher than that (maybe around 3400k) without being tinted/coated?
    Thanks
    Last edited by Alaric Darconville; 12-12-2017 at 11:08 AM. Reason: De-tokenized Amazon URL

  2. #2
    Moderator Alaric Darconville's Avatar
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    Default Re: 2014 Fusion H11 to H9 Conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by Yoyomah20 View Post
    Hi,
    I've been lurking for a while and decided to register as in my research I have discovered that some cars have headlights which are suitable for a H11 to H9 conversion, while others are not. I wanted to seek advice on whether or not my 2014 Fusion is an appropriate canidate for this conversion. It has projector headlights, so I would think so but I want to air on the side of being cautious.

    I don't blame you wanting to err on the side of caution-- typically a projector lamp will do better with the H9 than a reflector lamp, but optical concerns aren't the only issue-- the H9 produces more heat and can be problematic for wiring and the lamp materials. I don't have the data to advise with certainty that you'll be OK to proceed.

    These are the H9 bulbs I was planning on buying, unless someone has something better to suggest.
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003YMPN3A
    Those will be good (so long as the upgrade is permissible. -Virgil- may be along soon with that data).
    You could always do a voltage drop test to see if the wiring is really up to the task at least, but there are still other materials in the lamp that could be damaged. And there's still a potential for excessive glare.

    Also, it was my understanding that H9 bulbs have a slightly higher kelvin rating than H11, but these Philips seem to be rated at 3000k. Are there any bulbs with a kelvin rating slightly higher than that (maybe around 3400k) without being tinted/coated?
    The Philips HIR2 (which isn't applicable to your car) has a CCT of about 3450K. This is about as high as it gets given the properties the filament. I'm not sure why you'd want it any higher-- it doesn't need to "match" anything but the other lamp with the same function (high beam or low beam) and higher CCTs get harder for the human optical system to process.

    Your high beams are the H7-- unless you can get the Osram Rallye 65W, get these or these (ordinarily I'd recommend a Philips H7 sold by Amazon but there are some reports that there are counterfeit ones in the stream). Some sites may claim there's a 55W Vosla +120 bulb that is just as good as the Osram Rallye 65W, but that's all lies and jest.

    That car is now about 4 years old-- make sure the lenses are still in excellent condition and find a shop to aim those lamps properly (one with the right equipment, not just a wall to shine the lights on).
    Last edited by Alaric Darconville; 12-12-2017 at 11:41 AM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: 2014 Fusion H11 to H9 Conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaric Darconville View Post
    [IMG]file:///C:/Users/Russell/AppData/Local/Temp/msohtmlclip1/01/clip_image001.gif[/IMG]
    I don't blame you wanting to err on the side of caution-- typically a projector lamp will do better with the H9 than a reflector lamp, but optical concerns aren't the only issue-- the H9 produces more heat and can be problematic for wiring and the lamp materials. I don't have the data to advise with certainty that you'll be OK to proceed.


    Those will be good (so long as the upgrade is permissible. -Virgil- may be along soon with that data).
    You could always do a voltage drop test to see if the wiring is really up to the task at least, but there are still other materials in the lamp that could be damaged. And there's still a potential for excessive glare.
    Okay, so I did a voltage drop test and the results are interesting. With the car off (in accessory mode), the battery voltage being around 12.18V there is very minimal loss of voltage to the driver and passenger headlights (around a 19.2mV and 21.6mV drop respectively). I also measured parking light drop, just to have another baseline, which was 26.6mV and 28.7mV respectively for driver and passenger sides.

    With the car on, and the battery voltage being about 14.42V, the drop was rather significant. The driver's side being 0.985V (resulting in 13.44V to the bulb) and the passenger 0.743V (13.68V to bulb). For reference, the driver parking light had a 18.0mV drop and the passenger parking light had a 21.7mV drop.

    I have a hunch, which you may be able to confirm or deny, which is that the SJB (Smart Junction Box, unit that controls voltages to headlights) is intentionally powering the headlights at around that 13.44/13.68V as to not overdrive the bulbs resulting in a shorter lifespan. Even further speculating (i.e. completely not based on facts - maybe you can confirm or deny this) it is powering the passenger slightly higher to prevent glare to oncoming drivers? I'm not sure - either way these are the results.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaric Darconville View Post
    The Philips HIR2 (which isn't applicable to your car) has a CCT of about 3450K. This is about as high as it gets given the properties the filament. I'm not sure why you'd want it any higher-- it doesn't need to "match" anything but the other lamp with the same function (high beam or low beam) and higher CCTs get harder for the human optical system to process.
    I guess I prefer a 3400K color because it's "closer to daylight", but if you say that it won't help improve my vision then I won't try for a higher kelvin bulb. With that being said I have a few questions out of curiosity.
    1) How can the Philips XtremeVision H11s be rated at 3400K when they don't have a coating and aren't HIRs?
    2) Is the claim that 4300K HIDs are better for night time driving because they're closest to daylight true? Or is that just a marketing gimmick?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaric Darconville View Post
    Your high beams are the H7-- unless you can get the Osram Rallye 65W, get these or these (ordinarily I'd recommend a Philips H7 sold by Amazon but there are some reports that there are counterfeit ones in the stream). Some sites may claim there's a 55W Vosla +120 bulb that is just as good as the Osram Rallye 65W, but that's all lies and jest.
    Iíll look into those. Would you say that the Xenon bulbs are worth the extra money? Or are the Platinumís sufficient for most cases?


    Quote Originally Posted by Alaric Darconville View Post
    That car is now about 4 years old-- make sure the lenses are still in excellent condition and find a shop to aim those lamps properly (one with the right equipment, not just a wall to shine the lights on).
    My lenses are in perfect condition. I make sure to apply a layer of wax on them at least once a month to keep the integrity of the clear coat.

  4. #4

    Default Re: 2014 Fusion H11 to H9 Conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by Yoyomah20 View Post
    Okay, so I did a voltage drop test
    Good. Were all bulbs connected and lit when you were testing, or did you pull off the socket and probe it?

    battery voltage being around 12.18V
    That's interesting. You should see 12.6.

    With the car on, and the battery voltage being about 14.42V, the drop was rather significant. The driver's side being 0.985V (resulting in 13.44V to the bulb) and the passenger 0.743V (13.68V to bulb).
    The US test voltage for bulbs is 12.8v. The European test voltage, in most cases, is 13.2v. Either which way, and assuming you tested with the bulbs all hooked up, your bulbs are getting more voltage than the rated value.

    I have a hunch, which you may be able to confirm or deny, which is that the SJB (Smart Junction Box, unit that controls voltages to headlights) is intentionally powering the headlights at around that 13.44/13.68V as to not overdrive the bulbs
    Could very easily be.

    Even further speculating (i.e. completely not based on facts - maybe you can confirm or deny this) it is powering the passenger slightly higher to prevent glare to oncoming drivers?
    This is definitely not happening.

    I guess I prefer a 3400K color because it's "closer to daylight"
    Except it isn't. That whole narrative, "closer to daylight", is used to push higher and higher and higher CTs or CCTs. Technically it's true that noontime sunlight under standard conditions (cloudless sky, no pollution or haze, etc) is considered to have a CT of 6500K, but all that lets us say is that the closer your light bulb (or LED, fluorescent tube, etc) gets to 6500K, the closer its CCT is to the assumed CT of noontime-sun daylight. That doesn't tell us anything else about the light -- its spectral power distribution, most critically -- and so it is false and not real to claim that an artificial light source puts out light "close to daylight" because its CCT is close (or relatively closer) to 6500K.

    if you say that it won't help improve my vision
    It won't.

    How can the Philips XtremeVision H11s be rated at 3400K when they don't have a coating and aren't HIRs?
    The one isn't necessary to obtain the other. Halogen bulbs with uncolored glass tend to have a CT of between 3050K and 3500K, depending on factors like filament pitch and luminance. Those, in turn, tend to be driven by whether the goal is maximum lifespan (low luminance, low CT) or maximum performance (high luminance, high CT).

    2) Is the claim that 4300K HIDs are better for night time driving because they're closest to daylight true? Or is that just a marketing gimmick?
    Baseless hype.

    Iíll look into those. Would you say that the Xenon bulbs are worth the extra money? Or are the Platinumís sufficient for most cases?
    The Osram 65w H7 is no longer available, though there have been some nasty counterfeits found. Dan Stern tells me he's having 65w H7-type bulbs made in Germany, but I don't know when (or really if) he'll have them in stock. The Night Hawk Xenon (+120) does give better performance/somewhat shorter life than the Night Hawk Platinum (somewhere between +50 and +80). For the low beams, your original plan to put in an H9 is fine in those headlamps and gives good value for dollar: less expensive bulb, more light on the road, and about the same lifespan as the +120 bulbs.


    My lenses are in perfect condition.
    Good. Make super-sure the lamps are aimed correctly .

  5. #5

    Default Re: 2014 Fusion H11 to H9 Conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by -Virgil- View Post
    Good. Were all bulbs connected and lit when you were testing, or did you pull off the socket and probe it?
    I couldn't figure out how to leave them connected and test the voltage, I just have a basic multimeter with the little pin test probes.

    Quote Originally Posted by -Virgil- View Post
    That's interesting. You should see 12.6.
    I did the test after my car had been sitting all night


    Quote Originally Posted by -Virgil- View Post
    The US test voltage for bulbs is 12.8v. The European test voltage, in most cases, is 13.2v. Either which way, and assuming you tested with the bulbs all hooked up, your bulbs are getting more voltage than the rated value.
    Probably because the bulbs weren't connected


    Quote Originally Posted by -Virgil- View Post
    The Osram 65w H7 is no longer available, though there have been some nasty counterfeits found. Dan Stern tells me he's having 65w H7-type bulbs made in Germany, but I don't know when (or really if) he'll have them in stock. The Night Hawk Xenon (+120) does give better performance/somewhat shorter life than the Night Hawk Platinum (somewhere between +50 and +80). For the low beams, your original plan to put in an H9 is fine in those headlamps and gives good value for dollar: less expensive bulb, more light on the road, and about the same lifespan as the +120 bulbs.
    Awesome, thanks so much for your help!

  6. #6

    Default Re: 2014 Fusion H11 to H9 Conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by Yoyomah20 View Post
    I couldn't figure out how to leave them connected and test the voltage, I just have a basic multimeter with the little pin test probes.
    Trick i use if you don't want to poke holes in your wires (which you don't) is to carefully back probe the harness connector with something small like a needle or pin. Then alligator clip the multimeter leads to the pin
    Last edited by Alaric Darconville; 12-14-2017 at 12:20 AM. Reason: fixed quote tagging

  7. #7

    Default Re: 2014 Fusion H11 to H9 Conversion

    Jason's got the right idea: backprobe using a pin. Testing with the socket connected doesn't give any useful information.

    And you should still see about 12.6 even if the car's been sitting overnight. Either you've got a bigger-than-normal parasitic draw or your battery's headed south.

  8. #8
    Moderator Alaric Darconville's Avatar
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    Default Re: 2014 Fusion H11 to H9 Conversion

    Quote Originally Posted by Yoyomah20 View Post
    I did the test after my car had been sitting all night
    If it's the factory battery, it's possible it's approaching 5 years old. It's possible it's going out. There might be very light loads on it all night (the alarm system, for example) but that still seems like it might be a bit low. You might consider disconnecting the battery immediately after getting home and letting it sit disconnected for at least 8 hours. If it's at or below 12.4V after that, that could signal a problem. Is it extremely cold where you are? I'm assuming you must live in more northern latitudes because you say the lenses are in excellent condition, so perhaps you've also got some low temperatures going on right about now-- very low temperatures could affect the battery.

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