HDS Systems        
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 31 to 48 of 48

Thread: Are these lights ready for the trash?

  1. #31

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ls400 View Post
    Thanks for the advice. I do have 9012s and 9011s on the way.
    That's a good set of bulbs.

    At the Wal-Mart, the best pick would be the Xtravision.

  2. #32

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by -Virgil- View Post
    That's a good set of bulbs.

    At the Wal-Mart, the best pick would be the Xtravision.
    Thanks, duly noted. I'll get those next time I'm in a squeeze instead of the silver stars. I've noticed that once or twice Walmart will have a few Sylvania basic 9012s but it is very rare to see them.

    Do you mind addressing the other part of my post regarding the partial blue coat?

  3. #33
    Moderator Alaric Darconville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Stillwater, America
    Posts
    4,502

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ls400 View Post
    The Silver Stars do indeed have a band of blue around the tip and a band of blue around the base, and a gap between the blue bands about where the filament is. Would the selective blue-tinting enable Sylvania to make the Silver Stars a better performer than the Xtravisions, which are completely clear?
    The tinted bands exist to bring the total output of the bulb to legal limits, while still leaving the filament fully exposed to the lamp reflector. This is an oft-used, legitimate technique.

    For a confluence of price, performance, and lifetime, the Xtravisions are the way to go.

  4. #34

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Thin bands of blue far away from the filament are much preferable to thick bands of blue with just a small ring of uncolored glass (as found on the Silver Star Ultra)

  5. #35
    Moderator Alaric Darconville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Stillwater, America
    Posts
    4,502

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by -Virgil- View Post
    Thin bands of blue far away from the filament are much preferable to thick bands of blue with just a small ring of uncolored glass (as found on the Silver Star Ultra)
    Oh, yeah-- forgot that part. The bands on the SilverStar Ultra are gigantic compared to the Philips X-Treme Power, and encroach into the useful filament 'window' area.

    LS, once you get your set of new, correct bulbs, you should never be "in a pinch" because you'll keep spares on board the vehicle, and will immediately order a new set of bulbs when you have to use a spare.

  6. #36

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by -Virgil- View Post
    Thin bands of blue far away from the filament are much preferable to thick bands of blue with just a small ring of uncolored glass (as found on the Silver Star Ultra)
    Is there an optimal amount of blue surface area for a given bulb type, or is that dependent on reflector/projector design?

  7. #37

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ls400 View Post
    Is there an optimal amount of blue surface area for a given bulb type
    As little as possible and still squeak/sneak past the lumen limit.

  8. #38

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by -Virgil- View Post
    As little as possible and still squeak/sneak past the lumen limit.
    But if there's an almost non-existent band of blue, is that going to measurably affect the amount of light recorded by the integrating sphere? Isn't the purpose of the bands to allow the filament to be overdriven by filtering out some "unwanted" light?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaric Darconville View Post
    For a confluence of price, performance, and lifetime, the Xtravisions are the way to go.
    Just for the sake of completeness, sometimes I notice that there are untinted Sylvania Silver stars for sale at Wal-Mart. They are untinted and lack the "ultra" moniker. I presume that these are brighter than the Xtravisions? (Don't worry, I'm just going to stick with 9012s in the future...waiting for the Volsa 9012+120!)

    Example of a non-ultra Sylvania Silver star:

    https://www.amazon.com/SYLVANIA-SilverStar-Performance-Headlight-Contains/dp/B000BLKVAM
    Last edited by Ls400; 10-22-2018 at 10:52 PM.

  9. #39
    Moderator Alaric Darconville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Stillwater, America
    Posts
    4,502

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ls400 View Post
    But if there's an almost non-existent band of blue, is that going to measurably affect the amount of light recorded by the integrating sphere?
    Yes. If the band exists, it is filtering light. This should go without saying.

    Isn't the purpose of the bands to allow the filament to be overdriven by filtering out some "unwanted" light?
    Not totally "unwanted", but less-useful/useless at the very least.

    Just for the sake of completeness, sometimes I notice that there are untinted Sylvania Silver stars for sale at Wal-Mart. They are untinted and lack the "ultra" moniker. I presume that these are brighter than the Xtravisions? (Don't worry, I'm just going to stick with 9012s in the future...waiting for the Volsa 9012+120!)

    Example of a non-ultra Sylvania Silver star:
    https://www.amazon.com/SYLVANIA-Silv.../dp/B000BLKVAM
    Tinted. Maybe you need to adjust the CCT of your monitor; the pictures show light tinting on the SilverStar and more obviously on the two zXe variants.

    The zXe Gold ones, if I could suspend my disbelief that they'd really be any good, has very carefully deposited (or laser-ablated), and fairly deep blue, tinting with distinct windows to the filament. I'd like to say they found a way to have stupendously bright filaments that need that much tint to bring them down to legal limits, and therefore the unfiltered light will make the Most. Awesome. Beam. Ever., but this is a Sylvania bulb.

    (It would be nice if any of the banded bulbs used a yellow tint instead of blue, because that would make the scatter light less troublesome than if it tended toward blue. Blue light is a fairly small component of a bulb's output, so it would take a lot of yellow area to do that. Perhaps something along the lines of how the zXe Gold has the very distinct window formation on it. Yellow off-axis light may diminish front turn signal visibility, so that could be one reason to use blue.)

  10. #40

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaric Darconville View Post
    Yes. If the band exists, it is filtering light. This should go without saying.
    Yes, but let's say you have a bulb with a 0.1mm band of blue. And another bulb with a 0.5mm band.

    Wouldn't the bulb with the 0.5mm band of blue be able to further overdrive its filament and create more "useful" light? A 0.5mm band also shouldn't have that much more of an effect on filtering out useful light, versus a 0.1mm band, right?

    What I'm confused about is the assertion that as little blue as possible is optimal, because surely there's a confluence of blue area and "useful" light produced?
    Last edited by Ls400; 10-23-2018 at 11:13 AM.

  11. #41

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ls400 View Post
    I notice that there are untinted Sylvania Silver stars for sale at Wal-Mart.
    No, there aren't any untinted Sylvania Silver Star bulbs. The ones you are pointing at as "untinted" actually have a blue tint to the entire glass capsule. It's not as dark a blue, but it is definitely there, without any untinted bands or gaps. And no, they are not better than the Xtravisions.

  12. #42

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaric Darconville View Post
    The zXe Gold ones, if I could suspend my disbelief that they'd really be any good, has very carefully deposited (or laser-ablated), and fairly deep blue, tinting with distinct windows to the filament.
    Looks like an American-market version of the Osram Night Breaker Laser bulbs, which don't seem to live up to the hype used to market them.

    (It would be nice if any of the banded bulbs used a yellow tint instead of blue
    Those exist (Sylvania Fog Vision)

  13. #43
    Moderator Alaric Darconville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Stillwater, America
    Posts
    4,502

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by -Virgil- View Post
    It would be nice if any of the banded bulbs used a yellow tint instead of blue
    Those exist (Sylvania Fog Vision)
    Oh, but not quite! This is tinting the light in the main beam, and light outside the main beam is untinted. I'd like to see the yellow bands placed such as where the blue ones are used, so that maximum output is within legal limits, light outside the main beam tends much more towards yellow than blue, and the main beam is still untinted.

    This is just a very crude mockup:

  14. #44

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Oh, I see what you mean.

    H'mmm. Interesting idea: It might turn some of the stray light outside the beam pattern yellow, depending on the paths of the stray light rays within the headlamp. I'm not sure how much benefit, if any, would result. Also, yellow tinting isn't as effective as blue for blocking light to "artificially" depress the output reading in the integrating sphere, so the beam performance wouldn't be as effective.

    I wonder what would happen with a non-blue, non-yellow, non-any-other-color mask for that purpose. Photographers call it "neutral density" filtration: it reduces light without tinting it, so it looks gray.

  15. #45
    Moderator Alaric Darconville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Stillwater, America
    Posts
    4,502

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by -Virgil- View Post
    H'mmm. Interesting idea: It might turn some of the stray light outside the beam pattern yellow, depending on the paths of the stray light rays within the headlamp. I'm not sure how much benefit, if any, would result.
    It would look less "cool" but also be less glaring than blue.

    Also, yellow tinting isn't as effective as blue for blocking light to "artificially" depress the output reading in the integrating sphere, so the beam performance wouldn't be as effective.
    Depth of tint would certainly be a factor, but maybe too deep and it would lead to excessive heating of the envelope.

    I wonder what would happen with a non-blue, non-yellow, non-any-other-color mask for that purpose. Photographers call it "neutral density" filtration: it reduces light without tinting it, so it looks gray.
    Or yellow-gray, even (which has color, yes, but a benign one). That would increase the transparency and reduce envelope heating a little.
    It could be a problem the bulbmakers have worked on already.

  16. #46

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Why not try this?

    https://www.danielsternlighting.com/...ght_color.html

    He suggests taping the lens of a headlamp with this:

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007GCNAB6/?tag=2402507-20

    Or spraying it with this:

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000994BUW//?tag=2402507-20

    Perhaps a selective tint of the outermost lens would achieve the same effect?

    Isn't the upper rear portion of a reflector headlamp responsible for distance vision? With that in mind, perhaps one could selectively tint parts of the outer lens through which most of the light responsible for distance vision does not travel?

  17. #47
    Moderator Alaric Darconville's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Stillwater, America
    Posts
    4,502

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ls400 View Post
    Why not try this?
    Taping the lens of the headlamp in such a way that the light in the main part of the beam is uncolored, and the light outside of the main part of the beam is uncolored, is much more difficult than you might think.

    Or spraying it with this:
    Again, it's more complicated than you might think. The lens has a (typically) convex shape, and there's a reflector behind it with a complex or semi-complex surface. Some headamp lenses have fluting and cuts in them to manage the beam. Determining the exact spots to color would be a very complicated thing indeed.

    Isn't the upper rear portion of a reflector headlamp responsible for distance vision?
    Taking a sealed beam lamp as an example, the main (high) filament is placed in the center of the unit, the low beam filament is placed higher, and sometimes is even a bit rearward. More of its light hits the top of the reflector, which then directs it downward. For headlamps using the HB2, the low beam filament is forward of the high beam filament, so it too is in a different focal point. Often, you'll see a car using its low beams and it appears that the top half of the reflector is lit up more than the bottom half.

    Consider if the light were bouncing off the bottom half of the reflector-- it'd then bounce upward.

    And so if you were to carefully mask everything off so it would have the desired effect on the low beam, it'd be vastly different if you switched to high beams on a single-compartment high/low beam headlamp.

    However, if you do all the appropriate tinting on the bulb itself (as has been done with the high-performance halogen bulbs that use the blue banding) then it would work all the time, in any lamp that accepted the bulb type.

    Now, if I wanted ALL the light leaving my headlamp to be yellow, sure, I could tape it/paint it. But that's not what I want.
    Last edited by Alaric Darconville; 10-24-2018 at 04:02 PM.

  18. #48

    Default Re: Are these lights ready for the trash?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ls400 View Post
    Isn't the upper rear portion of a reflector headlamp responsible for distance vision?
    No. It is not possible to generalize like this.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •