🎄Don't Forget the Women in Your Lives🎁

letschat7

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 7, 2022
Messages
2,010
Location
West Virginia, North America
Kind of shocking that a Fenix store thread is now 3 pages long.
Well I guess they have one hell of a marketing department that can generate this much discussion. I like Fenix I don't even have to question their products I just pick one from a category that I'm interested in and it works well. Now if the other Chinese companies could only emulate Fenix I would be much less interested in USA lights.
 
Joined
Oct 26, 2009
Messages
851
Location
Columbus, Ohio
Please provide 1 DOCUMENTED incident where the SOS feature on ANY flashlight was used for a save of any person?

Strobe can certainly be used to gain attention, and I myself have used, and do use strobe for that.
This is a repeat of one of my posts from 2009:

...n prior years I participated in search and rescue operations when I lived in Colorado and in California. I remember one call in particular that is relevant to this thread: a hiker suffered a broken ankle while exploring off-trail. Nothing life-threatening, but he couldn't hike down the mountain without help. The hiker had a good quality light equipped with a strobe function, and was able to alert a passing motorist (driving in the valley more than 5,000 feet lower in elevation) that somebody up on the mountain needed some sort of help. The motorist saw the strobe and was was alert enought to figure out what it meant, and responsible enough to contact local law enforcement. The SAR volunteer team was alerted and dispatched. It was already dark of course, but we knew there was a well-established trail nearby, and had confidence that the subject would be able to pinpoint his or her location with the light. We found him pretty quickly, thanks in part to the victim's flashlight. We were able to evacuate him to medical attention within four hours of receiving the call.

If not for the strobe that caught the motorist's attention, the injured hiker's rescue might have been delayed for two or more days, probably until Monday at the earliest, when the hiker would have failed to show up at his job. The hiker reported that his co-workers knew of his weekend plans, and his route, so I'm pretty sure he would have been found before he ran out of food and water. He would however have been in pain for at least three days, and without immediate medical attention, his ankle injury might have been much worse.

I vote to keep the strobe feature available. You can hide it all you want, but it does have value.
 

RWT1405

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Dec 2, 2007
Messages
1,259
Location
PA
This is a repeat of one of my posts from 2009:

...n prior years I participated in search and rescue operations when I lived in Colorado and in California. I remember one call in particular that is relevant to this thread: a hiker suffered a broken ankle while exploring off-trail. Nothing life-threatening, but he couldn't hike down the mountain without help. The hiker had a good quality light equipped with a strobe function, and was able to alert a passing motorist (driving in the valley more than 5,000 feet lower in elevation) that somebody up on the mountain needed some sort of help. The motorist saw the strobe and was was alert enought to figure out what it meant, and responsible enough to contact local law enforcement. The SAR volunteer team was alerted and dispatched. It was already dark of course, but we knew there was a well-established trail nearby, and had confidence that the subject would be able to pinpoint his or her location with the light. We found him pretty quickly, thanks in part to the victim's flashlight. We were able to evacuate him to medical attention within four hours of receiving the call.

If not for the strobe that caught the motorist's attention, the injured hiker's rescue might have been delayed for two or more days, probably until Monday at the earliest, when the hiker would have failed to show up at his job. The hiker reported that his co-workers knew of his weekend plans, and his route, so I'm pretty sure he would have been found before he ran out of food and water. He would however have been in pain for at least three days, and without immediate medical attention, his ankle injury might have been much worse.

I vote to keep the strobe feature available. You can hide it all you want, but it does have value.

Good story and appreciated!

However, I am questioning the successful use of the SOS feature, and not STROBE, during a rescue

I agree that the STROBE feature can be useful, and as previously stated I use the STROBE feature regularly to gain attention

The SOS feature, I have doubts that it has ever been used successfully during a rescue

So while your story is good, it is not a use of the SOS feature

It does, however, confirm how STROBE can be useful

But NOT SOS
 
Top