800+ lumen compact light

Haesslich

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I'm not opposed to buying a monolithic light if its design particularly appeals to me, but when it comes to a light that meets a specific functional purpose, I much prefer modular lights so I can upgrade them easily in the future.

If he's already got a Surefire tube to drop it into, that's a perfectly usable option. But if he doesn't, then buying a dedicated light like that works pretty well too - and with fewer parts to fall out or lose. That, and he'd be spending at least $120 on the Surefire and then more on the drop-in... only to set the expensive part of the light aside.

The TK35's a good option for semi-compact; it's more compact than some of the lights I can name which put out a similar or greater amount of light (Olight SR 50/51/91/92,Thrunite Catapult V3), uses easier to find batteries than the Maelstrom S12 or S18, and is lighter than the Fenix TK41 or TK50/60 series. That, and the low and medium modes are very usable outside; you don't usually need to go past High if you need a lot of light.

And if I was to recommend a Surefire with 800 lumens with an LED if there was no budget to consider, the UB3T's out there... :D
 

LEDninja

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I plan on using it for outdoor use. I live in a pretty quiet area,
For outdoor use, especially if there is a lot of vegetation a bright cool white LED may not work as well as a neutral tinted LED.

As you can see from the beamshots in the threads below there are other things than sheer brightness that let you see better outdoors.

http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb...lights-do-you-love-em-If-not-take-a-look-here!
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb...ion-and-Tint-Comparison-Cree-Rebel-GDP-Nichia
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?257789-quot-Neutral-quot-vs-Cool-light
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb...-the-Zebralight-SC51w-(replete-with-beamshots!)

If you get a Fenix LD40, it may perform better outdoors than the PD31 despite having less lumens. (1. Neutral tint. 2.Bigger reflector for more throw.)
Most of the other high end brands also carry neutral/warm tints but 4sevens is all sold out.
 

Bbucs726

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For outdoor use, especially if there is a lot of vegetation a bright cool white LED may not work as well as a neutral tinted LED.

As you can see from the beamshots in the threads below there are other things than sheer brightness that let you see better outdoors.

http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb...lights-do-you-love-em-If-not-take-a-look-here!
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb...ion-and-Tint-Comparison-Cree-Rebel-GDP-Nichia
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?257789-quot-Neutral-quot-vs-Cool-light
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?308286-A-look-at-the-Zebralight-SC51w-(replete-with-beamshots!)

If you get a Fenix LD40, it may perform better outdoors than the PD31 despite having less lumens. (1. Neutral tint. 2.Bigger reflector for more throw.)
Most of the other high end brands also carry neutral/warm tints but 4sevens is all sold out.

Hmm that's something I haven't thought about before. After looking at the two comparisons, the neutral white is definitely nicer outside. Is the TK35 neutral or cool? What about something like the p-rocket XM-L? http://www.shiningbeam.com/servlet/the-97/**NEW**--P-dsh-Rocket-XM-dsh-L/Detail
 
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LEDninja

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Hmm that's something I haven't thought about before. After looking at the two comparisons, the neutral white is definitely nicer outside. Is the TK35 neutral or cool? What about something like the p-rocket XM-L? http://www.shiningbeam.com/servlet/the-97/**NEW**--P-dsh-Rocket-XM-dsh-L/Detail
I think the TK35 only comes in cool, the LD40 in neutral and a few other Fenix torches in both.

The P-rocket comes in both cool and neutral. You seem to have found the neutral version.
Take the warnings seriously if you do not want a quick death for the P-rocket.
* Recommend not to run over 15 minutes continuously on high mode when using 2xCR123A
** Do not run it with 2xRCR123A rechargeable Li-ion**
A member tried 2xRCR123A and had to buy a new light.
 

Bbucs726

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The P-rocket comes in both cool and neutral. You seem to have found the neutral version.
Take the warnings seriously if you do not want a quick death for the P-rocket.
* Recommend not to run over 15 minutes continuously on high mode when using 2xCR123A
** Do not run it with 2xRCR123A rechargeable Li-ion**
A member tried 2xRCR123A and had to buy a new light.

Yeah if i do get the P-rocket, i'll definitely follow the recommendations. Do you know why is there no limit when using an 18650 battery?
 

Enzo

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I've had the TK35 for about 3 weeks now and love it. Solidly built and pretty compact due to the batteries running in parallel. I use AW 18650's at 2900mAh. Good compromise between throw and flood and the strobe has made me dizzy on more than one occasion...
 

Jeff E.

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If I were you, I'd SERIOUSLY consider the Fenix TK41 which will seriously throw 800 lumens! To echo the comments here, with current technology, it's tough to get 800 lumens out of anything the size of the PD31, especially without seriously unfavorable heat and runtime issues. I have the TK41's predecessor, the TK40, which has a max output of 630 lumens, and I absolutely LOVE the thing. Incredible throw for a light of it's size! And, I fill it with 8 AA eneloops which I recharge in Titanium Innovations 8-Bay Charger. It's a match made in heaven, and a small and affordable package for what it offers. Just my 2 cents...
 

fyrstormer

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If he's already got a Surefire tube to drop it into, that's a perfectly usable option. But if he doesn't, then buying a dedicated light like that works pretty well too - and with fewer parts to fall out or lose. That, and he'd be spending at least $120 on the Surefire and then more on the drop-in... only to set the expensive part of the light aside.
Last I checked, my Surefires and SF-clones don't require complete disassembly to change the batteries, so I think he's pretty safe against losing parts regardless. But upgradeability is a nice thing to have, hence all the upgrades available for Surefires and SF-clones.

And if I was to recommend a Surefire with 800 lumens with an LED if there was no budget to consider, the UB3T's out there... :D
Budgeting is a problem, yes, and the monolithic lights win on that point. Still, if you consider you can do about 2-3 upgrades on a modular light before the standard drifts too far for new parts to fit anymore, AND you don't have whole leftover lights sitting unused in a drawer somewhere, the extra cost for the modular lights becomes easier to deal with.
 

fyrstormer

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For outdoor use, especially if there is a lot of vegetation a bright cool white LED may not work as well as a neutral tinted LED.
This debate will rage forever. My stance is that neutral-tinted LEDs make vegetation look dead. Hi-CRI neutrals are a lot better, but the regular ones aren't so great.
 

LEDninja

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Yeah if i do get the P-rocket, i'll definitely follow the recommendations. Do you know why is there no limit when using an 18650 battery?
The P-rocket's driver uses 8*AMC7135 controller chips for 2.8A output.
Power in
3.6V (18650 low) 4.68W,
4.2V (18650 max) 11.6W,
6V (2*CR123A) 14.28W
7.2V (2*RCR123A low) ?
8.4V (2*RCR123A high) ?
A single 18650 never reaches the voltage/wattage limit.

Reference
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?192925-AMC7135-Specs-Inside-**UPDATE**
I just doubled the 1400 mA driver numbers to get 2800 mA numbers.

If you look at the charts the driver only give you max output above 4V.
So a 18650 will give max output in the 4.2-4.0V portion of its run and be dimmer in the 4.0-3.6V part.
2*CR123A starts at 6V and still is above 4V close to empty giving you full power all the way.


This debate will rage forever. My stance is that neutral-tinted LEDs make vegetation look dead. Hi-CRI neutrals are a lot better, but the regular ones aren't so great.
Outside of Zebralight and custom builds, where do you find Hi-CRI neutrals?

I live downtown no vegetation to aim at. I also have beige walls giving me a dirty brown beam. I ended up giving my Dereelight Q2 5A away. When I was at a Toronto GTA meet in High Park I find the ordinary neutral still a little bit better than the typical cool LED which puts a blue cast over everything.
My favourite tint is the old Luxeon WO. Kind of a creamy white, halfway between the cool white and neutral. Takes the blue cast away without making the vegetation look dead.
Never got a high CRI.
 
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Haesslich

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Hmm that's something I haven't thought about before. After looking at the two comparisons, the neutral white is definitely nicer outside. Is the TK35 neutral or cool? What about something like the p-rocket XM-L? http://www.shiningbeam.com/servlet/the-97/**NEW**--P-dsh-Rocket-XM-dsh-L/Detail

Depends on the TK35 you get - mine's on the warm side of cool, and it's not as warm as my LD40, although the reflector's a decent depth. Some people have had very green TK35's as well as very blue ones. Mine's creamy white, leaning towards yellow... and it worked pretty well the last time I pulled it out in a park.

Last I checked, my Surefires and SF-clones don't require complete disassembly to change the batteries, so I think he's pretty safe against losing parts regardless. But upgradeability is a nice thing to have, hence all the upgrades available for Surefires and SF-clones.

It's nice to be able to upgrade, but at the same time if you're spending $80-100 on the drop-ins on top of the $120-130 for the original light whose most expensive component just got tossed onto a shelf, I consider that a bit of a waste, especially since that $80-$100 for the drop-in would've gotten you a perfectly serviceable light. Better to have two than one, in my books. The main reason Surefires were so modular wasn't because you could upgrade them easily, but because you could replace dead components in the field without having to send the whole light back to the manufacturer, IIRC. The fact you could build a new drop-in module was a bonus for enthusiasts, whereas being able to easily swap out dead sections was more important to their target market.

Budgeting is a problem, yes, and the monolithic lights win on that point. Still, if you consider you can do about 2-3 upgrades on a modular light before the standard drifts too far for new parts to fit anymore, AND you don't have whole leftover lights sitting unused in a drawer somewhere, the extra cost for the modular lights becomes easier to deal with.

So it's better to have modules which are useless without a body lying in a drawer somewhere, instead of whole lights which can be carried as backups or given away to others, or resold to friends/strangers? Again, the cost of the upgrades is pretty much the cost of a whole light these days, unless you're buying whole new Surefire units. And even then, not all the parts are interchangeable between series; it's not like you can drop an E2-compatable head on a G2 or L-series body, and vice-versa.

I think I'll stick with the whole-light route; yes, I've got an extra body and head lying around, but I can also pick it up if my primary dies or carry it as my backup, or hand it out as a loaner if someone bugs me for a light.
 
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JerBear

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I have been having the same debate in my head of which light to buy; I too want a powerful light ~800 lumens give or take. Remember when you get that high in lumens 700 and 800 lumens aren't that dicernable to the eye, you would have to do a side by side comparison to tell, so don't get too hung up on the light being 800 lumens.
After doing a lot of research myself, I have decided the best light for overall brightness and throw combined with the compact size (IDK how much size matters to you) is the Thrunite Scorpion V2 with I think 680 lumens on 1X 18650, or 750 lumens on 2XCR123's.
That's my opinion.
Click this link and scroll down to the beamshots, you will see how the Thrunite Scorpion V2 compares to the Fenix TK35 and other lights; it's an obvious winner to me.
Hope that helped.
popcorn.gif
 

veedo

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ive been using the tk35 at work (power plant) for the last couple weeks, and i frieking love this thing. its the perfect work light for what i do. most of the time, medium is all that is needed, but turbo is awesome to check something out at a distance. i keep it in my back pocket just like i did with my old streamlight so it isnt too big to be a work edc for me.
 

Bbucs726

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If I were you, I'd SERIOUSLY consider the Fenix TK41 which will seriously throw 800 lumens! To echo the comments here, with current technology, it's tough to get 800 lumens out of anything the size of the PD31, especially without seriously unfavorable heat and runtime issues. I have the TK41's predecessor, the TK40, which has a max output of 630 lumens, and I absolutely LOVE the thing. Incredible throw for a light of it's size! And, I fill it with 8 AA eneloops which I recharge in Titanium Innovations 8-Bay Charger. It's a match made in heaven, and a small and affordable package for what it offers. Just my 2 cents...

yeah i've looked at the TK41 and i really like it. What i don't particularly care for though, at least from what i've read, is that the hotspot is just too small and tight especially compared to the spill. It seems like the TK35 is pretty good overall, but the TK41 has better throw.
 

fyrstormer

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Outside of Zebralight and custom builds, where do you find Hi-CRI neutrals?

I live downtown no vegetation to aim at. I also have beige walls giving me a dirty brown beam. I ended up giving my Dereelight Q2 5A away. When I was at a Toronto GTA meet in High Park I find the ordinary neutral still a little bit better than the typical cool LED which puts a blue cast over everything.
My favourite tint is the old Luxeon WO. Kind of a creamy white, halfway between the cool white and neutral. Takes the blue cast away without making the vegetation look dead.
Never got a high CRI.
I didn't know Zebralight made them. Interesting.

Anyway, you can order a Hi-CRI light from HDS (or you could, anyway), and I modded a Haiku XR-E with the same emitter the HDS uses -- the Seoul P4 Hi-CRI. Neutral-to-warm tint, but it picks up blues much better than any normal neutral-to-warm emitter ever could. Cree also offers a warm-tint Hi-CRI emitter now, a variation on the XP-E. I have one sitting on my desk, but I haven't decided what to put it in. Maybe a McGizmo Sapphire...
 

fyrstormer

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So it's better to have modules which are useless without a body lying in a drawer somewhere, instead of whole lights which can be carried as backups or given away to others, or resold to friends/strangers? Again, the cost of the upgrades is pretty much the cost of a whole light these days, unless you're buying whole new Surefire units. And even then, not all the parts are interchangeable between series; it's not like you can drop an E2-compatable head on a G2 or L-series body, and vice-versa.
I suppose it's worth mentioning that I don't replace the light engines in my modular lights every time a new emitter comes out. The primary attraction of the upgradeability, for me, is not the ability to replace parts on a whim but the ability to use exactly the parts I want the first time, so I don't get tempted to buy a new light every month. Sounds better on paper than it works in real life, but since I stopped buying lights with poor resale value a couple years ago, at least my investment is relatively safe if I get bored and sell them off.

I haven't seen a new light, modular or monolithic, in the past nine months that's made me think "hmm, that looks better than what I've got now, I should get one." I attribute that primarily to having bought modular light parts that I was able to assemble into exactly the lights I want, and nothing pre-made comes as close to meeting my needs as what I have now.
 
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