A small CR2 or CR123A headlamp, what's popular these days?

mrme

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Mar 21, 2003
Messages
372
Location
Houston, TX
I haven't kept up much with headlamps the last quite a few years.

When I go hiking or climbing, I like to have a couple headlamps in the first aid kit for those cases when things go awry. The old BD Ion headlamps I used to keep handy got ruined, so I'm looking for something small, light, and reliable to replace them.

Recently I picked up a Steripen water purifier that uses CR123A lithium batteries, so it would be ideal to have compatible parts. My EDC light uses a CR2, so that would also be a good choice for battery.

From what I can see, most of the CR123A headlamps are heavy ones made out of aluminum that put out more light than you would ever need when hiking.

The only one I can find that seems to fit the bill is the PrincetonTec Remix Pro. It doesn't get great reviews, and the battery door clip looks like it would be really hard to open with cold hands.

Are there any others I should be looking at?
 

Brightholzer

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Mar 27, 2013
Messages
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Hi mrme,
Curious, have you been a Steripen user and/or are you switching from mechanical filters? I've certainly migrated flashlights to match a headlamp and a minimalistic lantern. I prefer 2xAAA headlamps. I don't have enough favor for the Steripen system to let it drive or direct choices in other pieces in the kit, especially while keeping ultra light. We do allot of drinking water capture during hikes, for up to >week and run a few different systems some are 2x series pump filters. The options for water to process are always widely varied. If I wanted a system for limited volume and simple, reliable filtering; I would go with a Sawyer Mini (and do). The Steripen is not a good solution/system for enjoying shallow water, standing water or water in sub-decent particulate/contaminate condition, its just a biological killer like tablets.

I know this isn't a direct response to your question. I respect your choices, just my 2 cents given your reasoning.
 
Last edited:

hazza

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Aug 19, 2014
Messages
196
At the risk of sounding like a broken record recently, check out the Zebralight H32.

I've not come across many CR123 headlamps, but I gave one of these a try and was very pleased. They also take 16340 lithium ion rechargeables if you want to save some cash on buying tons of CR123s. There are also variants available; H32F has a frosted lens to give a floodier light, H32w has a more neutral light tint, and H32Fw has both features (my favourite). There is also the H302, but this has no lens and produces a very wide flood.

The Zebralight is an aluminium construction, but it is impressively light. You may not need the high modes, but it has a good selection of medium and low modes, not to mention long run times.
 

mrme

Enlightened
Joined
Mar 21, 2003
Messages
372
Location
Houston, TX
Hi mrme,
Curious, have you been a Steripen user and/or are you switching from mechanical filters? I've certainly migrated flashlights to match a headlamp and a minimalistic lantern. I prefer 2xAAA headlamps. I don't have enough favor for the Steripen system to let it drive or direct choices in other pieces in the kit, especially while keeping ultra light. We do allot of drinking water capture during hikes, for up to >week and run a few different systems some are 2x series pump filters. The options for water to process are always widely varied. If I wanted a system for limited volume and simple, reliable filtering; I would go with a Sawyer Mini (and do). The Steripen is not a good solution/system for enjoying shallow water, standing water or water in sub-decent particulate/contaminate condition, its just a biological killer like tablets.

I know this isn't a direct response to your question. I respect your choices, just my 2 cents given your reasoning.

I just got the Steripen and have not had occasion to really use it yet. When I lived in Utah I used to carry a cartridge filter that dropped into a water bottle. The streams were clear and clean, so I just needed something to keep the big nasties out. I really didn't like how much effort it took, but the tasty mountain water stayed tasty.

Now I live in Texas and am starting to work with the Boy Scouts at church. I want to carry a "just in case" water treatment solution. The filters needed to deal with the water here are pretty pricey and not well suited for very occasional use. Iodine has weaknesses I'm sure are obvious enough.

Perhaps with some experience with the Steripen I'll decide to make a micro filter or purifier work. For now the thought of having nothing to maintain with my water treatment beyond carrying a spare set of batteries has me thinking this is the way to go.
 

reppans

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 25, 2007
Messages
4,873
Recently I picked up a Steripen water purifier that uses CR123A lithium batteries, so it would be ideal to have compatible parts. My EDC light uses a CR2, so that would also be a good choice for battery.

If you like your CR2 flashlight, you could use that with an aftermarket headband and you can easily use CR2s in the Steripen (and vice versa if you're in a pinch). I'm a big fan of battery compatibility with camping/travel/emergency gadgets and have consolidated around the AA/Eneloop platform, although I run CRAAs and 14500s in my lights. I can rig my light to run on any battery though - once had a camping partner's light failure put us uncomfortably low on batteries due to wrong battery type - never again ;)

Curious, have you been a Steripen user and/or are you switching from mechanical filters? I've certainly migrated flashlights to match a headlamp and a minimalistic lantern.

I use a Steripen in combination with a Sawyer Mini - somewhat redundant, but mechanicals don't filter out viruses and I don't like to mess with my water. I save weight, though, by using my primary flashlight for all illumination needs with a DIY walletable lantern diffuser and "neck-lamp" cord.
 
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