AAA powered LED - when is the next leap in tech?

Wurkkos

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I almost bought a Fenix E01, but then I realized that it has been out ay least 2 years, correct? So, seems like the next generation shpuld be. Right around the courner, right? Nichia GS is the current LED, correct? Is that new or 2 years old? So, maybe I don't need to worry about the flashlight being an older model, if they keep upgrading the LED.
 

RyanA

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Well you could look at some of the current generation of aaa lights using high power leds. Most use cree xr-e's b but in that size I'd think something smaller would be preferable. There are some using rebels and cree xp-e. I haven't heard much about whats coming down the pipe. There's some word of a cree xp-g and I thought I saw that nichia had a few leds that were very efficient around 550ma.:shrug:

Here's where I first heard about the nicha's
https://www.candlepowerforums.com/threads/226547

I think there's a thread about the xp-g right in this sub forum.
 
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Dances with Flashlight

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I have no idea what improvements might be expected from the 5mm LED's. It seems to me that greatest incremental LED technologies have been centered around the higher performance emitters - the P4's and P7's, K-2's, Rebels, etc. Because these perform as such higher levels than the 5mm's, I wonder whether there is any economic reason for further 5mm development.
 

Marduke

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Because these perform as such higher levels than the 5mm's, I wonder whether there is any economic reason for further 5mm development.

Well, when you can easily buy several hundred for the price of a single high flux emitter, they are sticking around for a while longer.

But to answer the question, the GS is still on the top end of 5mm's. You can get more efficient with under driving high flux emitters, but not for anywhere near $15 for a complete light.
 

RyanA

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Peak Eiger looks interesting.
When will we likely get a review here?

Probably soon, check the Peak sub-forum frequently. I know some have already been ordered:party:. I think it's a winner, prices are good, customer service is excellent. I am also excited about the TIR type optic. I think that this will likely lead to slightly improved optical efficiency over a reflectored light. There's a bit of debate over optical efficiency with TIR vs Reflectors. So this is just my opinion. Though I don't foresee any problems with the product (It seems like a safe and logical next step for the Matterhorn series of lights). I am waiting for a review as well.:popcorn:
 

blasterman

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Well, when you can easily buy several hundred for the price of a single high flux emitter, they are sticking around for a while longer.

A more acurate comment would be that you can solder and wire those hundreds of 5mm LEDs together with cheap Asian labor for pretty cheap. Lets call it what it is.

A can get a bare, Cree neutral white XR-E emitter for $5.00. I've been buying older Crees on fire sales for as low $1.00. So, how many 5mm LEDs of the equivelant light quality would be required to reach the same lumen level of a XR-E and how much would it cost shipped to the U.S.? I'm also talking about 5mm emitters of reputed quality - not bins of jewelry class LEDs sold for a couple of pennies from Crazy Achmed on Ebay.

You then have to wire those 5mm LEDs in goofy parallel/series strings that as soon as one LED barfs you lose entire strings in a slow cascade. So, the cost effectiveness of the 5mm LEDs doesn't seem to jive, unless you're an Asian factory worker, a marketeer for Walmart type stores selling junk, or a 9yr old that likes blinking jewelry. They make nice yard lights as well :huh:
 

spencer

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I would say that the LF2XT is a leap forward in UI for a AAA light. It uses a new LED (XP-E) but it is no more efficient than anything being used in any other light.
 

Calina

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The next leap in tech for AAA lights could very well be the AAA itself. In two or three years I wouldn't be surprised to see batteries with twice the capacity or more. As far as the LEDs themselves are concerned, I don't expect anything more than small increments in brightness within the same period of time.
 

matrixshaman

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Would you all say the LF2XT is a leap forward in tech for AAA's?

Considering some of it's features I'd say yes. In fact there is NO light in any battery format that has some of the features of the LF2XT. Just one thing that quickly comes to mind is the built in voltmeter accurate to 0.01 volts. It's one of the few if not only MCU controlled AAA light. The only AAA I know of using a unique silent switch similar to a piston drive in some ways. It's one of the few using an XP-E although I expect that will change quickly. I'm guessing here but probably a very good guess to say it has more features than any other AAA. Maybe not a big leap for Liteflux but a considerable upgrade from their LF2X AAA unit.
 

EntropyQ3

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Considering some of it's features I'd say yes. In fact there is NO light in any battery format that has some of the features of the LF2XT. Just one thing that quickly comes to mind is the built in voltmeter accurate to 0.01 volts. It's one of the few if not only MCU controlled AAA light. The only AAA I know of using a unique silent switch similar to a piston drive in some ways. It's one of the few using an XP-E although I expect that will change quickly. I'm guessing here but probably a very good guess to say it has more features than any other AAA. Maybe not a big leap for Liteflux but a considerable upgrade from their LF2X AAA unit.

The LF2XT is certainly a technically advanced flashlight. However, the entire point of using an AAA cell in the first place is to achieve compact dimensions. Otherwise you could be using an AA cell with 2.5 times the capacity, not to mention the A123 lithium option. And in terms of size the LF2XT is a step backwards. In fact, it is almost exactly the same dimensions as the NiteCore EZAA. (length 8.1 vs 8.3, width 1.4 vs 1.5 cm weight 21.1 vs 21.6 g) It is considerably larger, heavier (and more expensive) than the Fenix LOD-q4/LD01 products. Of course, if you bring usability and value into the equation, products such as the Fenix E01 and a host of other alternatives spring to mind.

The LF2XT is a delightful light for someone who likes a very portable light-toy. ;) And hand on heart, that describes quite a few of us here at CandlePowerForums, me included. But to describe it as the pinnacle of AAA flashlight development would be too arrogant, I feel, since arguably it has lost the one property that justifies use of AAA cells in the first place, the compact size. And if the yardstick is useability/$....

It's a very good horse for its particular course, but in this world of mixed metaphores, there are more ways to skin a cat.
 

kaichu dento

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Would you all say the LF2XT is a leap forward in tech for AAA's?
I'd call it a big leap forward, but there are many things to consider...
The LF2XT is certainly a technically advanced flashlight. However, the entire point of using an AAA cell in the first place is to achieve compact dimensions....in terms of size the LF2XT is a step backwards. In fact, it is almost exactly the same dimensions as the NiteCore EZAA. (length 8.1 vs 8.3, width 1.4 vs 1.5 cm weight 21.1 vs 21.6 g) It is considerably larger, heavier (and more expensive) than the Fenix LOD-q4/LD01 products.

The LF2XT is a delightful light for someone who likes a very portable light-toy. ;) And hand on heart, that describes quite a few of us here at CandlePowerForums, me included. But to describe it as the pinnacle of AAA flashlight development would be too arrogant, I feel, since arguably it has lost the one property that justifies use of AAA cells in the first place, the compact size. And if the yardstick is useability/$....
I just put my LF2XT, L0D and EZAA next to each other and don't see the LF2XT as being considerably larger than the L0D, or almost as big as the EZAA so much as aproximately right in the middle, size-wise. For me it is in no way a step backwards except for those who value size above all else, in which case I love my Arc-P and EZAA w! However, when all things are balanced out I am definitely replacing my L0D's with the LF2XT.

For me the only reason to buy an E01 would be if price and size were the most important factors. Myself, I would rather buy a used Arc-P for $15-$30 in the MarketPlace rather than a new E01. I like the tint better and the smoothness of the beam, and also the tininess and perfect knurling.

Another point about the LF2XT being too large, that's what Drakes are for! :naughty:
 

Curt R

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The Eiger uses a Rebel 0100 bin because it can be driven harder than the Cree do to it's higher heat tolerance in such a small package. The Rebel LED also has many different color options. With a 10440 or 10280 battery the Rebel can be driven at 380 mA for a 100 Lumen output in an Arc sized package. 80 Lumens with 2 Alkaline AAAs and 45 Lumens with a single AAA Lithium.

Curt
 

regulator

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Or the XP-G, which is quite impressive in person... :whistle:

This will definately be a reason for me to buy a new light - even if it is the exact same model of my favorite. I love small efficient lights that provide several hours of good general output light (5-20 lumens) and great runtime at very low outputs. This LED will be a nice improvement to these smaller lights with limited capacity batteries.

BTW - I should be receiving my Eiger today. I purchased the light because it is a little different than my other lights and I like the concept. It is a simple basic light that is very small (one of the main reasons of purchasing it) and hopefully efficient for the amount of light that it provides. I got a #4 power level which should offer a good balance between runtime and output for an AAA light.
 
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2xTrinity

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I've owned at some point every Liteflux LF2 variant ever released. I like the LF2s because of the high frequency PWM (no apparent flicker), native support for 10440, and most importantly direct access to a LOW low, and a high high mode. I set them up as a 2-stage twisty with 0.2%/100% LO/HI then forgot about most of the features.

Now with the piston drive input however, the extra features are actually usable. I have disabled mode memory so the light always starts at 0.2%. Click and hold gives momentary maximum output. Double-tap cycles through various output levels (0.2% -> 1% -> 5% -> 22% -> 66%) without ever encountering any strobe modes. 5 taps to see check battery voltage under load in any particular output mode. My favorite interface in any light to date, by far.

The LF2XT is certainly a technically advanced flashlight. However, the entire point of using an AAA cell in the first place is to achieve compact dimensions. Otherwise you could be using an AA cell with 2.5 times the capacity, not to mention the A123 lithium option. And in terms of size the LF2XT is a step backwards. In fact, it is almost exactly the same dimensions as the NiteCore EZAA. (length 8.1 vs 8.3, width 1.4 vs 1.5 cm weight 21.1 vs 21.6 g) It is considerably larger, heavier (and more expensive) than the Fenix LOD-q4/LD01 products. Of course, if you bring usability and value into the equation, products such as the Fenix E01 and a host of other alternatives spring to mind.
Well, if you want to get 2.5x the capacity by using AA, AND still have all the comparable features, you'd need to switch to a Nitecore D10 (which I also have), or Liteflux LF5XT--both of which are substantailly larger than the Nitecore EZ-AA. The unloaded weight is also kind of a moot point, as even in the case of the 'heavy' LF2XT, the cell still outweighs the host. In the case of the EZ-AA, the vast majority of the weight will be from the cell. A fully loaded AA light, while ok for pants pocket carry, is a bit heavy for shirt pocket or keychain carry, where weight is as much an issue as size.

My usual solution is to carry a good AAA light on my person at all times, to cover those situations where quick burst of light is all that's needed. Also, on low the AAA provides more than enough runtime (days). If I need both high output and runtime, I usually have a whole stash of other lights (as well as plenty of spare cells) in in my backpack - which is generally nearby if not actually on my back. Of course, all those arguments still didn't prevent me from ordering a EZ-AA yesterday :eek:.
 
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regulator

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This is all very preliminary and I plan on doing some more tests, but the new Peak Eiger appears to be more efficient than the Liteflux LF2X Q5 (at least at a medium/lower output setting). The LF2X has variable output but I think this may come at the cost of efficiency.

The Rebel Eiger uses (I believe) a simple constant current drive circuit which is said to be more efficient that the PWM circuits used in multi-level lights. I am not sure but maybe the lower forward voltage requirement of the Rebel LED comes into play when the light output is at a lower level as well. Much of this is based on lower drive levels with a #4 level Eiger that pulls between 160 - 190 ma from the AAA battery. I will post further findings.


BTW - I performed an unscientific runtime comparisons between the LF2X and a Fenix LOD Q4 with a cheap alkaline (at a medium output setting) and found runtimes to be similar. I considered the Fenix to be one of the better and relatively efficient AAA lights. Again, this is all very unscientific but so far I am pleased with performance of the Peak Eiger lights.
 
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