Adaptive headlights approved for the US!

Wurkkos

John_Galt

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It isn't just Tesla drivers. I have a long-time friend who finds the nifty safety features of his CRV particularly useful for helping him to all but not have to drive on the highway. And this is what my earlier point was- these systems become a crutch that is not enhancing the drivers attention, or aiding in their safe decision making when driving. It is effectively replacing certain portions of their responsibility, not by design, but by their abuse of such systems. His attention at highway speeds is not enhanced by the lane centering system or adaptive cruise control, he uses those systems to cruise while watching movies to his phone suction cupped to the windshield. His major complaints about these systems, so far, are that they often don't work very well on broad turns along the roads he drives, where they might panic brake because they see vehicles in other lanes and respond to those, despite them not being at risk of being hit.

There is no way that he is an example of a safer driver on the road than someone driving a completely safety-monitor free vehicle, who actually sits and accomplishes the tasks associated with driving their vehicle.

The sole reason I whinge on about the invasion of privacy and further effective loss of rights, is because the people who are nominally charged with writing these regulations within the limits of Constitutionality have clearly stopped paying any attention to these documents.

[Rule violation removed by moderator—you know better, John.] As I said, typical.
 
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-Virgil-

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We hear about Tesla's automation failing because it's novel
...more because Elon Musk's mouth/keyboard keeps writing checks his cars can't even come close to cashing, and he keeps flipping the bird to safety regulators around the world, and people are dying as a result.
 

-Virgil-

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It isn't just Tesla drivers. I have a long-time friend who finds the nifty safety features of his CRV particularly useful for helping him to all but not have to drive on the highway. And this is what my earlier point was- these systems become a crutch that is not enhancing the drivers attention, or aiding in their safe decision making when driving. It is effectively replacing certain portions of their responsibility, not by design, but by their abuse of such systems. His attention at highway speeds is not enhanced by the lane centering system or adaptive cruise control, he uses those systems to cruise while watching movies to his phone suction cupped to the windshield. His major complaints about these systems, so far, are that they often don't work very well on broad turns along the roads he drives, where they might panic brake because they see vehicles in other lanes and respond to those, despite them not being at risk of being hit.

There is no way that he is an example of a safer driver on the road than someone driving a completely safety-monitor free vehicle, who actually sits and accomplishes the tasks associated with driving their vehicle.

The sole reason I whinge on about the invasion of privacy and further effective loss of rights, is because the people who are nominally charged with writing these regulations within the limits of Constitutionality have clearly stopped paying any attention to these documents.

And this has...what to do with headlamps, adaptive or otherwise?
 

turbodog

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Reminded of a fellow at the local makerspace - a veteran woodworker - who hated the sawstop table saw. Would rant about nanny-state this and the weak-minded and -willed who would suffer such a thing. Would always use the old-school Delta that had no such safety device.

Then one day he severed most of a thumb using the Delta in the blink of an eye. I don't know if he defends the moral superiority of bad outcomes arrived at via absolute freedom of action with as much passion these days.

To be fair, the sawstop system is imperfect. For every user that nearly nicked themselves on the sawstop, it's tripped at least five times due to moisture in the wood or other means of conduction that tripped the safety. This does mean installing another ~$60 safety cartridge and having the retracted blade repaired for $20 - $30. But even with >1,000 largely amateur users this seems to only be an every-other-month issue.

I sold my table saw and bought a sawstop after getting a wake up call a couple years ago. Don't mind it one bit either.

It's no _replacement_ for awareness and good sense, but it's a very nice _compliment_ to them.
 

turbodog

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Adaptive headlamps are one thing, but the topic here is the "adaptive driving beam" (ADB), which is a whole 'nother thing entirely. Yes, Lexus calls the swiveling low beams on the LS430 "ADB" but it's not "ADB". ADB is, essentially, an always-on high beam that selectively masks portions of the beam so as to not blind other drivers (whether oncoming or preceding).

So how is this better? If the filament/emitter dies... now you have no light on that side?
 

-Virgil-

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So how is this better?

ADB gives about 100 extra feet of seeing distance compared to low beam, but without extra glare. That is a huge safety advantage; low beams (even very good ones, properly aimed) do not give adequate seeing distance.

If the filament/emitter dies... now you have no light on that side?

Filaments aren't involved in ADB; multiple LEDs are.

I can't make head or tail of your question here. Cars are packed with parts that can fail, but usually don't. Every headlamp ever made gives no light if it fails; this is not some new safety threat.
 

Alaric Darconville

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So how is this better?
Like -Virgil- points out-- about 100 extra feet of seeing distance. At 70mph, that's about 1 extra second of seeing distance than before.

If the filament/emitter dies... now you have no light on that side?
Filament? This is done with arrays of LEDs on each side. Besides, we've driven for YEARS with the problem that if a bulb fails we lose the high or low beam function on that side (and rarely, but potentially, both-- if it's a dual-filament bulb and fails in a particular way).
 

turbodog

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After having both low & high fail on both sides of my moving truck once... that sort of leaves an impression on someone.
 

Alaric Darconville

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After having both low & high fail on both sides of my moving truck once... that sort of leaves an impression on someone.
Another reason just because you've got great headlamps doesn't mean you should be driving as fast at night as you would in the day. And remember that a motorcyclist typically is already at a "half the performance of an automotive headlighting system" disadvantage and can have that one headlamp fail entirely (which can be fairly likely given motorcycle headlamps are generally always on, and the amount of jolts and vibration the lamps take).

But we can't sit there paralyzed thinking our headlamps are going to fail every time we drive. Nor can we play Devil's Advocate all the time trying to conjure these "what if" situations. This reads like argument for the sake of argument.
 

ameli0rate

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poor decision making at 80mph should result in severe consequences
Hmm. My comments were included in the quote.. weird. (ok, looks like I got it now)

I've jokingly said that all cars should have a 6" spike mounted to the steering wheel. That might urge drivers to exercise some caution.

I do like safety features, but ideally I prefer a great mass-transit system where far fewer people NEED to drive when they had a few drinks, went to a party or need to get home from the airport.

Hop on a train, get on the subway, take the bus. That eliminates traffic, makes it easier to drive for those who HAVE to, etc. etc.

Of course, maybe that means there are more deer on the roads for the remaining drivers as not as many get clipped and taken out of circulation. :D
 

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