Any headlamps out there that does not use an electronic switch?

Wurkkos

Illum

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Seems like the mechanically switched headlamps have went extinct and the ones remaining uses reed switches and pushes $100+
I was looking at the Surefire Saint but seems like that's the only option in the market. Any recommendations?
 

dougie

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The Saint has also gone extinct since it is no longer offered for sale by Surefire. The Surefire Minimus and Maximus are the only obvious options that I'm aware of at the present time but I'd be very surprised if they were the only ones?
 

uk_caver

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What's the precise meaning of 'mechanical switch'?

Is it a switch with a 1:1 mapping between different positions and different outputs/beamshapes (like a rotary switch in a Petzl Pixa3 or Ultra)?
 

Illum

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What's the precise meaning of 'mechanical switch'?

Is it a switch with a 1:1 mapping between different positions and different outputs/beamshapes (like a rotary switch in a Petzl Pixa3 or Ultra)?

A switch that locks out the batteries, where the headlamp can be tossed in a box, bag, duffle, or car and not have to worry about changing out batteries for the next two or three years. A mechanical switch differs from an electronic switch in that turning a device off using an electronic switch essentially puts the controller in "standby mode" or "off mode" while a small current draw [quiescent current/ parasitic drain] remains. A mechanical switch breaks the circuit entirely, what the battery sees is an open circuit.

I had a H50 Q5 years ago, lost it, now eagerly trying to find another one.
 
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uk_caver

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I'd probably draw the lines elsewhere - between insignificant drain and significant drain and then making some estimate of ease of accidental activation (which seems to be rather a continuum).

The last caving light insert I made is permanently powered, but has an 'off' drain of <100nA. That's something under 1mAh/year, vastly less than any attached cells are going to self-discharge. As it happens, it's an insert for a Duo, where the switch does have a mechanical lock.

There's nothing to stop an 'electronic' switch having a mechanical lock, though for the ubiquitous pushbutton it's probably more likely that something like a recessed button or a strong spring would be used to significantly reduce accidental turn-ons, rather than a catch used to eliminate them completely.

I do see your point - my main headtorches are ones where I can either lock the switch out, or where they have a switch that's fairly resistant to accidental activation and I where can unplug the battery pack in the box if I want to be sure they can't get turned on (and where reconnection is very quick and easy even in the dark), and I probably would lock them off or disconnect the battery if I was expecting to leave them for an extended time.
And my backup headtorch is a Q5 H50.
 

Bolster

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Zebralight h50 might be avaible used.

And this is the very reason I'd not sell my two H50s -- they get use for travel, where they won't turn on by accident. Yes you CAN unscrew more modern ZLs, but one Bolster has been known to forget to do that, and basically cooked an H501 with a pocket-switch.
 

RNDDUDE

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If you want to keep the batteries in the unit and guarantee no current draw, put a piece of masking tape over one end of the battery before you store it away. This will work with any battery driven device.
 

Esko

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A switch that locks out the batteries, where the headlamp can be tossed in a box, bag, duffle, or car and not have to worry about changing out batteries for the next two or three years.

Zebralight claims that it would take 12 years (h600) or 16 years (h51/h502) for parasitic drain to empty a full battery (if we don't count the battery self discharge). And of course, there is still the tailcap lock-out option, too. Not good enough?
 

uk_caver

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Personally, if I was packing something with cells in for transit, for a tube-based device like a flashlight, I'd go for a plastic isolation disc (cut from the kind of packaging often welded around electronic goods) to avoid issues of tape residue, or springs potentially piercing through the tape as a cap is screwed on.

Though for a 2-cell device (at least with AA NiMH/Alkaline), I'd possibly just turn one of the cells around, especially for an electronic device which I knew couldn't draw meaningful current from minimal voltage.
 
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Illum

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Zebralight claims that it would take 12 years (h600) or 16 years (h51/h502) for parasitic drain to empty a full battery (if we don't count the battery self discharge). And of course, there is still the tailcap lock-out option, too. Not good enough?

I'm holding off on the new Zebralights until they get their act together about waterproofing, but their headlamps are already on the consideration list. The UI is kind of excessive. If its for me then its fine, the headlight is mainly for dad. Anything that requires clicking a button several times he pretty much disregards them. He's probably the only person I know who never used a cellphone, seldom touch the remote control, and when we visit other peoples houses, he bypasses the door bell and resorts to hard knocking.
 

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