Anyone interested in Windows 7?

orbital

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.....
I also heard that Windows 7 will check your installed third-party software for stuff that needs updating, a la the Secunia checkups I keep mentioning. If that's true, then it'll be a very timely feature.

Anything else I might know, I wouldn't be allowed to discuss yet due to my NDA agreement :tinfoil:

+

With all due respect mech, and your position;

Unless I could turn OFF the licensed 'Secunia' feature,....
I cant' imagine an app. I would want less.
The potential of constant accessing the internet to check for updates & unnecessary Processes running....NO THANKS!

The first this I do with software is to turn OFF its ability to 'check for updates'.

**When I see a security issue with ms, it usually has to do with a Service I'v already Disabled anyway.
Really not interested in a new OS with excessive Process/Services running, and 'made for idiots' security features.

Have to +1 NA8s last comments.
 

mechBgon

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+

With all due respect mech, and your position;

Unless I could turn OFF the licensed 'Secunia' feature,....
I cant' imagine an app. I would want less.
The potential of constant accessing the internet to check for updates & unnecessary Processes running....NO THANKS!

The first this I do with software is to turn OFF its ability to 'check for updates'.

**When I see a security issue with ms, it usually has to do with a Service I'v already Disabled anyway.
Really not interested in a new OS with excessive Process/Services running, and 'made for idiots' security features.

Have to +1 NA8s last comments.

So what you're trying to say, is...

opinion.png


:crackup:
 

HarryN

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Holepuncher - I have an HP business laptop with Vista business that came with 1 gig I think and it was ok / slow, but taking it to 4 gig made it really run well. Crucial.com (micron's marketing arm) is great for adding ram. It is so cheap there is no excuse - I am sure your boss would go for it - just show him this thread.

Interestingly, my daughters macbook also came with 1 gig - but could only be upgraded to 2 gig. This also made a big difference.

I do have a number of aps open at the same time though. Usually opera for email, IE for browser, word, excel and sometimes ACT at the same time with carbonite running to backup.

For those who like the XP interface, I generally agree - It is easy to just set things to use the XP interface instead of the Vista GUI. I am still unsure of why people like the new mac / vista front ends - maybe it makes them more the same ?

I will say that Vista forced me to re-think how I managed my computer management. Pretty much I went from being at least partially in control to feeling similar to NA8 - you really are not in control of Vista - perhaps unless you are a pretty high level IT person. This means that I accept (reluctantly) that anything I type or read on this thing is now an open book. I don't like it, but it is reality - and also true for most OS's AFAIK. Once I accepted that big brother was going to hack my computer, then I did not have to worry about wifi passwords and encryption anymore as this was the only reason to do that anyway.

I did break down and get the Microsoft one care package this year. I was doing ok without it, but since I have to fix my own computer problems and run my business, it is handy to offload some work to someone else. It seems to be reasonably good at stopping virus / worm problems.
 
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mechBgon

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This means that I accept (reluctantly) that anything I type or read on this thing is now an open book. I don't like it, but it is reality - and also true for most OS's AFAIK. Once I accepted that big brother was going to hack my computer, then I did not have to worry about wifi passwords and encryption anymore as this was the only reason to do that anyway.

Nothing escapes a packet sniffer placed between the computer and the Internet, so if a backdoor were sending info somewhere, it would've been discovered by now :candle: Besides, I'm sure the government has already put us all in the "benign flashlight addict" category :p

For gosh sakes, do use encryption on your wireless network, no matter what OS you run. Use WPA2 encryption if possible, but anything is better than nothing. Also use your router's MAC-address list to allow only your computers to access your wireless. You don't want someone pirating your wifi, for one thing.

If anyone needs help with that, start with your router's owner manual, which should cover the use of encryption and the MAC-address allow/deny list.
 
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HarryN

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. You don't want someone pirating your wifi, for one thing.

.

Hi MechBgon - I hear this all of the time and have thought through the reasoning. BTW - I don't claim any expertise at all here, this is just MHO and probably ill informed.

So - what is the REAL risk of having an open WiFi for a home user ? The reason I ask, is that it seems to me that open WiFi access in general is a good thing. There are plenty of times it would be handy to just get a quick free on-line info on something and I support that concept in general.

What is the downside (for me specifically).

a) If someone uses the acess a LOT, it slows down my DSL connection. I tested this against what happens every day when school lets out - the DSL speed drops off more than 50% anyway - even with no router in place, so the main loss of speed is not from other users, but from just simple phone company capacity limits.

b) Someone could intercept my web surfing. Someone already does and they gain the fantastic info that I am on CPF and a few other forums and read the news. No loss there.

c) E Mail interception. Our email is already intercepted many times, stored, combed, and ignored. This is true for just about everyone in the world now. For the next level down of interception, I just use email specific encryption.

d) Music Downloads. I didn't do it, so I am not guilty. If I did do it, then it would be hard for them to prove it since my wifi is open to anyone.

e) I disconnect my computers from the router when not in active use and have active firewalls via MS Vista Business.

I can see how the DSL / Cable companies hate it, as they have to pay for connections and want to sell me mobile internet access (which I actually also use from sprint) but where is any of this my problem ?

Please don't say "a terrorist might use your connection to plot something". Fear is not a good reason to give up freedom.
 

mechBgon

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Hi MechBgon - I hear this all of the time and have thought through the reasoning. BTW - I don't claim any expertise at all here, this is just MHO and probably ill informed.

So - what is the REAL risk of having an open WiFi for a home user ? The reason I ask, is that it seems to me that open WiFi access in general is a good thing. There are plenty of times it would be handy to just get a quick free on-line info on something and I support that concept in general.

What is the downside (for me specifically).

a) If someone uses the acess a LOT, it slows down my DSL connection. I tested this against what happens every day when school lets out - the DSL speed drops off more than 50% anyway - even with no router in place, so the main loss of speed is not from other users, but from just simple phone company capacity limits.

b) Someone could intercept my web surfing. Someone already does and they gain the fantastic info that I am on CPF and a few other forums and read the news. No loss there.

c) E Mail interception. Our email is already intercepted many times, stored, combed, and ignored. This is true for just about everyone in the world now. For the next level down of interception, I just use email specific encryption.

d) Music Downloads. I didn't do it, so I am not guilty. If I did do it, then it would be hard for them to prove it since my wifi is open to anyone.

e) I disconnect my computers from the router when not in active use and have active firewalls via MS Vista Business.

I can see how the DSL / Cable companies hate it, as they have to pay for connections and want to sell me mobile internet access (which I actually also use from sprint) but where is any of this my problem ?

Please don't say "a terrorist might use your connection to plot something". Fear is not a good reason to give up freedom.

Loss of speed, violation of your terms of service, some potential for worm attack, and possibly being left holding the bag as the apparent downloader of child porn. Those are some superficial reasons. It may also be illegal to access someone's wifi without permission, even if they didn't try to restrict access... many people simply have no idea it can or should be done.

Want some more reasons not to let just anyone onto your network? How about:

Those are just the ones that come to mind right off the top of my head. Best practices can protect you from stuff you'd probably never dream of.


*On that last topic, I do suggest giving your router and modem strong passwords to the configuration panels, in place of the factory-default passwords, and updating the firmware to the current version. And disable Universal Plug 'n Play (uPNP) if it is enabled on either the router or modem, unless you need uPNP for something.
 
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asdalton

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Yeah, I definitely wouldn't buy any argument that goes, "Well, some uberhacker or the FBI could have a backdoor through my security systems ... therefore I won't use any security at all!"

A professional car thief can steal your car if he really wants to, but you still take your keys with you and lock the doors. The purpose is to deter the less skilled crooks, and to make sure you're not the low-hanging fruit.
 

NA8

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The problem is if you're not being paid big bucks to sit around all day learning about this stuff, you probably aren't keeping up.

Anyone have the percentages of computers in the USA that run "security wise" simply as booted up the first day home from the store ?

By the way, was it true some Chinese military person was quoted as saying "If we attack America, we'll reach out and switch off your infrastructure first." ? There is substantial risk involved with this stuff when dealing with opponents smarter, more motivated, and better funded than the bored, hungover, staff at M$ and Intel.
 
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HarryN

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Switching back to the original topic of Win 7 and upgrades, I have a specific question.

I am currently running an HP business laptop 6515B with an AMD Turion 64x2 and 4 gig ram (maxed out).

OS is Vista Business but running 32 bit mode. I did this because I did not know what I am doing and was actually planning to go back to XP originally after testing Vista.

Typical applications are office 2003 (no plan for 2007), ACT, Opera (email), IE and some add ons, built in wifi )kind of marginal but works), sprint G3 USB data card, carbonite backup service, win live onecare, and cardscan. Printing is either via a USB printer or a wireless HP network multifunction printer we have. (major driver size)

I am planning to add some more OCR capability in 2009 and it looks like we will be doing more digital camera stuff as well.

We don't play many games on it, but my son does like to play one on- line game that really pushes the system (based on cpu fan coming on hard)

We watched one movie using it the other day, but normally I don't even use the DVD writer - at all.

I run with 5 user accounts and 1 admin for - admin use of course. :grin2:

In general I am happy with Vista but there are some nagging questions:

a) Would I be better off running the Vista 64 bit version with this setup than the 32 bit version running now ? In other words, since the hardware is 64 bit and the OS is 32 bit, is this slowing me down ?

b) Will Win 7 help me
- run faster ?
- Print faster ?
- Startup faster from cold or sleep mode ?
- Use less memory for the same applications running ?

I figure with all of the pro IT advice on security I am getting here, maybe you guys can answer the 32 vs 64 bit OS question intelligently.

Thanks a lot.

Harry
 

mechBgon

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In general I am happy with Vista but there are some nagging questions:

a) Would I be better off running the Vista 64 bit version with this setup than the 32 bit version running now ? In other words, since the hardware is 64 bit and the OS is 32 bit, is this slowing me down ?

I think 64-bit is preferable for three main reasons, as long as you don't have peripherals and hardware that have no 64-bit drivers available. You can use all 4GB+ of your RAM, 64-bit has a few additional security features (especially against rootkits), and you can use 64-bit versions of programs like Photoshop or whatnot.

But I doubt 32-bit is "slowing you down" in general, unless there's a 64-bit version of one of your programs that would be faster than the equivalent 32-bit version. That may or may not be the case.
 
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