Arc AAA Internal Construction

Empath

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Nov 11, 2001
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Oregon
While demonstrating to a co-worker my Arc AAA, I opened it to show him the simple power source. Upon opening it, I noticed the rubber washer had come unglued from the head and stayed in the barrel with the battery. I seem to be able to operate okay with the washer loose between the battery and head, but I'm wondering how one goes about re-attaching it to the head without risking damage from glues, etc.
 

ikendu

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Jun 30, 2001
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Iowa
Mine came unglued as well.

I ended up returning the unit to ARC for flickering. I think that glue may have gotten all over the battery contact (and dried). I had tried cleaning it, but it still flickered. When I returned it (still haven't gotten it back) the mfg. commented that it was a really early design (although I just got it). So...maybe recent samples are better glued. One person on this forum commented that his seemed to be glued on TIGHT-ly. Maybe a newer model?

Good luck!
 

Darell

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Nov 14, 2001
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LOCO is more like it.
The new ones are damn near impossible to remove. Just having the gasket loose shouldn't effect the performance in the least, however. It is more convient if it stays stuck to the head though...
 

Gransee

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Jan 26, 2001
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Mesa, AZ. USA
Darell is right. We change the glue awhile back to make it stick better.

Btw, the contractor that supplies the "foam" does most of their business with aerospace and the military. The "foam" comes in two stickness grades and they assumed that since we were civilian we wanted the less sticky version. Once I found out about the stickier version, we quickly switched to it. It does require more skill in assembly though because once you stick it- it's committed. Hehehe (mad laugh)...
smile.gif


Peter Gransee
 

Darell

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Nov 14, 2001
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LOCO is more like it.
Since I've been dissecting (well, really just trying to modify my solder blob) one of my AAA's, I had need to remove one of those mil-spec foams. A little heat from a heat gun worked wonders. Just pull slowly, all the way around, it it'll come right off, and re-stick very well. They are possible to remove, but I'm pretty sure they won't come off unless you want them too. Just don't put it on your workbench face-down
frown.gif


Peter - BTW, I still think the best O-ring seating position is achieved with ZERO (or very near zero) solder blob.
 

Darell

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Nov 14, 2001
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LOCO is more like it.
Excellent sleuthing. When the foam was lost, and it worked only when screwed down really tight, I began to realize how the story would turn out...
 

bluegreen

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Joined
Oct 21, 2001
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96
Location
Flintshire, UK
A friend of mine whom I had bought an Arc-AAA for came back to me a few weeks later saying that his light had stopped working. On examining the head I noted that he had lost the foam ring - he said that he had let his girlfriend borrow the light and he found it stopped working the next time he used it. Perhaps she had lost the ring...

It only wanted to turn on when the head was screwed on really tight. It seemed quite odd and I thought about testing Mr G's warranty service, when on comparing his Arc with mine my friend saw that the bottom of his battery container seemed quite dirty. Maybe it was corrosion or something.

Using my Arc to peer into his battery container we discovered the location of the missing foam ring! It seems that it had fallen off and his girlfriend, not knowing what it was for or what to do with it, had just rammed it in the most obvious place.

It was quickly retrieved using a wire in a small hook and reglued using Evostick. He hasn't had any problems since - though he doesn't lend it to his gilrfriend anymore!
 
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