Are CR2 flashlights a dying breed?

Tixx

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Well, I would agree, a Zebralight CR2 will probably never ever happen. It's just a nice pipedream. I've been waiting for the XM-L2 SC32w since forever and even thought they've been promising such a beast for a very long time it still hasn't happened. Still, they claim it is pending soon (again), so we may yet see one.
Is that the CR123 flashlight? It did take a while to reintroduce the Headlamp CR123 again.
 

EZO

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Is that the CR123 flashlight? It did take a while to reintroduce the Headlamp CR123 again.

Yes, the SC32 is a one cell CR123 light, basically a sort of cut down SC52. They've been promising the SC32 and SC32W for several years now. At one point the SC32 disappeared from their Google doc spreadsheet for quite awhile so I thought it was probably dead, but then it reappeared with a projected release date of 10/2014, which then never happened. Of course, their product release dates are from some other "Zebra-time" dimension which is often several months (or more) later in CPF real-world time. Interestingly, the SC32 is now listed for release in 1/2015 which I figure means March, April or May.
 

EZO

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It is interesting to see Foursevens introduce a Bolt Action CR2 flashlight. However one may feel about this flashlight it seems that Foursevens is single handedly keeping the CR2 battery format alive one way or another. Of course, most reactions to the light, including mine are quite negative because of the apparent impracticality of using two such batteries in a light of this nature. At 490 lumens, the light does pack quite a punch though and it features fairly decent run time which probably accounts for the cell choice, but still. The upcoming Zebralight 400+ lumen single AA SC5 XM-L2 would seem a more appealing option.

The bolt action is interesting though and it could be an interesting concept to see a single cell version of a bolt action CR2 but with the bolt up front, activated with the thumb.
 
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BillSWPA

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The FourSevens bolt action light is the first multi-cell CR2 light I have seen. Because all of my current and likely future CR2 lights as well as my one CR2 powered camera are all single cell, I can safely buy less expensive CR2 cells knowing that the hazards of mismatched cells in series will never be an issue. With a multi-cell light, one should likely plan to spend a bit more on their CR2 cells, and buy cells that is known to retain their charge consistently with time. I would likely buy the FourSevens brand CR2 cells if I owned. a bolt action light.
 

RedLED

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CR2 are my favorite sized lights and I, too would love a clicky. I think when someone developes the technology to keep it the same size as an Aeon, and still with a split ring that would be a winner. A CR2 version of Oveready's low res. brass switch could be designed down to fit a CR2 platform.

I have back up Aeons and a back up Ti 47's MiNi still I it's box. And I have the Ti Surefire Titan. These are my favorite CR2's, however, I do look for some of the other great models that were built.

I am am afraid we are in the post CR2 era, the Golden age of CR2 lights has past, and I really hope there can be a comeback of these lights.
 
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RedLED

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As you can see in the photo comparing Ra Twisties above, the CR2 size doesn't really save much size in the HDS/Ra flashlights :eek:[/QUOTE

When did RA make a CR2?
 

KuroNekko

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I apologize for the grave-digging, but this thread is the latest one regarding CR2 flashlights. Most others on CPF are from 2005 to 2009.
However, the years since the CR2's were discussed have revealed their fate. CR2 flashlights are nearly extinct, especially with smaller Li-ion 10180 keychain lights hitting the market more recently. Between 10180's with built-in MicroUSB recharging and the more powerful CR123/16340 flashlights, looks like the industry has closed the door on CR2-based lights. However, I own a CR2 flashlight so I had some concerns.

I recently researched on CPF and elsewhere about RCR2 options for my 4Sevens Mini MLR2 G2. I had bought the flashlight years ago when I got a bunch of CR2 primary batteries for free. Given the battery supply, I figured to get a flashlight for my collection that runs on them. While my primary supply is healthy (though getting old), I wanted to switch to RCR2 once they were done. My research showed there are 15266 and 15270 Li-ions, but some that used to be available years ago no longer are. For example, AW's of this size are now unavailable from all I can tell. I also had to consider that the MLR2 was designed to run on primaries at 3V so I decided that LiFePO4 batteries were the best choice given the lower voltage and better availability of them. My search revealed that the selection of any rechargeable RCR2 these days was limited to Ultrafire or Soshine. Most Ultrafires were Li-ion at 3.7V while the Soshine selection included 3.0V nominal voltage LiFePO4s. The Soshines seemed like the obvious choice.

The other consideration was a charger. A number of old posts on recharging RCR2s discuss what charger should be used. Much like the flashlights, dedicated chargers for RCR2 have pretty much gone extinct. This meant having to find a discontinued model or finding a solution to charge a RCR2 with makeshift spacers or magnets. Fortunately, my research revealed that Xtar once made the MP2S, a portable charger for 16340s and 15270s. It has screw-in spacers for 15270s and a switch to select between 3.0V charging and 3.7V charging. It seemed like the ideal charger and I found a brand new one on ebay so I snatched that up.

While the year 2017 has revealed that CR2-powered flashlights, including the Foursevens MLR2, are pretty much extinct with just a few exceptions (i.e., Nitecore SENS Mini), finding a rechargeable solution to power them isn't out of reach. Between my two Soshine LiFePO4s and the Xtar MP2S, it came out to $20. Not a bad price to pay to keep the MLR2 to play instead of resorting it to storage/emergency for the lack of rechargeables.

On another positive note, my dedication to the MLR2 paid off today. I was on Foursevens' website and noticed that the 360 headband I wanted for a while was 50% off. It's one that holds an MLR2 (among others) to make it a headlamp. However, looking at the clearance items, I saw that an Atom AL + the 360 headband as a kit was 70% off. That's $15 for the headband I wanted (the original price of it) but with another Foursevens flashlight!
 

bltkmt

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I apologize for the grave-digging, but this thread is the latest one regarding CR2 flashlights. Most others on CPF are from 2005 to 2009.
However, the years since the CR2's were discussed have revealed their fate. CR2 flashlights are nearly extinct, especially with smaller Li-ion 10180 keychain lights hitting the market more recently. Between 10180's with built-in MicroUSB recharging and the more powerful CR123/16340 flashlights, looks like the industry has closed the door on CR2-based lights. However, I own a CR2 flashlight so I had some concerns.

I recently researched on CPF and elsewhere about RCR2 options for my 4Sevens Mini MLR2 G2. I had bought the flashlight years ago when I got a bunch of CR2 primary batteries for free. Given the battery supply, I figured to get a flashlight for my collection that runs on them. While my primary supply is healthy (though getting old), I wanted to switch to RCR2 once they were done. My research showed there are 15266 and 15270 Li-ions, but some that used to be available years ago no longer are. For example, AW's of this size are now unavailable from all I can tell. I also had to consider that the MLR2 was designed to run on primaries at 3V so I decided that LiFePO4 batteries were the best choice given the lower voltage and better availability of them. My search revealed that the selection of any rechargeable RCR2 these days was limited to Ultrafire or Soshine. Most Ultrafires were Li-ion at 3.7V while the Soshine selection included 3.0V nominal voltage LiFePO4s. The Soshines seemed like the obvious choice.

The other consideration was a charger. A number of old posts on recharging RCR2s discuss what charger should be used. Much like the flashlights, dedicated chargers for RCR2 have pretty much gone extinct. This meant having to find a discontinued model or finding a solution to charge a RCR2 with makeshift spacers or magnets. Fortunately, my research revealed that Xtar once made the MP2S, a portable charger for 16340s and 15270s. It has screw-in spacers for 15270s and a switch to select between 3.0V charging and 3.7V charging. It seemed like the ideal charger and I found a brand new one on ebay so I snatched that up.

While the year 2017 has revealed that CR2-powered flashlights, including the Foursevens MLR2, are pretty much extinct with just a few exceptions (i.e., Nitecore SENS Mini), finding a rechargeable solution to power them isn't out of reach. Between my two Soshine LiFePO4s and the Xtar MP2S, it came out to $20. Not a bad price to pay to keep the MLR2 to play instead of resorting it to storage/emergency for the lack of rechargeables.

On another positive note, my dedication to the MLR2 paid off today. I was on Foursevens' website and noticed that the 360 headband I wanted for a while was 50% off. It's one that holds an MLR2 (among others) to make it a headlamp. However, looking at the clearance items, I saw that an Atom AL + the 360 headband as a kit was 70% off. That's $15 for the headband I wanted (the original price of it) but with another Foursevens flashlight!


Please let us know how this setup works out. I have a few CR2 lights still.
 

KuroNekko

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Please let us know how this setup works out. I have a few CR2 lights still.

I can already tell you that the Soshine RCR2s fit and work well in the Foursevens Mini MLR2. The dimensions are nearly identical to a primary CR2 battery. I briefly tested both of the Soshines after the Xtar MP2S charger topped them off and their performance is comparable in output to a primary CR2.
 

RGRAY

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I have 10. ;)

FOURSEVENS
Fellhoelter Bolt-Action alm CR2
Fellhoelter Bolt-Action cu CR2
Fellhoelter Bolt-Action ti CR2
LUMMI
Raw alm CR2
MUYSHONDT
Ion alm nat 2 stage CR2
Ion alm black 2 stage CR2
Aeon Mk. ll alm black 3 stage CR2
Aeon Mk. ll ti 3 stage CR2
Aeon Mk. lll ti CR2
Aeon Mk. lll cu CR2
 

ZMZ67

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I can already tell you that the Soshine RCR2s fit and work well in the Foursevens Mini MLR2. The dimensions are nearly identical to a primary CR2 battery. I briefly tested both of the Soshines after the Xtar MP2S charger topped them off and their performance is comparable in output to a primary CR2.

The Foursevens Mini MLR2 is a great light, my favorite of the Mini line. I have to pass on RCR2s as I don't think the MLR2 was designed for it. I was able to pick up a couple ALR2 Atoms in the clearance sale.
 

KuroNekko

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The Foursevens Mini MLR2 is a great light, my favorite of the Mini line. I have to pass on RCR2s as I don't think the MLR2 was designed for it. I was able to pick up a couple ALR2 Atoms in the clearance sale.

It does appear that the MLR2 was designed for use with primary CR2s as you stated. However, I searched a number of old threads on here and some reported reliable usage even with 3.7V ICR 15270 Li-ions with the MLR2. Max output is reportedly boosted to about 300 lumens. However, it seems the people who run them limit the usage to only low or mid settings due to the heat. This is why I went with the LiFePO4s. After fulling charging them, they did show a voltage of 3.34V, but if the MLR2 has been tested with fully charged ICRs at 4.2V, I figure it should be safe enough. I'll report here of any issues if they arise.
 

ZMZ67

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Your probably right that LiFePO4s are OK to use since they limit the voltage. I have been pretty happy with primaries but might reconsider rechargables if CR2s are too difficult to obtain in the future. I really wish production would have continued with the MLR2 as it is such a great little light!
 

etc

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Yes, CR2 is a dying breed. 123 does everything it does and more, is cheaper and more common.

There is no reason at all to have a CR2 device of any kind.

AAA has the same situation. Both marginally smaller but why is that good? I like AA/123. 18650 most of all.
 

ZMZ67

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Yes, CR2 is a dying breed. 123 does everything it does and more, is cheaper and more common.

There is no reason at all to have a CR2 device of any kind.

AAA has the same situation. Both marginally smaller but why is that good? I like AA/123. 18650 most of all.

What seems like a little difference in size and weight can make a big difference for pocket carry IME. It doesn't seem likely that manufacturers will continue with production of CR2 lights but that is unfortunate. The Mini MLR2 is my favorite of the Mini series,including the new Mk II even though the CR123 versions offer higher performance. I wasn't a fan of CR2 lights until I actually had one but now I would like to see more choices.If the Olight SMini or Zebra SC32 were made in CR2 with similar reduction in size achieved between the Mini 123 and Mini CR2 I would be a buyer.
 
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Boris74

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Yes, CR2 is a dying breed. 123 does everything it does and more, is cheaper and more common.

There is no reason at all to have a CR2 device of any kind.

AAA has the same situation. Both marginally smaller but why is that good? I like AA/123. 18650 most of all.

i feel the same way, but if olight made a Smicro Baton that ran a CR2 with the magnetic charger in Ti I'd be stupid enough to buy one. A H1 micro headlamp that ran all night on the 3 and 15 lumen setting like I mostly use on the H1R would be bought by me as well.

Even though the S1R and H1R run longer than I need for days of use on a charge at lumens you use when not playing with a light on the back deck between posts and is still small and light, there are them people who want to dump weight. Ounces equal pounds and pounds equal pain when you're out hunting hiking or camping. Any and everywhere weight can be dumped it will. I'd love a micro H1R. For now people dumping weight anywhere they can settle for things like the H1R while hunting hiking or camping, because it's lighter than the stooper lumen heavier not even needed options. Make it smaller and just as useful and people will buy. I know the size of the H1R is realistically huge compared to what they are actually used for. It could be made much smaller and just as useful in every category. The only people who need turbo and Uber throw for 37 seconds are them people playing with lights on the back deck during commercial breaks on TV or between posts online washing out porch and street lights in suburbia. In total darkness stupid bright lights are a negative. 12-15 lumens is blast status in complete darkness in the woods or on the trails. Smaller lights are all that's needed and it could be done with batteries like the CR2.
 
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KuroNekko

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I think CR123A does make the CR2 rather an odd selection for a power source, but as others have stated, size and weight can come into play. For me, it's more about "fit". While CR123A-sized flashlights are compact, their girth isn't exactly optimal for pocket carry. When clipped to my pocket for something like a hike, I actually feel a CR123A sized flashlight and sometimes find the chafing annoying. I actually prefer to carry something like this in a holster rather than in my pocket with a clip. On the contrary, I find that CR2-sized lights like my MLR2 are small enough to not have the same annoying issue and fit fine completely inside a pant or jacket pocket.

That being said, I'll admit I only got a CR2-powered flashlight after getting my hands on a bunch of free primary CR2 batteries. Having nothing else to use them on, I justified getting another flashlight given the batteries. Now that I also have a rechargeable supply, I can't say I regret my MLR2 at all. It comes in nicely in size and purpose between my 10180-powered Jetbeam Mini-1 and my CR123A Rofis TR10.
 
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