Basic question re: Rechargeables

AFAustin

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I realize that this is a very basic question in a topic category that usually deals with very sophisticated electronics issues, but I would really appreciate any responses:

Other than the obvious economic advantage of being able to re-use the same batteries, are there other advantages to using rechargeables in a flashlight, such as a more constant output in a semi-regulated flashlight, more light intensity, longer runtime, or...? I am wondering specifically if making the jump to rechargeables would benefit my Peak LED lights (AA and AAA).

Thanks in advance for any help.
 

VidPro

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when used HARD rechargables beat the snot out of alkiholic batteries /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/twakfl.gif
on high consumption devices, rechargables here have been a Must, like our wireless transmitters, get 2X running time over alkies.
digital cameras, and Flash units get 2-3-4 just Loads more pictures, because the flash charge is hard, and alkies dont like how hard it hits for the SIZE.

the voltage is maintained mostly through its discharge , which means i usually dont even use regualtion.
BUT
ni-mhy self discharges , so for that stuff you DONT use, and low consumption devices, like remotes, its not so good.
AND

LITHIUMS in a non-rechargable are similar too, they hold more juice for longer, and stay at thier voltage better.
but they presentally cost a mint, and all that great metal is going to go to waste.
also other wild chemistires that cost a lot and throw away, like metal-air Zinc-air , and stuff like that.

lithium-ION in a rechargable CAN cell, have far less self discharge, buku output for its size, but require "special" charge discharge attention from the electronics that use em.

Think about this, if every battery was re-used, the stuff used to make it becomes more available.
Recharge, and we will have MORE :) more is better.
2000Tons of lithium, tossed out, that could have lived even 300 more times , sounds cool to me.

123s have basically just started to be rechargable, but other sizes and types have been developed and improved for YEARS, so they are up to par. (good AA C & D's)

for 123s the non-rechargables have been LITHIUM often, so they are a good primary in a small size.
eventually i think we will see more potent rechargable 123s even.

the one thing that they havent made a awesome rechargable for is the 9V , they just arent getting the juice in them, and the demand is not there either.
 

Phaserburn

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Rechargeables, especially nimh and nicads, can supply an application with ALOT more current than alks can. For example, a common incandescent flashlight can be modded to use a much higher wattage bulb. Alkalines cannot provide the current required to take advantage of these bulbs. But rechargeables can. A favorite Mag mod in these parts is using a Welch Allyn bulb with rechargeable batteries in a large variety of configurations. A stock Mag bulb usually draws in the neighborhood of .8Amps; even at that rate, the alkaline batteries will decline significantly, by up to 50%, within the first hour, and have declining performance all the way from almost the first few minutes. A typical "super" bulb can draw anywhere from 2 to 4Amps. This would bring alks to their knees in seconds, but rechargeables will fully supply the current required in a far more flat discharge.

Short version: rechargeables in incans are required for really bright lights. And rechargeables offer far more constant output, without regulation circuitry, than alkaline cells.
 

AFAustin

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"Short version: rechargeables in incans are required for really bright lights. And rechargeables offer far more constant output, without regulation circuitry, than alkaline cells."

[/ QUOTE ]

Would this also apply to LED lights?

Thanks.
 

PlayboyJoeShmoe

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Then there are the mAh ratings of the batteries to goof with.

My Garmin Etrex GPSR responds GREATLY to 2300 and 2500 mAh Energizer/Sanyos that won't even fit in some lights.

2100mAh E/Ss run one of my 1274 lights and my troublesome (for other reasons) 1185 light.

The smaller mAh batteries hold voltage better under load. But the Etrex and a few other things LIKE the big fat NimHs!

As for LED lights, it kind of depends on the light. I get good runtime out of anything from 1850 to 2300 mAh E/Ss in my Lambda pilled Minim*g EDC, and also in an XM-3 that my nephew plays with a LOT when he's here!

But I leave alks in most of the LED lights, as they last a long time unused.
 
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