beginner road bike???

chimo

chimo

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robo.. the best pump I've used is a Topeak Road Morph Pump. it's got a pressure gauge. best of all road morph easily puts 110+ lbs into tire. https://shop.sunrisecyclery.com/item/12540

a must have piece of gear!

no longer use CO2 cartridges ... a pita to use.

That's the one that I use. Nice pump - it's fairly fast as well. I have had to use it a few times while commuting.

Paul
 
Robocop

Robocop

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Cy I actually did try a little larger pump designed to be frame mounted. It was very similiar to the link you gave both in shape and size and also had a pressure guage. Regardless of the mounting position I had trouble pedaling and clearing the pump. It kept hitting my legs when I pedaled. I could keep it from hitting if I concentrated however figured it was only a matter of time until it caused me to wreck.

The mounting brackets seem to be the same for most pumps and fit on the same holes as the water bottles. I had no choice but to mount it on either the front or rear cage holes. Both ways it was in the way so I chose a much more streamlined pump. I thought those larger pumps were designed for mountain bikers or at least that is what I thought with the one I returned. I know it was made by Bell and the guage went to 130 PSI however I cant find a link online.

I think I will practice this week on changing out the tube and see just how hard it is to do. It will be much nicer if I mess up while in my living room rather than 50 miles out on the trail.
 
C

cy

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this is one of those few times.... look alikes will not do the same job.
road morph pump is one of the few pumps on the market that easily pumps up past 100psi.

mine rides in my camelbak. ya it's a pita to carry, but with today's high pressure tires. pinch flats will result if you don't inflate to rated pressures. tuffy tube liners will help with thorns, but not snake bites from running too low tire pressures.

you might consider doing a dry run at home. break down your tire... take the tube out. put it all back together, then use your pump to see if you can achieve full tire pressures.

Cy I actually did try a little larger pump designed to be frame mounted. It was very similiar to the link you gave both in shape and size and also had a pressure guage. .
 
orbital

orbital

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Robo, it really sounds like your cycling is going well for you.

When talking about flats, the quality of tire has alot to do with it also.
There are aspects of tire technology not always talked about,

For example:

* TPI ~ threads per inch in tire casing, the more the better.
* Tire compound ~ Supersoft/superlight can sometimes wear out in days,...no good.
* Sidewall construction ~ this goes hand in hand and hand with TPI, better tires will have improved sidewall designs to reduce pinch flats.

For Road biking I use Michelin Krylion Carbon tires.
I cannot say in words how good these tires are. Very consistent handling and great sidewall construction. They are reasonably light and relatively cheap.

More importantly, the Michelin Carbons have absolutely unbelievable tread life....I highly recommend them!

I'v had only one flat on them with over 2500 miles on my current set.
My roads are constantly climbing and descending glaciated hills in Wisconsin.

I used this setup on my one flat without issue:

http://www.genuineinnovations.com/bikeprods.aspx?prodid=1000
 
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Robocop

Robocop

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Well just to clarify many said it would happen and yes it finally did....I went down pretty hard Saturday while riding. For some stupid reason I tried to pull up the front tire while riding to clear a pothole. I forgot the bike is only 18 lbs and pushed hard on the pedals......yep the front end came down sideways and shot me off course in a split second.

The bad part is that I flew off the bike and hit my g/f who rode to my left....she went down also. 3200 dollars worth of bikes flying through the air and man did it make me feel sick to see that. We both are ok and have a little road rash with minimal damage to the bikes. Both bikes suffered badly scratched shifter levers and some damage to the sides of the seats. I was suprised to see both bikes actually came through it pretty good and we managed to bend the levers back into place and drive them 8 more miles home.

The good news is that my g/f is still with me in spite of it all (grin) and that we are both ok. I will say I will never again doubt a good helmet as we both had pretty expensive helmets. Both helmets took a good hit on the pavement and showed damage yet neither of us had a scratch on our heads. I am buying us both new helmets this week and plan to again buy the better ones. I remember getting angry when I found out how much the better helmets cost.....now I am very happy I chose to buy one.
 
Steve K

Steve K

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hi Robo,

Glad to hear that you and your sweetie are okay!

Despite the various arguements about helmets, it's nice to have one on your noggin when these little upsets occur. Good to hear that you're replacing them, but I'm not sure that a more expensive helmet offers more protection than a lower cost helmet. Mostly, they offer better ventilation, improved fitting options, lighter weight (slightly), and status. I've been pretty happy using the Giro "Indicator" model for 5 or 6 years. About $35 right now. A goofy name, but a good price!

If your bikes use carbon forks, you might ask the shop to give them a look-over. They are probably just fine, but it's good to get an expert opinion. Carbon forks don't tolerate abuse especially well, and when they fail, it can be abrupt. The fork, stem, and handlebars are the only things keeping your teeth and face from becoming part of the road, so you don't want to take any chances with them.

Don't feel too bad about the incident. It's just part of the learning process, and now your girlfriend has learned to not let you ride too close to her. :)

take care,
Steve K.
 
Black Rose

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When I was riding more seriously, before the arthritis set in, that was the one thing I never did on my Cannondale. I had many opportunities but managed to keep upright somehow.

Perhaps the memory of my spectacular wipeout in my teens had something to do with it....nothing like landing on your back at 35 mph on fresh stone chip pavement to leave it's mark (literally).

Back then I didn't have a helmet. hmmm...that might explain a few things :crackup:
 
J

jtr1962

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My worst fall was at 37 mph after hitting a pothole. I slid along the ground about 100 feet. Fortunately all I got was road rash. No helmet but back then (mid 1980s) helmets really didn't exist even if you wanted to wear one. I haven't fallen now in probably 7 or 8 years. I've just gotten a lot better at anticipating, watching, and also recovering. A few weeks ago unbeknownst to me my front tire lost enough air so that the sidewall would collapse in a fast turn. Sure enough, as I'm making a u-turn the front wheel starts to lose traction but I managed to recover before I fell. If a fall is inevitable, the best thing is to outstretch your arms to keep your head from hitting the ground. The outstretched arms will also protect your head if you slide into a solid object. All this is doubly important if you don't wear a helmet but is a good idea even if you do. A helmet offers little protection at impact speeds much above 10 mph. Learning to fall properly is crucial if you ride much above that speed. Any helmet which did protect better at perhaps 30 mph would be much too heavy for cycling.

There are several techniques for going over large potholes. One is to just ride faster. You can literally fly over smaller holes that way. Another is to stand on the pedals and let the bike pivot over the hole. This greatly lessens shock on the bike, and will often keep you from falling. It's probably never a good idea to intentionally try to lift your front wheel. You lose most of your braking and all of your steering.

All this being said, I tend to think the danger of cycling is often exaggerated. In over 58,000 miles I've only had a few cases of road rash, no broken bones, and a few trashed rims. The most dangerous thing is cars. If you're lucky enough to have a bike path with no traffic then 99% of the danger is gone.
 
C

cy

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robo... glad you and GF came out ok for your first spill...

hey it happens to the best! real soon you'll be bunny hopping over those pot holes. first scratches are the most painful!

how to react when riding close to other riders is definitely a skill set.

folks that ride in packs usually don't trust new riders until they prove them selves. usually by riding their line no matter what happens. slamming on brakes when someone is riding on your wheel ... can take someone out.... or possibly take down most of the group.

we used to do drills, where we bump into each other at speed on purpose. same for overlapping tires... which is another no no..

we'd also do drills wacking each other's rear tire with your front tire. the same for bunny hops at speed directly at curbs and sideway into curbs.

rotating tires generate an amazing amount of gyroscopic action. one is really more stable than it appears. it's usually the rider's action .. ie panic that takes down the rider.
 
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Robocop

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I firmly believe it was simply my lack of experience that brought me down. Honestly I never saw it coming and had zero time to panic. I have not ridden in years and all my bikes as a child were much heavier. When I pushed hard and pulled up the bike seemed like it lost all control. The front tire was maybe 2 feet off the ground and quickly slammed back down veering wildly to the left.

Holy smoke was I caught by suprise as I was really expecting the bike to react much like a heavier bike would. I now know much better to ever do that again and maybe this will actually make me a better rider. Up until this accident I was riding 60 to 70 miles at times with the average being about 40 each Saturday. My average speeds are usually around 16 to 18 mph with my highest speed thus far at 47 mph....(downhill)

I thought I knew what I was doing however man was I way wrong about that. I had no idea how twitchy this bike could be if pushed the wrong way yet again I will take this as a learning experience. I am planning to have the shop go over both bikes to check for any damage I cant see and to also see about replacing the shifter levers. I was much more shocked when I saw how expensive a simple pair of Shimano 105 STI shifters will set me back......cheapest thus far is close to 300 dollars.

The levers still shift and "seem" to work just fine however I am a little nervous about depending on them after they have been so beaten up. I also feel very bad about damaging the levers on my g/f bike so I am replacing those even if the damage is cosmetic only. Any ideas on where I may find a pair of 105s for a good deal?.....I have had so much luck with my bike shop that I am really thinking about trusting them to supply the parts and just repair whatever needs repairing. I feel they will give me a good cost on parts....especially as I have spent 4k there in the last few months.
 
TONY M

TONY M

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Glad you and the GF are not too badly hurt. If you don't fancy the road a turbo trainer may be for you! lol.

If you can trust you're bike shop they should be fine to carry out the repairs.

Keep riding!
 
orbital

orbital

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Robo, glad to hear you and your gal are OK.. :thumbsup:

Don't be hard on yourself about a fall.
Its too easy to say, 'you could have done this, or that'.
{one thing,..you would want to be off your saddle before trying clear potholes, large cracks, RR tracks ect..}
Do practice some of your riding off the saddle.

In cycling, your bike handling skills improve with every ride,
so heads up and ride on!
 
chimo

chimo

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Glad to see you and the g/f are OK. You may want to keep an eye out on this ebay store. I just got a pair of XT pedals from them - pretty good price and reasonable shipping. The store items change so you may have to check from time to time. They have a mix of mountain and road stuff.

Paul
 
Robocop

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Well once again the value of a great bike shop to me is crystal clear. I just spoke to the owner of the shop we bought these bikes from and he is a real classy man indeed. The owner has seen us shopping there many times after our initial purchase as we buy clothes, power gel, computers, and many other smaller items weekly.

He told me to bring the bikes to him assuring me he would inspect the bikes and make them good as new. He said he feels we will be loyal customers in the future and when we decide to upgrade bikes we will use his shop. He said he really appreciates loyalty and noticed that we shop with him for all of our gear. I was really shocked when he offered to do minor repairs for free and even more shocked when he gave me prices on the shifters....he gave me half off of any parts needed and beat the best prices on the net by at least 100 dollars.

He seems as if he really wants me to enjoy my riding and did say that after a spill many riders will stop riding due to very high repair bills. He advised me to keep riding saying that wrecks are common and the main thing is to learn from it and keep on enjoying the sport. He feels that by repairing my bike for little cost it will keep my interest and as such he will keep my business.

Now this my friends is customer service and I am leaving the bikes with him tomorrow. I told him to repair or replace whatever needed it and I would gladly pay him for his trouble. I do trust him not to gouge me on costs and now feel much better about the whole incident......looks like I will be going again in no time.

I have met some very nice people in this sport and would hate to have to give it up for a while due to saving up my cash for costly repairs. Needless to say I plan to send as much business to this shop as possible and am already planning the next bike when I do upgrade....:twothumbs
 
Steve K

Steve K

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Good to see the shop being so helpful, and also good to keep bringing business back to the shop.

STI levers are one of the annoying aspects of modern bikes, though. They are extremely convenient, but also extremely pricey.

If you stick with the sport and decide to save a little money, you might consider changing to bar-end shifters. The shifters themselves cost around $80(?), and new brake levers are less ($50???). The shift levers will last a very long time compared to STI, and can even revert to friction shifting mode if there is a problem with the indexing.

Or.. convert the bike to a fixed gear and get rid of all of the derailleur system. :)

These are just thoughts for the future. In the meantime, keep building your skills and having fun!

Steve
 
Robocop

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Well I got our bikes back today and the total repair cost was 312 dollars....this included a new helmet for us as well as a new shimano 105 shifter set for the g/f. I also replaced the bar tape on both bikes and had a complete check over on both bikes for any cracks or defects from the wreck. Both bikes did need to have the wheels trued up with the shop advising this is common after a wreck.

They both look good as new and perform as new also. I rode again for the first time after the wreck Saturday and while a little nervous I quickly got over it. I did 30 miles until we lost our daylight so we headed in early. It looks like the only thing lost in this event was a little skin and a pair of riding clothes....plus a little ego of me thinking I was a much better rider than I really am...:crackup:

This weekend we plan to go back to the area we wrecked at and try it again for maybe 60 miles. I am trying to get as much time in before the weather turns cold here. Thanks again for the input and wish me luck....
 
L

LED_Thrift

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve K
Or.. convert the bike to a fixed gear and get rid of all of the derailleur system. :)

That's fine if you don't ride where there are hills. Pretty hard around here.

I personally like the idea of getting rid of the derailleurs and going for a Rohloff hub!

Derailleurs can be a pita, but they are quite efficient at transferring your power to the wheels. I've heard Rohloff's are durable, but I don't know how much more durable they are.
 
J

jtr1962

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I've heard Rohloff's are durable, but I don't know how much more durable they are.
They're basically bullet-proof from what I've read. I hear they take a few thousand miles just to break in, and last literally forever. Besides, they can be rebuilt if need be. As far as efficiency, I think the top 7 speeds are about the same as a derailleur, the bottom 7 speeds a little less efficient. Overall a great product which I would buy in a heartbeat if I could afford it.
 

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