beginner road bike???

cy

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sure sounds like your local shop really took care of you!!!

one major factor for road bike stability is width of tires. make sure your tires are a min of 25mm wide... 23mm-28mm is ideal for beginners and serious roadies. most racers will go with 23mm for training. on time trials.. they may go thin as 19mm jacked up to 200 psi, which are like riding on rails... can get dicey in a hurry...

don't go by markings on tire... take an actual measurement. would not go below 25mm... will make a major difference in stability without losing much in higher rolling resistance.

continental tires are my favorites... hate to say it... but I buy em 8 at a time from price point. usually $12 each when I find a deal.

currently my road bike is in touring mode running specialized Armourdillo 700x23c. they are all but puncture proof.

have logged in thousands of road miles Victoria CX's sewups. that's all I used to train with...now days .. hardly anyone rides sewups for training. unless you've got a deep pocket sponsor.

Well I got our bikes back today and the total repair cost was 312 dollars....this included a new helmet for us as well as a new shimano 105 shifter set for the g/f. I also replaced the bar tape on both bikes and had a complete check over on both bikes for any cracks or defects from the wreck. Both bikes did need to have the wheels trued up with the shop advising this is common after a wreck.

They both look good as new and perform as new also. I rode again for the first time after the wreck Saturday and while a little nervous I quickly got over it. I did 30 miles until we lost our daylight so we headed in early. It looks like the only thing lost in this event was a little skin and a pair of riding clothes....plus a little ego of me thinking I was a much better rider than I really am...:crackup:

This weekend we plan to go back to the area we wrecked at and try it again for maybe 60 miles. I am trying to get as much time in before the weather turns cold here. Thanks again for the input and wish me luck....
 

cy

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kinda of stiff... compared to a nice set of conti's

but got tired of all the flats I was getting. sure seems I get flats in batches... no flats for a year... then 6 flats in a row..:whistle:

got sick of flats... that when I slapped on a set of amourdillo's... zero flats since then...

Hey cy, how do you find the handling and grip of the armadillos?
Thanks.
 

TONY M

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Thanks cy
but got tired of all the flats I was getting. sure seems I get flats in batches... no flats for a year... then 6 flats in a row..:whistle:
Same here. Untill recently no flats for many months made me feel pretty lucky but of course I got one last week and another today. :shrug:
 

DaFABRICATA

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BUMP....for a great thread... :twothumbs

I've taken the last 3 days to slowly reread through this thread and take in the advice and info of all the members.
I followed this thread a few years ago, as I too enjoy riding, but wasn't ready to try the road bike thing till now.
Robocop, Are you still riding?:popcorn:
If so, how are you liking it?


Riding my mountain bike has been my main form of transportation (other that walking) for about 8.5 years now and finally felt the need to try a road bike.
I lost my drivers license back in 2001 due to a bad decision on my part and just never tried to get it back.
During this time, I've made a LOT of lifestyle changes and plan to try to get it back soon.
I'm not looking forward to the extra expenses, but feel I have changed a lot since then and will never put myself in a situation to loose it again after I get it back.
Also getting around easier will be nice and will allow me to FINALLY move out of michigan to colorado...where biking is MUCH more fun!
My brother just bought a house in hillbillyville and I will be moving in with him by the end of this month and getting places will take MUCH more time than I am used to.
I figured a road bike would be the way to go as far as getting places faster and getting out to enjoy the looong country roads.

I rode a Klien "Mantra" (yellow bike) for over 10 years before getting the "Lefty"
I've been riding a Cannondale "Lefty" for about 3 years now and with my small under-seat tool bag, it weighs about 37lbs.
It has been fine for where I am currently living, as everything is VERY close, but when trying to do some longer rides, it just ends up feeling heavy.

My local bike shop has been pretty good so far and I put some money down on a Giant "TCR Advanced 2" after taking it for several long test rides.
They told me to have fun, be safe, and make sure I was back by closing time!
I know there will be some adjustments to make, but overall the bike felt great and rode like a dream!
I have never rode a true road bike until this and know I will enjoy it and getting places faster/ more efficiently.
Hopefully I'll be able to get it paid off in a month or two (time to sell some lights) and also have the shoes/pedals and padded shorts to go along with it.

This thread has had a lot of great info and suggestions and I look forward to really understanding and enjoying what road biking has to offer.


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LED_Thrift

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I remember this thread, it was a good read. It deserves awakeining.
The Giant looks like a great bike. Road bikes are much better on longer rides on pavement, especially hilly rides. It's great that they let you take it out on long test rides, that's the only way to really know before you buy. Hope you enjoy it.
 

jtr1962

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I was thinking about this thread just the other day, wondering if Robocop is still riding. In any case, it's a great thread to revive, with plenty of good info.

Congratulations on the new wheels, DaFABRICATA! She looks like she'll eat up the miles!
 

Robocop

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Gentlemen yes this was a great learning thread for me and I am still riding for now. I was forced to put most extra activities on hold as my father suddenly became ill with cancer so I did take a long break from riding as well as CPF.....I have been slowly getting back to my old routine but I must say it is tough to start over.

I foolishly thought I would just jump back on and tackle those 50 mile rides with ease....in 98 degree weather....well I was wrong. :sick2: It is taking a little time to get my legs back however it is much better than when I first started simply because I am more comfortable on the bike now.

I also found that it is a balancing act between the gym for power and size or go for a little leaner look for better performance on the bike. I do enjoy the gym and I do enjoy the muscle it gives me however over time I have found this can be a negative point when riding with other veteran riders. I have the power to leave them early on however they always....and I mean always...catch me then pass me for miles.

I decided to keep in the gym and just ride for fun rather than try to keep up with those 120 lb speed demons. Maybe they simply cut the wind better however I was really impressed, and humbled, by some of those thin guys and their endurance.

I will say that I am very happy I took the time to research the sport before I bought a bike. I learned much here as well as from bike shops and everyone advised me to start with as much bike as I could afford. This good advice has paid off as I have ridden pretty hard at times and have probably about 800 trouble free miles on my bike.....I have seen cheaper less quality bikes break easily and cause the owner to lose interest in the sport. Plus a good quality bike is easier to ride and as such will keep you interested in the sport much longer.

When I took a break I was doing probably 50 miles every Saturday and sometimes more. I had logged an 80 mile ride in one day with no problems however have yet to tackle that again. I would like to ride this August in the 150 mile charity ride (March of Dimes) yet time will tell if I can pull that off.

Believe it or not the coolest part for me was picking out my gear. I bought a nicer helmet that vents well and a cool little pouch that fits under the seat. I bought some slick little Co2 cans that will inflate the tire as well as a few tools for changing the tube if I have a flat. I also have a spare frame attached pump that is about as big as a cigar...the whole set up is just pretty slick and the idea of being so self sufficient yet remaining light (18lbs total) is just pretty neat to me.

I have an account at Nashbar that I use often for riding clothes however I am just starting again to get that riding fever I had when I first started.....great read in this thread and again I appreciate all of the good information.
 

nbp

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bykfixer

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Contis are great tires.

I ride Panasonics on a box shaped Schwinn Wayfarer I converted into a Wrights Bros style racer.
Removed the Johnson bars, put on a mustache bar upside down and a leather seat.
Lot's of fun.
I had a spring loaded Schwinn book rack from the early 70's laying around, so I added that. I replaced the junk grip shift with a better grade one and replaced the junk gear selector with a rapid fire.

Brake shoes were replaced as the bike goes so dang fast so quickly.
I didn't want the factory pads.
I switched axles to hollow and replaced the metal fenders with light weight plastic.
I'm not done lightening the thing. But with thin wall alluminum frame and all the other weight reduction...she's a fast one.

I started out with 25mm tires, but the bike scared me so much I put on 28mm and lowered the pressure to 65+/-...that thing was scary fast with rock hard compound 25's at 90 psi.


Now the Giant Suede is a nice upright with a sorta cab forward crankshaft position.
It's much easier on old knees. And it's nice n light.
The sorta raised ridge tires are able to hold 75psi on supplied alluminum wheels yet the texture on the tires allows you turn make a left from pavement onto a trail.

It's a pricey bicycle from shops. The trick is to get a 'last years' model.
They go for around $3-400. Certainly not a Sprawl Mart priced bike.
But after riding it 50 miles having nothing go wrong, and at spring tune up time you'll know where your $ went.

I have a 21 speed that came with a front shock. It's gearing covers everything well.
I also bought a 7 speed. It's all rigid.
First gear is a granny gear, and 2-7 are good for going at a brisk pace.
Anything past 4th rarely gets used.

I replaced the seats with Cloud 9's. I also put a book rack on each one. Each are pushing 7 years old and I've yet to put a dime into either beyond normal maintenance.
 
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TKC

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Why don't you do talk to a bike shop, and test ride some bikes? That is what I did, when I was looking for a bike, and I found the perfect bike for my needs.
 

bykfixer

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^^ that's how I got hooked by the Suedes.

Where I live bike shops try to talk you into spending money for stuff you don't need or want.

I have a neighbor who bought a bike to lose weight. Dude was 300 pounds and the shop talked him into a bike with a 24 super thin spoke wheel set. Well after taking it back several times ($50/pop each time for repairs) he says "what am I doing wrong?". I said "going back to see the thief who sold you the wrong bike."... I hooked him up with a set of 48 spoke wheels, same diameter and he hasn't had a minute of trouble since.

They talked him into a $700 poj. But he coulda gotten a better bike for his needs for a lot less.
 
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orbital

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+

Always wanted a cross bike, decades for that matter, but could never justify the price

so last spring I picked up a used Raleigh Tamland 1 (demo from a bike shop) got an unreal deal on it.
Categorized as a 'gravel bike' it's basically a old-school steel mtn bike, but has disc brakes and road bars,
it's a bit heavy, but it's all about gearing & cadence anyway...

I did gear it even lower than stock, different cassette & chainring, it'll do just about anything %%%% really.
11t small cog really opens gearing options;)


stock photo
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harro

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To keep this thread alive, Cyclocross is something that hasn't really taken off in Australia ( a bit like FatBikes ). Although for the life of me, I don't know why. We ride on some pretty crappy roads at times, often suited to that style of bike. What is more popular here, if you aren't into wearing lycra and looking like a multi coloured fluro traffic billboard, is flat bar road bikes. Sort of a first cousin to a road bike, but flat bars and tyres more than likely around the 700c x 32 size, give or take, rather than the skinnier road tyres. Discs on road bikes are popular also, albeit very minimal, and being ' Straya ', we have our front brake on the rhs and rear on the left. I think it was something to do with driving on the left side of the road, when it was bought in decades ago. A few hardcore souls I know, have gone to the trouble of changing over STI levers and shifters to the Euro/American way.

A couple of pics of my 11 year old roadie,
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The bike doesn't lean forward as it appears to in the first pic, that was just an unintentional side effect of how the pic was taken. Seat and top of head stem are pretty much level. Frame measures 63CM from middle of bottom bracket to top of seat tube ( just above seat clamp ).
 
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