Best Tints for Visibility

Witterings

Enlightened
Joined
Dec 15, 2015
Messages
282
Generally are higher tints conssidered better for visibility than lower tints ... looking for one for cycling and we do quite a bit of narrow paths on the edge of fields so seeing clearly is fairly important to stay on the paths.

Would a 6000k be better than say a 4000k ?
 

KITROBASKIN

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 28, 2013
Messages
5,331
Location
New Mexico, USA
Do you enjoy seeing what your light shines upon?

Is it strictly for avoiding calamity?

I would always choose high color rendering to be able to distinguish more subtle shade differences that an animal may have compared to its environment, as well as enjoying the scenery, but that's me.

Personally, contrast is better with 5000K than 4000k. Others claim the opposite.

You may be limited on what product(s) you are considering. Tell us more.

6000K is too harsh for me. You might consider experimenting.
 

bykfixer

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 9, 2015
Messages
20,217
Location
John 3:16
A whiter tint gives the perception of being brighter. Between 4000 and 6000 won't seem all that much different though. It's when you get down to the 2000's and 3000's vs 6000 that the perception will be drastically affected.

When I need my brain to make snap decisions in darkness I prefer 5600 to 6200 kelvin.
 

Monocrom

Flashaholic
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
19,561
Location
NYC
Generally are higher tints conssidered better for visibility than lower tints ... looking for one for cycling and we do quite a bit of narrow paths on the edge of fields so seeing clearly is fairly important to stay on the paths.

Would a 6000k be better than say a 4000k ?
If you want the best visibility, 6000K or 6500K.
If you want to see more detail, but not as bright, 4000K.
You could go lower than 4000K but honestly it's just not worth it.
 

alpg88

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Apr 19, 2005
Messages
5,216
I like how things look in 3000k but you need 2-3x as many lumens to match perceived brightness of 5000k. I find warmer tints are easier on the eyes, but it is just me. It is basically comes down to, when you turn 5000-6000k light in a dark place, first moment you'll close your eyes cuz it will hurt, you'll have a "oh crap" moment, but with 3000k, the hit to the eyes is much softer, you wont have to even close your eyes initially. Just to be clear i do not mean you look directly into the light. just the light reflected off surfaces.
 

jtr1962

Flashaholic
Joined
Nov 22, 2003
Messages
7,502
Location
Flushing, NY
Probably stay in the 5000K to 6000K range. Get high CRI if possible. For cycling especially high CCT makes sense. You have greater contrast, which means you see road defects better. It also enhances your peripheral vision, which is very important at cycling speeds.

I'm currently using some of those bike lights with the built-in run-time displays. I left the stock ~7000K LEDs in for now, but down the road I may replace them with something like 5600K, 95 CRI just to see if it makes things better.

I like how things look in 3000k but you need 2-3x as many lumens to match perceived brightness of 5000k. I find warmer tints are easier on the eyes, but it is just me. It is basically comes down to, when you turn 5000-6000k light in a dark place, first moment you'll close your eyes cuz it will hurt, you'll have a "oh crap" moment, but with 3000k, the hit to the eyes is much softer, you wont have to even close your eyes initially. Just to be clear i do not mean you look directly into the light. just the light reflected off surfaces.
Correct that you need 2 to 3 times the lumens for the same perceived brightness at lower CCTs. Unfortunately, NYC didn't get the message when they took out some of the 4300K streetlights (which I thought were great), and stuck in 3000K ones. In fact, it looks like they went with lower lumens as well when they should have done the opposite. Or better yet, just ignore the minority of complainers and leave the 4300K ones alone. Given that this impacts safety a group of us should try to get NYC to revert back to the 4300K lighting.
 

Witterings

Enlightened
Joined
Dec 15, 2015
Messages
282
Do you enjoy seeing what your light shines upon?

Is it strictly for avoiding calamity?

Cheers for eveyone's input and to answer the above ... for this particular torch it's just for clarity, I have torches that are pleasing to the eye that I use for walking the dogs etc. .... this is purely to keep me on the trails rather than in the ditches :D

Judging by the overall response though seems as though each has it's benefits so probably best off going for the middle ground and getting something around the 5k level.
 

NRiyo3

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Sep 24, 2022
Messages
19
Location
USA
Match your CCT to your time of day/night usage. If you need to remain alert and are working night shifts on the regular that a cooler CCT will help but if you typically need to sleep within a few hours of nightfall a warmer CCT can aid in your circadian rhythm. And from here you can get really specific to a persons preference and age has a big factor on this. As we age blue light radiation really stresses our eyes and causes fatigue. In my 20's I loved the cool blue look of 6000K lights. Now in my 40's I really enjoy neutral CCT's during my working hours and the warmer 3000K-2000K CCT's are great for a relaxing walk or reading a book. With a set of blue blocking glasses and a warm CCT you almost have candlelight.

Further info:

 
Joined
Sep 30, 2020
Messages
156
Location
Caught in an air duct
Do you enjoy seeing what your light shines upon?

Is it strictly for avoiding calamity?

I would always choose high color rendering to be able to distinguish more subtle shade differences that an animal may have compared to its environment, as well as enjoying the scenery, but that's me.

Personally, contrast is better with 5000K than 4000k. Others claim the opposite.

You may be limited on what product(s) you are considering. Tell us more.

6000K is too harsh for me. You might consider experimenting.
+1.
4500K-5000K for me. Like the old Elzetta Bravo AVS (my EDC) before they ruined it.
 

ilikeguns40

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Mar 8, 2022
Messages
1,335
Location
Western PA
Lights I use around the house and early mornings are around 3000-4000k. Lights I use for work are usually between 4500-5700k since there's usually ambient light. However, everyone is different. I've used my 3000k lights at work with ambient light and they do just fine at higher outputs

High CRI is a must have. You'll also enjoy using your lights much more just because of how nice everything looks

519a 5000k is one of my favorites
 
Last edited:

orbital

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 8, 2007
Messages
4,215
Location
WI
+

Cooler tint will serve you better for your cycling.

Nothing is worse than yellowish tints, it just makes everything yellow looking
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Top