BIG light head

precisionworks

Flashaholic
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
6,623
Location
Benton Illinois
My customer said it's OK to post photos as long as there are no details (or not too many):

head1.jpg

head2.jpg

head4.jpg

head3.jpg

Solid 7075 round stock, 3" (about 75 mm) diameter.

  • First image is skim cutting the surface, attempting to retain as much diameter as possible
  • 2" spade drill, no pilot hole as none is needed for a smaller hole such as this
  • 1.25" (about 32 mm) boring bar taking the hole out to about 2.60" (66 mm)
About two hours on the lathe & a 5 gallon bucket (19 litres) full of aluminum curls, chips, shavings, etc. What a mess. At least the customer pays for the cleanup :nana:

head5.jpg


Wild guess ... multiple emitters around 50 watts total, powered by a custom rolled Li-Poly cell with roughly 100,000 mAh. Big Dog.
 
Last edited:

TexasLumens

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Sep 11, 2012
Messages
92
Location
Amarillo, TX
Thanks for sharing. I make that same mess multiple times a day.... and I have the same thought... "At least I am getting paid" :whistle: I get tired of doing that but it's just part of the deal.

Nice images... it looks like after a day in front of those cranks, we wouldn't want to see images of a spinning chuck for awhile... but I always enjoy seeing it!!! Thanks again. TL.
 

Str8stroke

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 27, 2013
Messages
5,032
Location
On The Black Pearl
Neat, any clues as to what body this Big head will be mounted on?? Aluminum.....hum...I bet it would have been a few more hours if it were Ti. lol
 

precisionworks

Flashaholic
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
6,623
Location
Benton Illinois
... I make that same mess multiple times a day....
Only those who've BTDT can truly appreciate how messy it is to core out a large chuck of aluminum. Not sure it the images make it clear that the lathe is running my 4-jaw that just clears the bed. I like that old chuck as it's almost impossible to mess it up by cranking down on the jaw screws. Never yet has any part come out. No way a scroll chuck can be tightened that much without distorting the scroll.

... any clues as to what body this Big head will be mounted on??
The body looks like 3" (75 mm) Al pipe, just guessing as I didn't pull up Standard Pipe Dimensions. Either schedule 80 or schedule 160 or possibly DOM, not sure & my customer avoided my questions :thinking:

We did discuss Ti but cost of material is high & machining time is long, easily 8 hours. Plus the customer's share of required tooling that I don't have. And the poor thermal path, etc. Aluminum is more than strong enough at this wall thickness.


FWIW the first op was skim cutting. Second op was drilling part way through with a 1 5/8" (41 mm) twist drill, no pilot hole needed. Then reduce diameter for the neck part & cut off on the band saw. Flip the part around, pack the jaws with heavy manila file folder paper to protect the turned finish & drill with the spade drill before boring to size.
 
Last edited:

gadget_lover

Flashaholic
Joined
Oct 7, 2003
Messages
7,148
Location
Near Silicon Valley (too near)
Only those who've BTDT can truly appreciate how messy it is to core out a large chuck of aluminum.

I could not agree more. One of the first lessons I learned when making flashlights was the value of "near net" stock when using a small lathe. It was impressive how much swarf one creates when making a 4 inch long flashlight from an oversized solid rod of 6061. That was the experience that started my habit of designing to match the available materials, and to stock a wide array of bars and tubes.

Dan
 

DrafterDan

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Jul 28, 2013
Messages
1,317
Location
Phoenix, AZ
Some clean work there, in spite of the amount of curls created! I gotta say, that is one big dog boring bar.
I didn't know those spade bits existed, but I already see the value of having them.
 

precisionworks

Flashaholic
Joined
Apr 19, 2007
Messages
6,623
Location
Benton Illinois
... I didn't know those spade bits existed, but I already see the value of having them.
They're a niche tool (like much of what I use) & do a nice job in certain ops. The best method is drilling from solid & this tool needs no pilot hole to punch through 6061 or 7075 alloy. EBay purchase, $30 including a new spade insert, MT4 taper shank so it fits directly into my tailstock ram.

I looked into purchasing a new spade drill for roughing out Ti-6-4 tubes but the tool (new) was $250 + inserts. Free trial as long as the factory rep is there to watch & suggest feeds, speed, etc. If it works they expect the customer to purchase the tool, if not they take the tool back without charge. Not a bad deal. Surface finish varies widely, about 50 Ra with this tool in aluminum but only 150 Ra in 4140HT or Ti-6-4. That means it looks like ruts in a gravel road :crackup:

Allied Machine & Engineering Corporation (AMEC, Dover, Ohio, USA) is the largest domestic supplier & an eBay search for "AMEC spade drill" brings up over 1,000 listings. The "Original TA" is available from .374" to 4.5" (10 mm - 115 mm). You'll want to study the online AMEC catalog because you"ll need:



Spades are older technology & the newer tools are known as "indexable carbide insert drills" - everybody has their own offering, Iscar, SECO, Sumitomo, Komet, et al. They are really pricey, even at eBay. Some of the local CNC shops run them & swear by them for jobs that run 24/7 for a few weeks at a time.
 

Attachments

  • TADrill.jpg
    TADrill.jpg
    53.2 KB · Views: 76
Last edited:
Top