Binocular or monocular?

Tommy.Bolin

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Hi folks,
So I have to buy a new binocular. I will use it for hiking, camping and for trips. My colleague said that he bought monocular and that it's more useful to him than binocular, that he can take pictures with it as well. So now I don't know what to buy, binocular or monocular. He excited me with this monocular, there are a lot of useful accessories in the set as well. I think it would be fun for me and the kids to take zoomed pictures with it. He bought it on Amazon and he told me I can get a 20% discount for this monocular here: AIPNIS

So my question: What do you think I should buy? anyone have experiences with monoculars?

thanks :)
 
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archimedes

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Hello and welcome to CPF

Your post above has been approved, in lightly edited form

The commercial links were removed however, thank you for your understanding
 

P_A_S_1

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I take a cheap pair of binoculars hiking. Tried a monocular on my last hike but i didn't care for them. To me binoculars are much more pleasant to view with.
 

Monocrom

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Monocular all the way, for me. The really good ones come awfully close to $500. But no need to go that high. Main thing for me is that a monocular takes up less space and is lighter than a pair of binocs, while doing the exact same job.
 
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Kestrel

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This was click bait.
I very much agree with you, smelled fishy from the get-go; the product page even had an Amazon 'review' (& a positive one, at that :rolleyes:) from a "Tom" who also used similar broken, ungrammatic English.
Giving the OP the benefit of the doubt for now, but rest assured this will go :poof: if we see more of the same. :)
 
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KITROBASKIN

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Monocular is more efficient for our use, but would not recommend for extended (long duration) viewing. Sometimes I will switch eyes while using but that can be disruptive.
 

Cyclops942

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I'll go with a monocular all day long. Less weight and less volume, so it's easier to pack and use, whether you're going for a light walk through the neighborhood, a multi-week trek on the Appalachian Trail, or just tossing it in the glove box as a "just in case" item.
 

DaveTheDude

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I've used both, and the choice of which to take depends on the goals for the trip. If you're doing some climbing, a monocular allows one-handed scouting of handholds. Wildlife viewing or hunting, binoculars yield superior results, with enhanced depth perception as a bonus. If traveling with kids, see which they respond to best. Weight considerations will add another element to the calculus. In the end, go with what works best for you.
 

Patriot

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If minimum size and weight are top priority, then the monocular will allow a magnified view in the smallest possible package. I often carry one on long distance or high altitude hikes, where every ounce counts and where I can do without the added benefits of a binocular. As long as you have two eyes, a binocular will simply provide more detail, a 3D image, better depth of field, less fatigue and is steadier to handhold, assuming the instruments are of similar optical quality. Going from a 8x25 monocular to a 8x25 binocular will result in an instrument that's 2x-3X larger and heavier. A good example would be a monocular that weighs 4-5oz vs. a binocular that weight 10-13oz. Another thing to keep in mind is that the binocular will usually cost twice the price, all other things being equal but this is usually becomes more of an issue if you're buying top tier sporting optics.

More than anything else, it really depends on what the intended purpose is. If you just need something to I.D. objects that are already in view, read a sign or trail marker, read a license plate, a distant sign, or a house address, the monocular will likely accomplish most of those things fairly well. One caveat would be if you end up viewing through a monocular for any length of time because eye fatigue will eventually become an issue. I use a monocular and spotting scope with both eyes open (no squinting) and it's still fatiguing if you do it for long enough. The monocular is inferior for locating/finding objects, animals and people within a landscape and it takes the brain longer to figure out what it's looking at. If you're searching or scanning for things, yet still need a small instrument, just go for a 8x20, 8x22 or 8x25 binocular.

If you don't mind carrying a 16-20oz optic, a 8x30 or 8x32 binocular will accomplish just about anything a handheld binocular is capable of. Since there's been more research and development put into this class of instrument, by so many different manufacturers, there's a greater chance of finding something in your price range that still provides satisfactory performance.

A little background on my optics use. I'm a member of a local birding chapter and spend a lot of time identifying species, from my back patio to the hiking trail. I've been a western archery hunter for about 26 years and spent countless hour behind optics of every class and price range. This usually involves hiking long distances to remote areas, then stopping to "glass" large expanses of wilderness, often from a tripod. I currently own over 20 binoculars and 7 spotting scope/monoculars but over the years I estimate that I've had in my possession, 75+ different sporting optics, not including rifle scopes.
 
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