Butter and Bread and Sandwiches Oh My! (II)

pnwoutdoors

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Anybody got any tips on turning bananas into beverages? Any other ways to eat them?
Doc (and friends) say eat bananas. I just don't like bananas. But I'm willing to try them in a smoothie or some other form.

Bananas can be great in a smoothie. But you'll have to moderate the amount of bananas, if the taste is a turn-off for you.

Try this, in a blender: 1/2 to 1 banana, 1C mixed berries, 1 juice from lime (or lemon), 1/2 to 1C yogurt, 1/2 avocado, 1/2C pomegranate juice, 2C milk (or nut/soy milk). The berries, citrus juice and pomegranate juice will "cut" the flavor of the banana. Can add a leaf or two of kale, chard or a handful of spinach leaves, and/or a carrot, for more vitamins and flavor. Adjust the combinations, to taste, and for the volume of your blender's jug. (Makes several servings, with these amounts.)

I typically do this type of smoothie daily, for at least one of the meals. Nutritious, good mix of fats/proteins/carbs.


As for other ways to eat bananas, try grilling them. Cut into 1/2" thick slices, they can easily be cooked in the oven on the "broil" setting. they'll brown and caramelize on the outside. Be sure to flip them mid-way through, with tongs. I've found it helps moderate the "banana" taste and smell, reducing some of the pungency. Squeeze a lime over the slices, after they've come out of the oven. Can easily serve with chopped nuts, yogurt, mixed berries. Can grill several bananas like this, then (once cooled) freeze the slices in a ZipLoc freezer bag.
 

bykfixer

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Thanks for the ideas pnw.

When I posed that question I was in dire strates after a plague of muscle cramps called side stitches, spasms of the lower abdomen and cramping shoulder blades. Someone suggested bananas and I was willing to try it out even though up to that point I had never liked the soft textured fruit. Some people can swallow a big chunk of steak but not a pill, I couldn't swallow that mushy banana stuff.
After a couple of days I got past that and now enjoy a banana each day.

Not quite sure what was causing the muscle issue or what solved it really, but I honestly think the daily banana helped.
 

Poppy

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Dinner started out like this:
1661641475003.png


An 8 pack of Primio Sweet Italian Sausage,
A bag of frozen sliced bell peppers,
A sweet vadalia onion
Salt, Italian Seasoning, garlic, and a little olive oil.
A couple of ounces of Port wine for flavor, and sweetness.

I cooked the Sausages on the grill, and the veggies in a pan.
I married them together for a few minutes, and shared them with the dog.

1661641710024.png


He was a happy camper.
 

ledbetter

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Dinner started out like this:
View attachment 31347

An 8 pack of Primio Sweet Italian Sausage,
A bag of frozen sliced bell peppers,
A sweet vadalia onion
Salt, Italian Seasoning, garlic, and a little olive oil.
A couple of ounces of Port wine for flavor, and sweetness.

I cooked the Sausages on the grill, and the veggies in a pan.
I married them together for a few minutes, and shared them with the dog.

View attachment 31348

He was a happy camper.
FYI onions are toxic to dogs.
 

bykfixer

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5E370762-8A0E-45ED-A91F-FE94C798CCDE.jpeg

This rascal preferred his onions fried with potatos.
He ate magnolia tree leaves and flowers, heaven knows how much chocolate candy he'd steal off the kitchen counter, grapes, cigarette butts, a loaf of bread, an entire box of pop tarts, wash cloths, paint chips, an entire frisbee, a brick, roof shingles, and who knows what else. He lived to be 12. Arthritis in his spine and hips caused him to go lame.
 

bykfixer

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Today's dinner was to thaw some $5 rib eyes I bought in July, sprinkle on a bit of Lawreys seasoning salt, rub it in, sprinkle some more, let sit at room temperature for 15 minutes while I got the table top Smokey Joe lava hot with about 50 charcoal briquets. Toss them bad boys on and all that marble quickly caught fire. Five minutes on each side and done.
Mashed potatoes with garlic and butter off to the side.....yum yum.
Spring water to drink.
5B22F521-4177-4295-A0EC-1E898F14453E.jpeg
 

Poppy

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FYI onions are toxic to dogs.
I didn't know that.
I am surprised at how many things dogs are not allowed to eat.

Actually, like Mr. Fixer's dog, we had to baby proof our house, because this guy likes to chew on anything plastic. He chews on some plants we have outside that the deer love, (I think they are mildly toxic) sometimes he'll eat grass and then puke it out, or it comes out the other end.

I'll have to add onions to the list of things he is not allowed to eat. Fortunately I only gave him some sausage, no veggies.
 

bykfixer

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And grapes Poppy. Some dogs can tolerate a grape or two but most get real sick if only eating one. There's some chemical that murders their kidneys or something.
I did not know that when I tossed one to my 8 week old puppy who gobbled it up. The Mrs called on the phone shortly after. I said "hey the new dog loves grapes"...."WHAT, NOOOOOO THAT's VERY BAD FOR DOGS" she hollers.

Uh oh, I killed the new dog, dratz. "But that one time Onyx stole the whole bag off the kitchen counter" I thought.

The new dog puked it up a bit later. Phew!
 

pnwoutdoors

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No dressing. No cheese. Later in the week I’ll add generous amount of Honey Mustard bc it gets tougher to put down.

View attachment 31371

Try finding a really good balsamic vinegar. A bit of mustard, some herbs with a kick, a dash of your favorite combination of spices, and a splashing of a good balsamic ... yum. Can make even the most-tiresome salad wake up.

Adding a few different pickled (or fermented) vegetables can also do the trick. (Can easily do DIY at home, or can find in some specialty groceries.) Lots of nutrients, and it'll add "zing" to any salad.
 

kerneldrop

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I’d rather be miserable when I eat.
I chant eat for purpose not for pleasure before every bite. Haha

It’s about to be meat and potatoes season. I haven’t decided what I’m going to do yet…I’m either going to gain 30lbs or lose 10lbs.
 

pnwoutdoors

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I’d rather be miserable when I eat.
I chant eat for purpose not for pleasure before every bite. Haha

Yeah. A good balsamic will help with that, to break down your resolve. :D

Of course, an exceptional balsamic will bum you out all over again. Darned things can get expensive.

For example:
 

knucklegary

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And grapes Poppy. Some dogs can tolerate a grape or two but most get real sick if only eating one. There's some chemical that murders their kidneys or something.
I did not know that when I tossed one to my 8 week old puppy who gobbled it up. The Mrs called on the phone shortly after. I said "hey the new dog loves grapes"...."WHAT, NOOOOOO THAT's VERY BAD FOR DOGS" she hollers.

Uh oh, I killed the new dog, dratz. "But that one time Onyx stole the whole bag off the kitchen counter" I thought.

The new dog puked it up a bit later. Phew!
My JR loved grapes and prunes. Only to find out later it can be toxic.. Man, that sure takes the fun out of chasing after rolling grapes
 

knucklegary

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Now I know why this stuff is always on sale. There should be a sign "eat at your own risk"

IMG_20220829_120214506_HDR.jpg

Instead of eating raw in salads. I chopped into a beef stew and let simmer.. It was very good that way, and not over cooked killing all the nutritional value
 

kerneldrop

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@knucklegary - do you remove the rib running down the middle? You gotta get rid of that.
I'm cooking brussel sprouts tonight...it's in the Kale family

You have to eat it raw to full embrace your new raw vegetarian lifestyle
 

knucklegary

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Kernel, Oh you bet! That center rib can be used to make training straps.. lol
Sorry I don't own a rabbit or guinea pig to eat all the trimmings
 
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pnwoutdoors

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Now I know why this stuff is always on sale. There should be a sign "eat at your own risk"

View attachment 31407
Instead of eating raw in salads. I chopped into a beef stew and let simmer.. It was very good that way, and not over cooked killing all the nutritional value

If your family is the sort that still has one of those "jugs" of used bacon/frying grease, you can simply place a small dollup of the stuff in a pan, then heat your kale that way. Sprinkle with some herbs and red pepper flakes ... and voila. Masks much of the earthy, bitter taste, and doesn't need to be cooked very long to do so. Still quite nutritious. (Except for the 7yr old bacon grease, I mean.)

One trick I do: reserve a couple of small containers of bone broth, whenever I make it. These, I use for smaller cooking situations like yours. Adds a good bit of savory, can work with meats, eggs, veggies, and can easily be flavored with onions, garlic, herbs, spices.

You could try a different kale, as well. There are some varieties of smooth-leaf kale that have a much-reduced bitterness and are milder in terms of the earthy flavor. Easily grown, as well. Try Lacinato (aka "dinosaur") kale, in the stores. Or plant a Portuguese smooth-leaf (perennial) kale in the garden. Any of these, torn off the stiff inner rib and into smaller pieces, end up making decent-tasting salad leaves.
 

knucklegary

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We usually cook with olive and canola oil. And, keep empty peanut butter jars for beef or chicken stock.
If it's Portuguese kale that has the blood red stalk, I was thinking of trying some next time.
 
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