can 220v led be used on 110v?

grahaminvictoria

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Well, that is pretty straight forward! thanks!

I imagine there is little use here in North America then...

thanks for your assistance. Graham
 

LEDninja

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ebay and dx do not have the best deals in LED lightbulbs at this time when you factor in the quality of the light and quality of the bulb re bulb life. The ebay bulb may last you 1 year if you fid a 115VAC version. The good lightbulbs last 3 years 24/7 and over 10 years when used 3-4 hours a day.
So you need 10*$8=$80 (inc. shipping) to equal 1 $25 Philips 9W over the next 10 years.
At this time your local hardware store have very good deals. See my post here for a list:
http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb...uy-LED-bulbs&p=3643092&viewfull=1#post3643092
In addition Costco sells a 3-pack of 8W Sylavnia for C$70. Canadian Tire still wants $40 per.
Stay away from Walmart Canada at this time. The US DOE sued them and Lights Of America for false advertising and there are class action lawsuits pending. Walmart USA has started to carry other brands and shipped their ebay quality lights north.
 
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PhotonWrangler

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If there is no regulation circuity inside, you can try it on a 110v circuit and the worst that will happen is that it will light dimly or not at all. However if the lamp contains a regulator, it's hard to predict how it will act with an input voltage below it's rated voltage. The worst case is that the regulator could overheat and burn out.
 

ruskiantonov

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Hi all,

I am reviving this post in the hopes that some one might help me with a technical question.

I bought to sconces in Europe and had a friend send them to me, they no longer sell them here for 120v spec because the company didn’t decertify UL (I think). I really want to use them as they match some of my other things (design) in my bathroom. They are called Kartell Rifly sconces.

I took them apart and it’s printed 220-240v on the circuit board. The board contains 18 LEDs.

I want to mount 2 on a single J-box 120v

is there a way to convert them? I’m willing to do some soldering or hand over to a professional that can alter them. I’ve done quiet a bit of research in terms of components on the circuit board but still having a hard time making sense of what would need to be replaced to make them 120v compatible. Dimming capability is also a consideration.

let me know if you can help, thank you.
 

Dave_H

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Hi all,

I am reviving this post in the hopes that some one might help me with a technical question.

I bought to sconces in Europe and had a friend send them to me, they no longer sell them here for 120v spec because the company didn’t decertify UL (I think). I really want to use them as they match some of my other things (design) in my bathroom. They are called Kartell Rifly sconces.

I took them apart and it’s printed 220-240v on the circuit board. The board contains 18 LEDs.

I want to mount 2 on a single J-box 120v

is there a way to convert them? I’m willing to do some soldering or hand over to a professional that can alter them. I’ve done quiet a bit of research in terms of components on the circuit board but still having a hard time making sense of what would need to be replaced to make them 120v compatible. Dimming capability is also a consideration.

let me know if you can help, thank you.

Lamps might be possible to modify but probably not practical and has safety and insurance implications. Doubtful it would operate correctly on lower voltage if not spec'ed for it. Modification would invalidate any certification it may have.

There may exist a small power supply to boost 120vac to 240vac which fits your power and size requirements. How much power does each lamp use?

It may be possible to replace the LED driver with one with 120vac input. Sounds like it may be on the same board as the LEDs? If so, not likely possible. Some LED ceiling lamps I have opened have drivers which could be replaced, others are partially integrated mechanically and would be more difficult. In any case it adds up to substantial cost and effort.


Dave
 

adnj

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This depends. Many LED lighting circuits are voltage flexible - particularly if they are meant to be used commercially. I regularly see 120V/208V/230V single phase fixtures.

18 LEDS requires about 90V DC to drive them in series. You may have a light that works with 120V but pulls a bit more current than at 230V. I would try that before considering a step-up transformer.

Another option is US 240V single-phase. It works if the device has no need for a neutral wire to ground connection. It is common to run European motors and heaters this way in the USA. But you really need to know what you are doing at the breaker panel for proper wiring and breaker sizing.

Sent from my LG-V520 using Tapatalk
 

Dave_H

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Series string of 18 white LEDs at around 3v each would require ~54v, maybe a bit higher up to 60v; assuming that's what it is; could be 2x9 at half the voltage. In any case the driver takes care of this, within its specified input range. Not sure where 90vdc comes from.

Operating with input voltage below spec might work but not a good idea on continuous basis. CC LEDs represent a constant-power load so ac input current needs to be higher which may over-stress components (e.g. ripple current rating of input capacitors) and lead to shorter life or worse.

Most laptop power and other switching wallplug adapters these days take 100-240vac input. It's good for "international" product where the only difference is cord/plug. LED drivers exist with this range or greater. I have a small Fulham driver with 100-277vac input. OP's appears not to be this (from outer spec).

As for wiring to 220vac, yes N.A. residences should be able to, as 220 is used for dryers, stoves, heaters, battery chargers etc; but is it worth the worth the trouble and expense? Not sure about other countries, and where OP resides.

Dave
 
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JustAnOldFashionedLEDGuy

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The bulb is <$9.00 USD. Unless you bought a bunch of them, just toss it and order the proper voltage.


It is a waste of time to discuss any other option as no retrofit of any sort is justified at that price.


Toss it and move on.
 

Dave_H

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The bulb is <$9.00 USD. Unless you bought a bunch of them, just toss it and order the proper voltage.


It is a waste of time to discuss any other option as no retrofit of any sort is justified at that price.


Toss it and move on.


Original topic in this old thread was cheap LED bulbs but recently jumped topic to some wall sconces which probably have more value; not enough details from OP. In the end you may be right though.

I had some antique wall sconces and chandelier rewired to code, for safety and insurance purposes, cost a fair bit but worth it.

Dave
 

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