cardboard "bread tags"

raggie33

*the raggedier*
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im the king of when i want to loosen the wire ones i tighten them and vice versa can you belive im single ?
 

F89

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I'm uncertain as to what a grunt dud is but I get the feeling it's meant to be derogatory towards either me or anyone who has agreed with me, or both?
Either way it's of no consequence.

The friction between you pair is funny but not ha ha funny.
 

the_real_chud

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Oregon
You really try and use those useless little clips
Open the bag, throw away the twist tie or plastic clip or cardboard clip or whatever. Remove desired amount of bread, spin bag, put bread down with excess bag underneath to avoid twist coming undone.
 
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F89

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You really try and use those useless little clips
Open the bag, throw away the twist tie or plastic clip or cardboard clip or whatever. Remove desired amount of bread, spin bag, put bread down with excess bag underneath to avoid twist coming undone.
Admittedly that's what I do most of the time.
 

KITROBASKIN

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F89, your comment was accurately applied sarcasm and commentary about our world today. A thread about bread clips is destined to derail don't you think? The fact that I used your aside does not cast aspersion towards you.
 
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Dave_H

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I save metal twisties for re-use also. I suppose you could make one of those potato chip bag clips work for a bag of bread as well.
I re-use small wire twist ties but don't see many; many more are thicker ones from coffee bags, which are overkill for small bags, so get used with larger ones in the freezer.

Typical plastic tag weighs about 1/3 gram versus 5-6 grams for the polyethylene bag they seal, the latter not mainly recyclable in Ottawa (city of over 1M). One grocery chain (Metro) accepts bags for recycling at some stores. Where they end up is another story, and it's a fraction of the total.

I have hundreds of plastic tags, about a 750g jar full, can just swap out the cardboard ones. Original idea was people dealing with multiple network or coaxial cables could attach these tags to identify which is which.

Dave
 

Dave_H

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Scientific article describing rare danger of ingesting plastic bread clips causing death, and that using cardboard prevents that rare occurrence.
As for the child swallowing hazard, this might be a secondary reason, but certainly not the one used for the broader single-use plastic item ban (forks/knives/spoons, cups, grocery bags, drinking straws...). There are plenty of other small objects of potentially same/worse harm, such as button and coin cells.


Dave
 

Dave_H

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As for the child swallowing hazard, this might be a secondary reason, but certainly not the one used for the broader single-use plastic item ban (forks/knives/spoons, cups, grocery bags, drinking straws...). There are plenty of other small objects of potentially same/worse harm, such as button and coin cells.


Dave
A related but not unexpected side-effect of the single-use ban in Canada is availability of forks/knives/spoons made of thin wood. Instead of plastic production from oil, we'll be killing more trees, oh well. Looks like no way around this, or is there...

At home metal cutlery is used; with minor re-use of plastic ones, those sturdy enough.

I can hardly wait for cardboard single-use cutlery...perhaps it's out there now!

Dave
 

ghostguy6

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Ed, Ab
Scientific article describing rare danger of ingesting plastic bread clips causing death, and that using cardboard prevents that rare occurrence.

I was curios about this so I put one of those cardboard bread clips into some water last night and let it soak. It took approximately 15 minutes to become soft enough to begin to break down. At 18 minutes the layers of paper began to separate. Given that the tags were exposed to more water than is found in an adults mouth and still took 15 minutes to break down I would say the choking factor is not at play here. If it takes 3 minutes to go unconscious without oxygen and brain damage can occur at 4 minutes then at 15 minutes it is already too late. Granted wet cardboard might result in less damage to the airway when being removed vs a harder plastic.
A related but not unexpected side-effect of the single-use ban in Canada is availability of forks/knives/spoons made of thin wood. Instead of plastic production from oil, we'll be killing more trees, oh well. Looks like no way around this, or is there...
Those wood knives are useless for cutting your food or spreading margarine on your toast. The forks break all the time. There even have been a few cases of people getting splinters in their mouth from the bamboo cutlery. I throw the wood cutlery away before I even use it. I the plastic was better because in the long run you at least got a useful product that was used once.
 
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