Cars, Man

knucklegary

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I think the original Morris Minor "Woody" is one of the coolest little cars to come out of Britain.
Back during that time there was a MG Sprite motor conversion that not only made them faster but more reliable. The only problem was stopping.. With tiny drum brakes, drivers and passenger had to carry change of knickers (-;
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Monocrom

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im weird i even like mini vans. i want my car to be a home just incase
Sounds like an Econoline van, converted with a bed and a few other touches would be ideal for you. GM makes them too. You should check out "Van Life" videos on YouTube to get some ideas about the type of conversions others have done. Ironically in that department, you're not that weird at all.
 

Monocrom

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I think the original Morris Minor "Woody" is one of the coolest little cars to come out of Britain.
Back during that time there was a MG Sprite motor conversion that not only made them faster but more reliable. The only problem was stopping.. With tiny drum brakes, drivers and passenger had to carry change of knickers (-;
View attachment 29778
There is the Chrysler PT Cruiser with the Morris Minor Traveller paneling. Not the same in terms of function. But if you want the looks....
 

KITROBASKIN

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166 miles per hour in the last straight. Fascinating to see the brake/throttle indicators and the course path.

$90,000 worth of electric beautiful cutting edge extreme.

What kind of record was that? electric series production vehicle? Are there other machines that can go faster on that course?
 

orbital

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..

What kind of record was that? electric series production vehicle? Are there other machines that can go faster on that course?
+

Yes & yes
Hybrid prototype race cars with alot of aero, will go far faster.

Porsche 919 Hybrid has the outright record on Nurburgring Nordschleife
It has technology that makes f1 nervous. The car unfortunately is no longer raced.

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orbital

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These hybrid race cars, they are liquid fuel and electric?
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New as of this year; the FIA Hypercar class LMDh, can be literally anything you want in power as long as it's 500 kW (670 hp) or less.
Can be hybrid electric (liquid fuel), ICE only, flux capacitor,, whatever.

That sounds underpowered, but they weigh very little & that's everything.
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
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Aug 11, 2003
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im still hopeing i can swing the chevy volt. i want the most basic car they make. that i can depend on.. and i want a 5 speed
 

Monocrom

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Keep in mind, the infrastructure for such vehicles doesn't exist in America. Gas stations common as dirt. Fill up and go in less than 5 minutes. Can't do that with electric vehicles.
 

idleprocess

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Keep in mind, the infrastructure for such vehicles doesn't exist in America.
Most homes in America already have - or can have - one of the most important pieces of EV infrastructure: the 14-50 outlet capable of providing hundreds of miles of range overnight or a multiple of what most people drive daily. This isn't of as much use to apartment dwellers, but given that EV manufacturers are supply constrained being limited to the mere ⅔ of Americans that live in single-family detached homes - nearly all of which have off-street parking - isn't exactly a stumbling block.

Gas stations common as dirt. Fill up and go in less than 5 minutes. Can't do that with electric vehicles.
While not as common as gas stations, public EV L2 / fast chargers are becoming widespread.
Heck I live in one of the regional capitals of truckistan and there are two Volta stations at the nearby grocery store.

Fast charging is indeed more than a 5-minute affair, but for most EV drivers it's either something they do occasionally when road-tripping or running long errands so that 20-30 minutes to recover 60-80% isn't a serious imposition.
 

Monocrom

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Most homes in America already have - or can have - one of the most important pieces of EV infrastructure: the 14-50 outlet capable of providing hundreds of miles of range overnight or a multiple of what most people drive daily. This isn't of as much use to apartment dwellers, but given that EV manufacturers are supply constrained being limited to the mere ⅔ of Americans that live in single-family detached homes - nearly all of which have off-street parking - isn't exactly a stumbling block.


While not as common as gas stations, public EV L2 / fast chargers are becoming widespread.
Heck I live in one of the regional capitals of truckistan and there are two Volta stations at the nearby grocery store.

Fast charging is indeed more than a 5-minute affair, but for most EV drivers it's either something they do occasionally when road-tripping or running long errands so that 20-30 minutes to recover 60-80% isn't a serious imposition.
The problem with home charging is that you have to remember each day to plug it in. That's a hassle. Forget one day.... That's going to be a very embarrassing phone call to work. "Hi boss. I won't be coming in today. The reason?...." (Not everyone can bum rides off of family members and friends each time they forget. And to this day, public transportation in most parts of America is an absolute joke.)

Another issue, sometimes the car just won't charge up. I've looked into this. No one is 100% sure why it happens. It happens with home charging, it's even worse with Charging Stations. The charging aspect itself isn't actually reliable. (Of course those making EV vehicles to sell will never admit that.)

As far as the infrastructure, goes it's still not close to where it needs to be. Yes, it's being set up in quite a few places. But as of right now, not even remotely close to competing with the sheer number of gas stations out there. Especially in more remote areas.

Also, not just the number. Those charging stations absolutely need actual fast chargers. There are a tiny number of charging stations in the UK that are 700. But even there, those are alarmingly rare! Very few charging stations there also. And what they do have in place, less than 10% are truly fast charging stations.

America needs charging stations as plentiful as gas stations are now. And, those charging stations need to be done properly. What's being put in place initially isn't going to cut it. Gas stations, in and out in literally less than 5 minutes; easily! Charging stations? Sit and wait in your vehicle for half an hour. Get an up to 80% charge at best, and hope that the particular one you pulled up will even charge at all. I'm sorry, that's not good enough. People will never embrace a new way of doing something, on a mass scale, if it's significantly less convenient than the old way of doing things that they are used to.
 

Monocrom

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I thought that is was going to be around $65,000 .... still not intended for the masses. But considerably less than its Tesla competition.
Well, with EV vehicles you need to take advantage of government grants and programs that lower the cost of such vehicles to consumers. That way they actually become affordable to Middle-class families.
 

aznsx

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Apr 24, 2015
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Phoenix, AZ USA
Most homes in America already have - or can have - one of the most important pieces of EV infrastructure: the 14-50 outlet capable of providing hundreds of miles of range overnight or a multiple of what most people drive daily. This isn't of as much use to apartment dwellers, but given that EV manufacturers are supply constrained being limited to the mere ⅔ of Americans that live in single-family detached homes - nearly all of which have off-street parking - isn't exactly a stumbling block.

My question is: Even given the affordable Model T, how long would have been required for the automobile to effectively completely replace the horse for personal transportation if 1/3 of the population had been completely unable to utilize them? (Never mind the fact that the horse couldn't come close to matching the automobile functionally, whereas the ICE auto is a at least a match for an EV's capabilities in most respects.)

My answer is: Don't start capping off any oil wells just yet y'all. Without a place to plug it in, there IS no option, and that shouldn't be expected to change for that 1/3 any time soon - supply constraints and other factors aside. All's well and fine for the other 2/3 if they choose to go that route, but gasoline stations aren't going anywhere in my lifetime, nor likely that of people born today!

Edit: The only 'issue' I have with EVs is my working to make money to pay higher taxes to subsidize those who can use them through incentives to artificially advance their progress when I can't use them.
 
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