Cordless power tools

ven

ven

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All original except a few of the drill bits.
View attachment 28231
Same charger👊🏻 so you rate Milwaukee? I don’t think can go wrong with dewalt or Milwaukee myself . Don’t have an m12 drill, but a couple of jobs a work friend has and had to get my dewalt to drill. But a fair difference in voltage and it’s 95nm to. Hardly used it though in area I’ve been working 🤦🏻‍♂️ . Dewalt impact and drill(2sp at home) again as new in.
Sat there 🤦🏻‍♂️
 
bykfixer

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It came with a spare battery and a coupon for a $0 third battery. Each battery has probably been cycled 100 times since the Mrs uses it as much as I do.
When I was hanging peg board in my metal shed I probably drilled 75-100 1/8" holes through 1/8" (approx 3.2mm) thick steel on one of the ten year old batteries.
The Mrs drill holes in glass and on some it takes 20-30 minutes. She can do two or three per battery charge.
Can it loosen a lug nut on a car? Probably not. But for household uses it's great.
 
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Lynx_Arc

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The light looks like a similar design to dewalts DCL050. I think Dewalt has a small compact 20v.
IMO Milwaukee vs Dewalt is a coin toss with Milwaukee having more options but often more costly. I do like the 12V more compact battery design but having dealt with the batteries takes getting used to as they are often harder to remove from tools and yes I'm sure they have 18650s in them like the Dewalt 12v but different style case for their batteries.
 
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ven

ven

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The light looks like a similar design to dewalts DCL050. I think Dewalt has a small compact 20v.
IMO Milwaukee vs Dewalt is a coin toss with Milwaukee having more options but often more costly. I do like the 12V more compact battery design but having dealt with the batteries takes getting used to as they are often harder to remove from tools and yes I'm sure they have 18650s in them like the Dewalt 12v but different style case for their batteries.
I’m quite impressed so far with the m12 stuff. It’s enough for work, yet a few years back wouldn’t have even thought 12v. No doubt on a proper hard test the 20v dewalt 5ah will last longer . But truth is, I don’t need to be impacting for 2hrs solid. Other than the crazy size long reach 3/8 m12, the impact driver is compact and fairly light. Feels solid though and brushless being a bonus. Batteries are cheaper but then less to them (less cells).
If worked in a garage, I think Milwaukee defo have the edge with m12. Well dewalt don’t offer the ratchets in 1/4,3/8 and 1/2 anyway.
 
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Lynx_Arc

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I’m quite impressed so far with the m12 stuff. It’s enough for work, yet a few years back wouldn’t have even thought 12v. No doubt on a proper hard test the 20v dewalt 5ah will last longer . But truth is, I don’t need to be impacting for 2hrs solid. Other than the crazy size long reach 3/8 m12, the impact driver is compact and fairly light. Feels solid though and brushless being a bonus. Batteries are cheaper but then less to them (less cells).
If worked in a garage, I think Milwaukee defo have the edge with m12. Well dewalt don’t offer the ratchets in 1/4,3/8 and 1/2 anyway.
Actually DW offers 12V ratchets now in 1/4 and 3/8 at least and 20v also and they have been tested on Torque channel on youtube and do very well vs MW. Over time I'm seeing DW pretty much catching MW on 12V tool line with exceptions here and there. 20V tools do offer at times more power under heavier loads but for light to less than extreme use and short time usage they can suffice. I prefer the 20V as I don't really want to invest in a lot of 12V batteries also for some tools and for tools I need 5+ AH power like saws and hammer drills and long running lights I have separate batteries for. I already have a second tool platform combining Black & Decker with Porter Cable tools that I'm trying to get out of as they are no longer readily available in local stores and no new tools have been made in years now so a dead end line.

I've been watching an endless stream of new tools on several tool channels on youtube to the point I quit watching them because the market of tools is going insane these days so many new versions of the same tool.... every 4-6 months DW has put out a new impact or a new drill and other brands have done similar such that my stuff is about 20% less powerful than it was when I got it. I am pretty much ok with waiting for a tool that I don't need now but want to get to the point it is available and/or I like it enough. Batteries also have been evolving with up to 15Ah batteries (18650 DW) and 12AH

Makita is also making some inroads but I'm not totally into their line of 40V tools that competes with their 20V tools that doesn't have a huge advantage in power plus the 40V batteries require 10 cells. Flex also has a decent tool line that is expanding and could compete more completely with DW/MW tools and there is Kobalt and Ridgid and Ryobi out there
all competing. Ryobi (to me) looks very interesting as they have some really unique 20V tool offerings other platforms don't have at this time that could be of use for me but I don't care for their battery design at all, they should sell an adapter for cheap and lose the tower insert part for a flat top pack.

In other words you could ends up with a half dozen platforms just to have odd tools you like or wait for (often a long while) for your current platform to offer them. I have BD yard tools still (string trimmer, hedge trimmer, blower) that I use every time I do yard work and DW offerings in that line would cost me about $400 and I have about $100 total in my stuff including a few batteries. I would love to have a dozen more 20V tools like a right angle grinder, a rotary hammer drill, a palm sander, oscillating tool, the DCL50 flood light and the 1000W work light and other things.
 
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kaichu dento

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I got rid of my 12v Milwaukee stuff after getting into the Porter Cable 20v lineup, but that is also on the chopping block after slowly acquiring DeWalt replacements for most of them. The 18v Milwaukee tools I've used are great, but the 12v lineup was under powered too much of the time and I think of them as a good platform for many home users, but not for a job site.

One corded tool I don't envision replacing any time soon is my Makita HM1812.
Maxresdefault
 
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Lynx_Arc

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I got rid of my 12v Milwaukee stuff after getting into the Porter Cable 20v lineup, but that is also on the chopping block after slowly acquiring DeWalt replacements for most of them. The 18v Milwaukee tools I've used are great, but the 12v lineup was under powered too much of the time and I think of them as a good platform for many home users, but not for a job site.

One corded tool I don't envision replacing any time soon is my Makita HM1812.
View attachment 28339
The big hammers take too much juice to be cordless IMO although dewalt makes a larger one to go with the 60V 15Ah battery a tool that costs a ton of money isn't easily replaced.
 
bykfixer

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When you absolutely, postively have to have serious wrecking ability in a portable cordless tool

DF43B6B7 9A02 4C92 9C91 E38F58BBDCFC

Accept no substitutes……
And it's only 24 volts
 
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ven

ven

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Actually DW offers 12V ratchets now in 1/4 and 3/8 at least and 20v also and they have been tested on Torque channel on youtube and do very well vs MW. Over time I'm seeing DW pretty much catching MW on 12V tool line with exceptions here and there. 20V tools do offer at times more power under heavier loads but for light to less than extreme use and short time usage they can suffice. I prefer the 20V as I don't really want to invest in a lot of 12V batteries also for some tools and for tools I need 5+ AH power like saws and hammer drills and long running lights I have separate batteries for. I already have a second tool platform combining Black & Decker with Porter Cable tools that I'm trying to get out of as they are no longer readily available in local stores and no new tools have been made in years now so a dead end line.

I've been watching an endless stream of new tools on several tool channels on youtube to the point I quit watching them because the market of tools is going insane these days so many new versions of the same tool.... every 4-6 months DW has put out a new impact or a new drill and other brands have done similar such that my stuff is about 20% less powerful than it was when I got it. I am pretty much ok with waiting for a tool that I don't need now but want to get to the point it is available and/or I like it enough. Batteries also have been evolving with up to 15Ah batteries (18650 DW) and 12AH

Makita is also making some inroads but I'm not totally into their line of 40V tools that competes with their 20V tools that doesn't have a huge advantage in power plus the 40V batteries require 10 cells. Flex also has a decent tool line that is expanding and could compete more completely with DW/MW tools and there is Kobalt and Ridgid and Ryobi out there
all competing. Ryobi (to me) looks very interesting as they have some really unique 20V tool offerings other platforms don't have at this time that could be of use for me but I don't care for their battery design at all, they should sell an adapter for cheap and lose the tower insert part for a flat top pack.

In other words you could ends up with a half dozen platforms just to have odd tools you like or wait for (often a long while) for your current platform to offer them. I have BD yard tools still (string trimmer, hedge trimmer, blower) that I use every time I do yard work and DW offerings in that line would cost me about $400 and I have about $100 total in my stuff including a few batteries. I would love to have a dozen more 20V tools like a right angle grinder, a rotary hammer drill, a palm sander, oscillating tool, the DCL50 flood light and the 1000W work light and other things.
That’s good to know, will have to check out. I don’t keep up that often for a simple reason ……I will buy it 😂. But we are a bit behind as well. The new DW packs are coming out. No point for me, but a small light 5ah pack would be great in the size of a 2ah pack. Again though not until my batteries need replacing.
Well as I think, I would probably still chose Milwaukee simply to try out. Variety in ways and it’s not that I depend on any of them. Bare in mind maybe one other engineer in the whole plant has a driver and drill!!! Most simply use ratchets and hex keys, socket sets. But I’m a sucker for a drill or impact, especially as I’m in more areas (broad knowledge) so can be opening up guards and vessels with many bolts from m6 to m18.

Will check DW out now😂 . Any purchases is your fault 😝
 
ven

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Just had a look for the 12v DW ratchets, all US side and would need importing. $154 and $20 shipping then duty. So well over $200 .
Nice though, I don’t mind 12v stuff for 1/4 and 3/8 sizes. As I don’t want too much power on many fasteners basically . The 3/8 Milwaukee doesn’t get used past setting 2, often 4th as handy on older vessels with well worn threads(can’t easily helicoil them ). So this runs them up and stops at any resistance. Perfect for fitting doors, then gentle on setting 1 with a couple of hammer actions.
 
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Just had a look for the 12v DW ratchets, all US side and would need importing. $154 and $20 shipping then duty. So well over $200 .
Nice though, I don’t mind 12v stuff for 1/4 and 3/8 sizes. As I don’t want too much power on many fasteners basically . The 3/8 Milwaukee doesn’t get used past setting 2, often 4th as handy on older vessels with well worn threads(can’t easily helicoil them ). So this runs them up and stops at any resistance. Perfect for fitting doors, then gentle on setting 1 with a couple of hammer actions.
They just recently came on the market here I think so likely they will be available there in the future. Personally if I can fit it in there I just use a standard impact with an adapter and sockets to tighten things up and finishing with a regular wrench.
 
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vicv

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I have some Milwaukee 18v stuff. Bought it when I bought my house 9years ago. Batteries still work very well
 
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I have some Milwaukee 18v stuff. Bought it when I bought my house 9years ago. Batteries still work very well
Lithium ion batteries and do well that long for sure as I have some good batteries I pulled from laptop batteries.
I do still chuckle at milwaukee and their battery voltages which don't make sense. either they should say that they have 12v and 20v batteries or 10.8 and 18v batteries.
 
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Actually using 18v is correct. That’s 3.6v per cell which is the correct nominal voltage. 20 volt batteries would be 4V per cell nomimal. Which isn’t true. That’s just dewalt trying to make theirs sound better. Same as ryobi with their 40 volt batteries. They should be 36v. Egos 56v batteries are a 14s. That should be a 50.4V battery. Instead they go by 4V a cell. An ebike battery with 14s is called a 52v battery. But it’s the exact same as the ego. Different companies decide on whatever nominal voltage they feel like
 
Lynx_Arc

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Actually using 18v is correct. That’s 3.6v per cell which is the correct nominal voltage. 20 volt batteries would be 4V per cell nomimal. Which isn’t true. That’s just dewalt trying to make theirs sound better. Same as ryobi with their 40 volt batteries. They should be 36v. Egos 56v batteries are a 14s. That should be a 50.4V battery. Instead they go by 4V a cell. An ebike battery with 14s is called a 52v battery. But it’s the exact same as the ego. Different companies decide on whatever nominal voltage they feel like
Dewalt doesn't claim nominal on either their tools or batteries they have them marked MAX on both 12V and 20V.
Milwaukee is not consistent using 12V (max) and 18V (nominal). I know in other countries they require nominal voltage instead of max. Some tools are labeled 18V here and others 20V and there is no difference in them. Alkaleaks are labeled 1.5V which IMO isn't nominal because in medium use they don't keep that voltage. When the 24V batteries came out (Kobalt and now Flex) I had to think and realize they are 6 cell packs so at 3.6v that would be 21.6V.
I
BTW they sometimes use 3.7V per cell for nominal lithium ion packs that is why you see 7.4V packs. I've also seen 8.4V that would truly be max of 4.2V. I've measured 20V packs and they get about 20.5V or closer to 4.1V/cell.
A car battery is rechargeable and considered 12V nominal also. In other words "nominal" is just a term used that isn't applied equally across all batteries/chemistries/types but you have to know what battery and chemistry is it applicable to in order to decide if it is nominal or not.
 
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I agree. Which is why I’m wondering why in your last post, you claim that Milwaukee voltages don’t make sense. Now you’re saying it doesn’t matter because everyone’s standards are different. I agree with the latter and besides your previous post, we seem to be saying the same thing
 
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18V = 20V in cordless tools


it's like saying an 18650 is 4.2V by one manufacturer & 3.6V by another manufacturer.

where's the 28V impact driver hehe
 
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Poppy

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I agree. Which is why I’m wondering why in your last post, you claim that Milwaukee voltages don’t make sense. Now you’re saying it doesn’t matter because everyone’s standards are different. I agree with the latter and besides your previous post, we seem to be saying the same thing
I think he is saying that they are inconsistent. On one set of battery packs they are using minimal voltage, and the other battery packs, maximal voltage.
 
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