Cordless power tools

raggie33

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i have to small torque wrenches one was able to take lug nuts off a truck. this is amazeing to me
 

Lynx_Arc

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I think he is saying that they are inconsistent. On one set of battery packs they are using minimal voltage, and the other battery packs, maximal voltage.
Exactly. I haven't quite figured out why alkalines are called 1.5v and under a load don't keep that voltage and Eneloops are 1.4V off the charger and are called 1.2v which under a light load is mostly depleted. Under no load 3.6V is nowhere near full.

What I find odd is at 3.6v the remaining capacity of 18650s range from 2% to 33% depending on the battery. The 33% left is a panasonic 3400 18650 battery. I would think that the number would be what is left at 50% which would be more like 3.7 to 3.8V. In other words nominal voltages doesn't add up as these voltage/percentages are with no load on the batteries. The 4.1V voltage is over 90% full, and falls in line with 20V as it is about 20.5V no load vs 18V no load at 33% or less. If you measure the 18V packs they would measure 20.5V or so fully charged. Under a load the voltages drop even more which means perhaps nominal should be more like 16V.
 

raggie33

*the raggedier*
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btw i used one of the first cordless drills back when i did hvac work in my teens it was a makita and if i recall it was 7.2 volts i loved it and showed it off lol .
 

vicv

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Think of nominal voltage as the average voltage over the length of the runtime under average conditions. Not the depleted voltage. And that’s voltage under load.
The nominal voltage of alkalines are based on a very low load. A hundred ma or so
 

orbital

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+

For any casual readers out there..

my Milwaukee M18 battery {CP3.0} measured 20.81V
 

louie

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I only hope my DeWalt liIon packs hold up for a while. Few things as annoying as pulling out the drill after a few months to find the battery packs are all dead and the manufacturer no longer makes them.
 

Lynx_Arc

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I only hope my DeWalt liIon packs hold up for a while. Few things as annoying as pulling out the drill after a few months to find the battery packs are all dead and the manufacturer no longer makes them.
If they are 20V or 12V or 60V they will likely be around for a long time and they use quality cells so you should get many years. I've used my PC and B&D tools for the last 5 years and I bought the tools and batteries used and so far only 1 battery has issues and it was weak to begin with the others work pretty well but I'm sure they have lost some capacity. One word of advice is when you check the batteries and they are on 1 bar swap them out if you can instead of running them down to 1 flashing bar. I always recharge mine after use if them drop one bar as you don't know if it has only about 35% left or 67% left with 3 bars.
 

ven

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Yes a weird one with voltages , as we all know dewalt is 18v and 54v for flexvolt, US is 20v and 60v. Marketing or rules /regs or what ever reasons (probably EU regs) that are same.

Well gone and done it 🤦🏻‍♂️ Last Milwaukee m12 for a while, trying the hydraulic impact out. Although it’s 50nm ish, is performs a a little slower on coaching screws that you would use 20v tools for anyway. But the regular impact 150nm might be 8s, the 50nm 10s . But much quieter, however more vibrations (on those application anyway, which are not right for m12). More to see if can cope above what they are meant for.
So now 3/8 impact
3/8 ratchet 75nm
1/4 50nm with hydraulic.
Less power is better for my work uses and 50nm is a lot anyway on 1/4 drive .
My 18v impact DW 1/4” drive is 205nm on mode 3 and a beast! Can snap the Milwaukee adapters to 1/2” if hard on it! Now and then I use mode 2 which is 150nm, but the mostly on mode 1 which is around 6-8nm. Perfect for m6 bolts! This Milwaukee will go into my other tool bag for smaller jobs . All fun and will see next week how it performs.
 

Lynx_Arc

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Yes a weird one with voltages , as we all know dewalt is 18v and 54v for flexvolt, US is 20v and 60v. Marketing or rules /regs or what ever reasons (probably EU regs) that are same.

Well gone and done it 🤦🏻‍♂️ Last Milwaukee m12 for a while, trying the hydraulic impact out. Although it’s 50nm ish, is performs a a little slower on coaching screws that you would use 20v tools for anyway. But the regular impact 150nm might be 8s, the 50nm 10s . But much quieter, however more vibrations (on those application anyway, which are not right for m12). More to see if can cope above what they are meant for.
So now 3/8 impact
3/8 ratchet 75nm
1/4 50nm with hydraulic.
Less power is better for my work uses and 50nm is a lot anyway on 1/4 drive .
My 18v impact DW 1/4” drive is 205nm on mode 3 and a beast! Can snap the Milwaukee adapters to 1/2” if hard on it! Now and then I use mode 2 which is 150nm, but the mostly on mode 1 which is around 6-8nm. Perfect for m6 bolts! This Milwaukee will go into my other tool bag for smaller jobs . All fun and will see next week how it performs.
It is insane how often DW and MW and a half dozen other cordless tool makers come out with new models of the same tool these days. I have a DW impact that has a slide selector with 3 positions probably the same model as yours and now tool makers and going from the slider to push button electronics with other features like auto stop to not overtighten bolts/screws or something of that nature. I'm not entirely sold on push button switches on rough service tools as I've dropped some of mine even breaking the case of my PC impact, luckily I found a brand new replacement shell/case for under $20 and replaced it but months later dropped it again and cracked it in the same place but luckily not broke it.

If you need very light power maybe consider a 1/4 drive bit holder for your drill and you can set the clutch to limit the torque and set it on speed 1. I did this before there was impacts available for taking apart electronics with plastic cases to prevent stripping when putting screws back in. Before there were drills with clutches and screw tips I would buy a cheap phillips screwdriver and saw off the handle and stick that in a drill.
 
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bykfixer

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In my line of work we use precise amounts of tension and power tools are only for saving labor. Bolts are fastened to tens of thousands of pounds of pressure, yet over tightening can lead to stretched bolts, which can result in less tension clampage between the two items fastened together. And wax is used to lubricate bolts with predictable results. It has been proven over the decades that fastening dry bolts or using more slippery lubes results in unpredictable tensions between objects.

One example is fastening 2" (50mm) bolts that are 72" (nearly 2m) long embedded in concrete. A traffic signal pole is fastened to the bolt(s) using a cordless tool to get the initial "snug" of about 180 foot pounds. Then a special tool is used to achieve the 25,550 foot pounds of torgue required. The tool has to be calibrated each time it is used and then a dial torque wrench (also calibrated each time used) is used to confirm the torgue. The tension achieved is in the millions of pounds to ensure wind forces from a hurricane do not cause failure of the bolts.

Bridges on the other hand are similar but use hundreds to thousands of bolts tensioned to specific criteria. Guardrail is designed to act as a rubber band effect to corral a vehicle that hits it with predictable forces. Bolts play a large part in that. So again, in both cases the cordless tool is used to snug them and torque wrench used to ensure accurate tensions.

Breaker bars are usually required to break the bolts loose then removed via cordless tools. A volt or two does not really matter. It's run time that matters more than anything. And I see mostly Millwalkee tools used by the industry. Probably because they cost a little less than Dewalt.

I often see Dewalt used by the mechanics who keep the giant Tonka toys running though.
 

idleprocess

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And I see mostly Millwalkee tools used by the industry.
I often see Dewalt used by the mechanics who keep the giant Tonka toys running though.
In my even more informal survey of industry, Milwaukee seems to have a better following as well. I imagine this has something to do with the dizzying array of specialized tools they make that you're not going to find on the shelves of a home improvement center.

DeWalt seems aimed more at the prosumer market.
 

ven

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In my line of work we use precise amounts of tension and power tools are only for saving labor. Bolts are fastened to tens of thousands of pounds of pressure, yet over tightening can lead to stretched bolts, which can result in less tension clampage between the two items fastened together. And wax is used to lubricate bolts with predictable results. It has been proven over the decades that fastening dry bolts or using more slippery lubes results in unpredictable tensions between objects.

One example is fastening 2" (50mm) bolts that are 72" (nearly 2m) long embedded in concrete. A traffic signal pole is fastened to the bolt(s) using a cordless tool to get the initial "snug" of about 180 foot pounds. Then a special tool is used to achieve the 25,550 foot pounds of torgue required. The tool has to be calibrated each time it is used and then a dial torque wrench (also calibrated each time used) is used to confirm the torgue. The tension achieved is in the millions of pounds to ensure wind forces from a hurricane do not cause failure of the bolts.

Bridges on the other hand are similar but use hundreds to thousands of bolts tensioned to specific criteria. Guardrail is designed to act as a rubber band effect to corral a vehicle that hits it with predictable forces. Bolts play a large part in that. So again, in both cases the cordless tool is used to snug them and torque wrench used to ensure accurate tensions.

Breaker bars are usually required to break the bolts loose then removed via cordless tools. A volt or two does not really matter. It's run time that matters more than anything. And I see mostly Millwalkee tools used by the industry. Probably because they cost a little less than Dewalt.

I often see Dewalt used by the mechanics who keep the giant Tonka toys running though.
Very interesting as always, find it fascinating with bridges/roads as I’m totally ignorant to all the details.
Uk side, Milwaukee in general is more expensive than dewalt or use to be. We don’t seem to have as much choice either and behind the times !
 

Limit_hex

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Changed a door hinge today using this :)

0BD1CDD9-4267-4A5B-B8B6-35239E940630.jpeg
 

ven

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Well the Milwaukee m12 is due in today, couple of the knipex adjustable spanners, so impaktor bit set as well(already use pb tools for the DW). That’s me done again for a while tools wise. No more Milwaukee or DW as more than enough. But I am enjoying the m12. Should have got a pic yesterday of the 3/8 impact. I really recommend this tiny gun. So compact and powerful enough for most general applications.
If I think on , will get some pics over week of the tools doing their thing. Maybe next week to depending if and what I’m doing. The 1/4 Milwaukee is coming to home addy, so that will be at least Wednesday for a work pic at least. Have a good day all👊🏻
 

ven

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t6tRUeg.jpg
Liking this m12 surge, not used much on job but tried out a little. By no means can I come to a verdict yet. Very smooth but I did notice when impacting for any duration, quite a bit of vibration. Could be down to size and I’m not a huge fan of Milwaukee handles/ grips. The 3/8 ratchet is huge , the drivers are not over grippy and not as soft as dewalts. Also a hefty little thing, yes small and compact, but it can’t be any or much different to say the 18v impact (none hydraulic).
5YJPrjx.jpg


Home with rest, no plans to add any more 😀

ZTneZUI.jpg


Will see in a few months time, but for any jobs where I would be impacting away for long durations, dewalt for comfort wins straight away . Power or higher torque all good and well(often YouTube tests with coach bolts) but the most important factor is often overlooked…..comfort! So handle, grip, weight and vibration . Having X nm is great, but if can’t hold it properly …..well not much use. Hanging a door or taking a few parts off doesn’t matter so much. But say putting scaffold up or doing any larger jobs, I would rather have comfort /grip than an extra 50nm or so.
 

ven

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Used the 3/8 Milwaukee today with 17mm impact long socket. Such a nice tiny impact to use, could be a fav down the line. So between dewalt and Milwaukee , I have 3x 1/4 drives (a dewalt at home to ), 3/8 impact and 3/8 ratchet, 1/2” impact. 2 dewalt drills. Mix and match 😀
Got my 2 nice knipex adjustable wrenches today as well. Will get a pic tomorrow. Few little odds n sods (impact bits ) on way and done!
 

ven

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xT5Vtoh.jpg
Oh and as a work light, defo recommend the Milwaukee one. 200lm so one level of flood, but beautiful colour temp/tint edge. Sure nichia but regardless it’s really nice and of course useful. Well priced to, so should be cheap as chips in US. Easy to take apart and even mod.
Bonus keep compact (well within reason ) with 2ah , or throw 6a battery on for extra work time.
Handy hook to that locks/unlocks in place.
New bag since this pic
 
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