Cordless power tools

Poppy

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You never need more than one layer, but sometimes more than one course. Some people go full overkill and do the whole roof with it, but double course at the most is generally all that's needed. Ice and water shield has been around for a pretty long time now and is a big help in stopping ice dam caused water incursion.
You misread my post.
Two rows, vs to courses... its the same. I agree you don't need two layers, it's pretty heavy stuff.
 

Poppy

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I thought about someone saying bilge or sump pump.
They are not subjected to the same corrosive salts, massive temperature swings, or freezing in place, creating a giant hassle if power loss.
..or a short and someone walks in it.
Stringing an extension cord to the front of my garage in winter for a 500W heating element in a drain is just not for me.

If I can keep the snow almost entirely clear, ice has a much harder time starting from the inevitable melt/runoff.

add: my garage is about 25 yards away, uphill from the house..only the back of it is visible from the house
If heat tape is not for you, its not for you.

All outside outlets should be connected to a ground-fault breaker. There are also extension cords that have ground-fault protection.

Many homes around here run more than 75 yards of Christmas lights around their houses at that time of year. Many, like mine have fan powered blow-up ornaments for halloween, and or Christmas.

Just sayin,

Poppy
 

kaichu dento

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You misread my post.
Two rows, vs to courses... its the same. I agree you don't need two layers, it's pretty heavy stuff.
No, you mis-posted and said two layers, which I understood to be a mistake and that you'd meant two courses, which was most of the gist of my post. Grace Ice & Water Shield is great stuff.

Being worried about electricity to the roof which could save all the hassle you went through, though somewhat understandable, is an ungrounded concern. I've been around those systems for decades and never seen an issue yet.
 

orbital

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While back, mentioned I picked up a Metabo (Hitachi) 36V Impact Wrench, got a couple batteries,, really nice power tool batteries I must say.
Anyway, since I had the batteries, ran across a 36V brushless circular saw that's said to truly have the power of an AC plug in unit.

Got it absolutely brand new for $99 shipped, how could I pass on that (y)


> this: https://www.metabo-hpt.com/us/main-...rushless-7-1-4-in-circular-saw-tool-body-only
 

kaichu dento

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...ran across a 36V brushless circular saw that's said to truly have the power of an AC plug in unit.
After using the Makita 36v version worm drive last year and having not only day-long battery capacity, but plugged-in torque too. Not sure if I'll sell off my corded worm drives, one DeWalt and two Makitas, but I haven't used them in quite a while now.
Didn't cut any more than 7-8 2x10's today, but the battery meter still reads full charge right now and after all the usage I got out of a few of these that I was using last year, I'm finally in the not-intrerested-in-corded-saws-anymore category.
 

orbital

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After using the Makita 36v version worm drive last year and having not only day-long battery capacity, but plugged-in torque too. Not sure if I'll sell off my corded worm drives, one DeWalt and two Makitas, but I haven't used them in quite a while now.
Didn't cut any more than 7-8 2x10's today, but the battery meter still reads full charge right now and after all the usage I got out of a few of these that I was using last year, I'm finally in the not-intrerested-in-corded-saws-anymore category.
+

Thanks for the overall endorsement,, actually got mine in early January, been meaning to mention it.
 
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After considering where I'd be utilizing the sander, the price, and the weight, purchasing a corded one was a no-brainer.

Some more 40-year-old Teak window trim midway through being refinished -
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Corded!? I know. I know. I'll show myself to the door.
 

kaichu dento

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Right? The unlimited supply of lighter power is hard to beat.
Finally going cordless with my worm drive was really unexpected, but they're all heavy to begin with and I don't notice it feeling any heavier than than my corded ones, so all my corded saws are going away.
Still haven't tried a cordless orbital yet and am actually holding out hope that possibly with a 4-5 amp battery that maybe I'll change over with them too, but the nailer is a whole different story. Pneumatic nailers are so light, and nailing is instantaneous, but my DeWalt framing nailer is heavy, and slow enough that doing overhead and frontal nailing feels more like a gym workout than it should.
 

bykfixer

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King of the hill.

It was dilapidated when I bought the house about 14 years ago. But one windy day the rolled roof shingles blew off. I said as long as it keeps my mower dry it'll stay. The siding kept getting holes in it on the rear and one day my mower was wet. So I set about taking it apart. The walls were covered with peg board. I started removing the peg board for the next building.

After 3 walls were finished I noticed it started to lean.
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The front wall began to fall off.
Then one night while I slept it fell over. Tralfaz might have helped. He did knock off that front brace one day while playing fetch. But before that day a guy asked if I wanted help knocking it down. He was the guy with the truck and battery powered skil saw. We cut it up in about 4 hours and he hauled it to a place having a bon fire that night.
 

bykfixer

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Going to try out the Ryobi 40 volt trimmer this year.
I can hook a snow thrower, pole saw, rotor tiller and other stuff to it.

I've been using an 18volt with a swivel head to lock in at a right angle for a fabulous edger but the 1 string as a trimmer left a lot to be desired. The twin string 40 volt number really does well at trimming the tough stuff. Variable trigger makes it easy to kick in turbo mode for thick stuff. But I would not reccomend it for daily, extended uses because it's not real durable compared those gasoline powered comercial numbers.

Like any trimmer, the string matters. The 0.80 it came with is plenty durable in grass or along a sidewalk, but for fences and edging I don't have high hopes. It can use up to 0.95 so my "good" string will fit. I ran it for 15 minutes at 4 bars and still had 4 when done. The real test will be at another yard I help with where it doesn't get trimmed very often. That'll be the true test as it takes over an hour using a high torque gasoline powered number. But after using this one for 15 minutes I had enough confidence in it to give away my gasoline powered Stihl to my brother.

BTW the photo is backward so robots won't use it on their search engines hits.
 
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Poppy

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@bykfixer, I'm sure you'll be pleased with your new Ryobi purchase. I also have a number of Ryobi tools, and have been satisfied with them. Last year I bought a Greenworks 40V string trimmer, and a year later, I can report that I am happy that I bought it. It is so much more convenient than having to pull out an electric cord, and drag it around. The only complaint I have about the greenworks unit is that the battery fits in so tightly that it is challenging to remove it for charging.

This weekend I replaced the sway bar end links in my daughter's car. An impact hammer tool is the tool of choice. My son has an Ingersoll rand air impact gun, without a compressor, I have a compressor, without an air gun. When he moved out he took his tools, and many of mine with him. I should have grabbed his air gun last time I was at his house, but failed to do so.

So now I had to make a decision:
1. wait until I am at his house, to get his air gun, he's 40 minutes away
2. buy my own air gun
3. buy an electric impact hammer
4. buy a battery powered impact hammer.

Considering that it is a tool that I VERY RARELY use, and considering the cost difference, I went with a corded unit with a mid level amount of torque.
 

bykfixer

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Typically my 18 volt single string trimmer used as an edger is good enough for about 90% of my yard trimming needs. I use salt water along places I don't want grass to grow like fences or around the shed. But lots of rain recently had things jumping and bermuda grasses had begun to grow around the perimeter. That and the grasses were growing like crazy in the summer heat due to being deeply watered recently.

I got out the 40 volt trimmer and commenced to edging along the house, fence etc and found it to be just as good as my gas powered stuff from before once I got the hang of how much "zing" to throttle it at. I cut corners and rounded areas hard to reach with a mower with ease. With the exception of some patches of fine fescue it cut all grasses with ease. I think a different (thicker) string with tackle that better.

Anyway, after an hour the battery was 3/4 charged still. I even trimmed horizontal along sidewalks so that the vertical edger work would go faster.

The motor is fairly quiet but gets warm, in 95+ degree heat it wasn't too bad but it did get warm so I'd say a steady run in a ditch or that sort of thing is not a good idea. A few minutes here, a few minutes there for an hour or two is probably fine, for the typical home. One needs to take breaks to straighten out their arms and fingers from time to time anyway. But for comercial use? Nah. Probably not suited for that.

IMG_9715.jpeg

The 18 volt as a trimmer

IMG_9716.jpeg

Step on the pedal and twist to become an edger
 
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