Automotive Denali fog/driving/hybrid lights

och

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Sep 15, 2011
Messages
110
Correct, BMW R1200GS Adventure. The S4's can also double up as DRL's at a much reduced output.

Thats right, and they even sell a control module to control the brightness for those without CANBUS. But I bit the bullet and got the D3s, as they are more functional for my purpose.
 

John_Galt

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 20, 2009
Messages
1,762
Location
SW, PA
I had been interested, mildly, in the D3 as a driving light, as a new competitor to the DD SS3 pod lamps (a pair of which I already own and use). Like the morimoto "4banger," it has 3 emitters but each optic appear to be larger in size than the ones employed by DD in the SS1/2/3/5 lineup, which could lead to similar performance. But they appear to not be ready to ship them out yet (happy to take your money, though)
 

och

Newly Enlightened
Joined
Sep 15, 2011
Messages
110
I had been interested, mildly, in the D3 as a driving light, as a new competitor to the DD SS3 pod lamps (a pair of which I already own and use). Like the morimoto "4banger," it has 3 emitters but each optic appear to be larger in size than the ones employed by DD in the SS1/2/3/5 lineup, which could lead to similar performance. But they appear to not be ready to ship them out yet (happy to take your money, though)


Supply chain issues. Are you getting them with fog beam or spot/hybrid beam? Either way they come with clear, yellow, and amber lenses - I chose yellow because I think it looks awesome, I always loved yellow fog lights on 80ies and 90ies cars.
 

John_Galt

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
Feb 20, 2009
Messages
1,762
Location
SW, PA
I was looking at the selective yellow D3's in their spot lenses, as it does not appear the "combo" lenses would be a good choice. I already have sufficient foreground lighting, it's distance/reach that is the issue. I'm very happy with my Ss3 fogs, which remain off most of the time. I also like them with the driving light lens, which I also have, but was looking at these D3's just to try something different. I'm aware that the selective yellow (although given the high color temp of the LED they use, and the relatively light "straw yellow" optic color I'm thinking this may baaaarely qualify as selective yellow) is not a legal aux.high beam/driving light color, but it's much easier on the eyes when you have roads littered with reflective signage every 13 feet.
 
  • Like
Reactions: och

-Virgil-

Flashaholic
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
7,802
Are there any particular numbers an end consumer/user like me should look out for? Obviously a lamp or bulb can be bad regardless of which number is after the "E" mark because the regulations themselves allow too much variance, but assuming the type approval is legit, is a lamp or bulb with a say, "E1" mark more likely to have been vetted than a lamp or bulb with an "E11" or "E13" or "E24" mark?

Officially, legally, all the marks are equivalent. But it's sort of an open secret that Germany (E1), France (E2), Sweden (E5) run no-nonsense type approval authorities. In all the years I've been doing this, don't think I have ever seen a bullѕhit lamp or bulb with any of those marks. The makers/sellers of cruddy lights don't even bother trying; they know they'll flunk. Austria (E12), Japan (E43), Norway (E16), and Finland (E17) probably also go on that same list.

Next "tier" would be ones like the UK (E11) and the Netherlands (E4): some amount of ticky-tacky gets these markings.

Then comes Belgium (E6), Hungary (E7), Spain (E9), Luxembourg (E13): one of these E-stamps doesn't necessarily mean it's a crappy lamp, but their standards and scruples aren't as high; they're known as an easier pass, so a lot of iffy (or worse) parts get tested through those countries' TAAs.

This isn't an exhaustive list, and it's not absolute. Just change the definition of "bullѕhit lamp" to shake up the list. Example: Germany's TAA did a nice favor for BMW and approved its adaptive HID motorcycle headlamp despite there being no textual basis for it. In effect it was an illegal homologation done to boost the "home team" (German industry). They did exactly the same thing with Audi's sequential turn signals: no textual basis in the regulations to allow that setup, but they approved it anyway. This, of course, put all other countries' industries at a disadvantage, because their home TAAs were following the regs. Of course, a French or Italian or Dutch or Japanese or (whatever nationality) company could always submit their component or vehicle for approval by Germany's TAA, which could then either approve it (and accept the money, they win) or fail it (and accept the money, they win).
 

-Virgil-

Flashaholic
Joined
Mar 26, 2004
Messages
7,802
Simple answer is to probably buy from know manufacturers to avoid fake units. The E1 code refers to Germany so the likes of Hella or Bosch etc will be a safe bet.
This isn't how it works...like, not at all. In the first place, Bosch phased out of the vehicle lighting business 25 years ago when they formed Automotive Lighting cooperatively with Magneti Marelli, then eventually sold off their interest to Marelli. Secondly, Bosch (and AL) and Hella and all the rest of the first-line names don't necessarily guarantee a good lamp. All those companies have made stinkers. Granted, most of their stuff is good, but not all of it. Also, there is no hard link between the E-number and the nationality of where the part was made or what company made it. Anyone is free to submit their component or vehicle to any participating country's TAA, and if an approval is granted, that vehicle or component becomes legal for sale and use in any/every participating country.
 
Top