Disaster Ready

Poppy

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Re: disaster ready

scout24, there aren't any ethanol free stations near me. I wonder if high test stores better than 89 octane, and if it is worth the difference.

Which gas stores better? Winter or summer gas?
 

turbodog

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Re: disaster ready

scout24, there aren't any ethanol free stations near me. I wonder if high test stores better than 89 octane, and if it is worth the difference.

Which gas stores better? Winter or summer gas?

Winter is more volatile... which would evaporate easier.

My experience is that quality gas cans, tightly sealed, and stored well do fine for long periods of time. All my cans are either 1) the original rubbermaid or 2) eagle cans.

The rubbermaid cans are holding tough, but I buy aftermarket spouts as rubbermaid doesn't sell the old flex-spouts anymore.

The eagle cans are where I will eventually end up. They are still made in the original design... and are explosion proof.
 

Lynx_Arc

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Re: disaster ready

Poppy- See if there's a fuel station nearby that sells ethanol free gas. It'll be about the same price as premium, but stores a LOT longer without noticeable degradation. I routinely use it 12-18 months after purchase with no ill effects. No stabilizer, just the straight fuel. And you're right, it may be prudent to have a few full cans put aside. I called to have my two propane tanks here at the house topped off this week, the young lady on the phone must have thought I was crazy.
I've used real gas 3 years later with no issues whatsoever in mowers and weedeaters. I never put stabilizer in my gas and my Toro mower starts up second or third pull every spring for the first time and thereafter mostly the first pull the rest of the season.
 

orbital

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Re: disaster ready

You're missing the point. Badly-handed lipo packs spontaneously decompose/disassemble into violent fireballs. Lead-acid batteries simply lose lifespan.

+

Sorry. No they don't.
I use LiPo cells for alot of things daily, they don't just spontaneously explode. Honestly that's a laugh.
Not sure how many LiPo packs I have (many) & again use daily, I'v never had a problem,,, ever.

If I pushed you on the LiPo packs you own or your charger(s),, maybe, you would go to an rc forum to get an answer.
,. if not, enjoy them & stop being afraid of them.



The fact LiPo cells have a balance leads makes them safer than other packs that could have suspect voltage balance.
 

orbital

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Re: disaster ready

+

Lithium Polymer batteries:

Several years ago I made a DC powered LED light bar setup for my snowblower. Really clean 'factory' lookin build.
Made a waterproof enclosure for two 3-cell lithium polymer batteries in series.

After snowblowing one time in 2018, I decided to leave the batteries in their little waterproof enclosure, just disconnecting the positive lead.

Somehow they made contact and lit the light-bar (high'ish amp draw) and fully overdischarged my two cells.
this was a user error on my part, never to be repeated.

anyway, I revived the two cells the next day & still use them daily today, without issue.

Lithium Polymer batteries are in more & more things for good reason, they have excellent performance.
Absolutely, they could power an 'emergency use' inverter in your car, without question.

___________
 

turbodog

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Re: disaster ready

+

... I'v never had a problem,,, ever.

... you would go to an rc forum to get an answer.
,. if not, enjoy them & stop being afraid of them.



The fact LiPo cells have a balance leads makes them safer than other packs that could have suspect voltage balance.

I'm gonna come down hard on you due to some falsehoods that, if followed, will eventually result in life/property damage.


Means literally nothing that one person has gotten lucky with lipo packs for a period of time. Good for you. Hope your luck holds out.

If I want legitimate info, I will go to the mfg. And all mfgs are saying the same thing:
Do NOT overdischarge.
If overdischarged, recharging will eventually result in a fire.
Lipo packs are to be given the utmost respect.
Etc.
Read for yourself. https://power.tenergy.com/lipo-safety-warnings/

Lipos have a balance lead BECAUSE they are intrinsically dangerous. I don't read stories about nicd/nimh/lead-acid burning down houses.

There is a difference between afraid and respectful.

Additionally... to recommend something 1) dangerous and 2) not endorsed by the battery mfg on a public forum is opening yourself up for a nice fat lawsuit when someone gets hurt.
 

orbital

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Re: disaster ready

+

turbodog, I actually own Lithium Polymer batteries & have used them daily for the last 8 1/2 years, you do not.

The discussion ends there.

::side note, bought a high end notebook a couple years ago for emergency backup,
the charger for the notebooks' Lithium Polymer Battery in it is 19.5V @ 11.8A = battery performance

============================================================

Disaster ready is not only a plan, but the willingness to try different things & think outside the box.
Being able to troubleshooting & make whatever you need.

One thing that concerns me the most are people easily told what to think.
 

idleprocess

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Re: disaster ready

Can we generally agree upon the original point?
Badly-handed lipo packs spontaneously decompose/disassemble into violent fireballs.
Lipo batteries lack the more robust mechanical construction of the cylindrical cells common to flashlights, thus must be physically handled with greater care. Similar to li-ion, their charging and discharging regimens must be adhered to; while we've all heard of deep-discharged li* cells coming back from the dead, doing so is a risk unlike NiMH/NiCd/PbA.

Most inverters do indeed cut out at a given voltage so as to avoid over-discharging their source. It's a near-universal feature in even cheap 12V/24V PbA inverters, which while marketed as being a safety feature likely has roots in more mundane component minimum voltage and current limits. No reason that an inverter tuned for li* voltage ranges couldn't be configured to cut out at a safe minimum voltage.
 

turbodog

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Re: disaster ready

Can we generally agree upon the original point?

... No reason that an inverter tuned for li* voltage ranges couldn't be configured to cut out at a safe minimum voltage.

Yes, and a lipo-power inverter is a bit of a moot point. Not enough pack capacity to run much load for a useful time. Which is a not the fault of the chemistry, simply the capacity/size.
 

orbital

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Re: disaster ready

Yes, and a lipo-power inverter is a bit of a moot point. Not enough pack capacity to run much load for a useful time. Which is a not the fault of the chemistry, simply the capacity/size.

+

Yes, it's not a voltage issue or a voltage cut-off issue (since the inverters take care of that) If the inverter cuts off at 10V, a three cell will only be at 3.33V each cell = non issue.
but it's the fact they can be used in an emergency.

A piece of medical equipment, ect...
Runtime is a factor, units should be in parallel & used just for emergency only, but they will work (13Ah or even 16Ah could possibly save someones life)

Thanks for the message turbodog:thumbsup:


 
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idleprocess

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Re: disaster ready

Yes, and a lipo-power inverter is a bit of a moot point. Not enough pack capacity to run much load for a useful time. Which is a not the fault of the chemistry, simply the capacity/size.
Depends on the need.

I had a power outage a couple months ago some ~90 minutes before the end of the work day. First UPS running my monitor + dock died ~30 minutes in. Figuring that the rest were soon to follow I decided to go minimal - powered them all down, undocked the laptop, tethered the laptop to the work phone, broke out the ONE+ 150W peak inverter, connected the phone and laptop to the inverter, then soldiered on for another hour at the cost of ~25% of a 9Ah battery. I could probably go all day if I adjusted power settings on the laptop to save power.
 

orbital

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Re: disaster ready

Depends on the need.

I had a power outage a couple months ago some ~90 minutes before the end of the work day. First UPS running my monitor + dock died ~30 minutes in. Figuring that the rest were soon to follow I decided to go minimal - powered them all down, undocked the laptop, tethered the laptop to the work phone, broke out the ONE+ 150W peak inverter, connected the phone and laptop to the inverter, then soldiered on for another hour at the cost of ~25% of a 9Ah battery. I could probably go all day if I adjusted power settings on the laptop to save power.

+

===============================
<> DIY ultra portable inverter system <>
===============================

Acquired a small 12V Samlex* pure sine inverter, paired with two 3-cell Lithium Polymer battery packs (16Ah in parallel configuration)
To ensure the wattage was a consistent draw, used with two Honeywell air purifiers (72.5W total for both)

~note~ normally store Lithium Polymers batteries between 3.65~3.95V,, this test was done at a modest storage voltage of 3.94V per cell.
Fully charged batteries will obviously give much longer runtime.

Test I: Both air purifiers ran for 85 min.
Inverter Auto-Off was 10.39V or 3.46V per cell
__________________________________________________________
Recharged both battery packs at 8A to 3.94V per cell & ran the test again!
__________________________________________________________

Test II: Both air purifiers ran for 85min.
Inverter Auto-Off was 10.39V or 3.46V per cell

So, average runtime from storage voltage was identical
again, fully charged batteries will give much longer runtime than this.

......Now instead of the air purifiers, picture a piece of medical equipment or an emergency ________.
Some electronics need pure waveform & that's key here.


Finally, have the entire setup in a small waterproof hardcase** (w/ foam interior) for a clean, ultra portable inverter system.

cheers



* https://samlexamerica.com/products/120-watt-pure-sine-wave-inverter-pst-120-12/
** my setup will be in a Nanuk 910 which has extra room for other batteries ect.

~ Including hardcase, approx. 6 pounds total for the system ~
 
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idleprocess

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Re: disaster ready

Suspect I'll be putting said ONE+ inverter to the test tomorrow (or maybe the monolithic 'portable outlet' I have in my work bag) - electrician is threatening to show up and install an interlock and generator inlet.
 

scout24

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Re: disaster ready

Idleprocess- Nothing better than not having to run extention cords. Enjoy, but I hope you never have to use it...
 

idleprocess

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idleprocess,
Do you have an update for us?
Inquiring minds want to know :)

It's been an adventure. On the 22nd of June the electrician did part of the job.
  1. Additional 60A 240V breaker (good)
  2. Additional riser J-box on the outside wall (uhm, OK)
  3. 14-50 outlet atop said J-box beneath an all-weather cover (buh?)
Electrician said they ordered the wrong interlock kit so they had to order another one which would take some time. Did not explain the outlet (suppose I can run my dryer or oven outside - a bit far away from the driveway for any wandering Teslas that happen to packing a destination charger) but I'm assuming it's for code compliance and because some rando somewhere probably closed an infeed breaker at some point without the interlock, licked their finger, then touched an energized prong to experience 240V magic pixies.

Since then I've had semiweekly e-mails with the service manager. First they'd presumably sourced a L14-50P inlet, which is effectively useless because L14-50 cord hardware is unobtanium. Now they're trying to find an alternative (they haven't responded up or down to SS2-50 and CS6364) 120V/240V 30A that 'fits into the box they installed', which is weird since I can find L14-30 inlets easily enough.

I might just DIY the rest of it if they can't find the parts (or possibly the time) soon.
 

Poppy

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Urggh,
Dealing with contractors can be so frustrating!

With the preparedness mindset, you might pick up whatever connectors you might need to make it work, so that you have them "on-hand" incase you need to back feed the out door dryer connection. You obviously know that you need to throw the main before supplying power to the panel.

It would be a heck of a thing to be so close and yet too far to make the connection, should an outage occur.

Thanks for the update... sorry for the problems.
 

idleprocess

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With the preparedness mindset, you might pick up whatever connectors you might need to make it work, so that you have them "on-hand" incase you need to back feed the out door dryer connection. You obviously know that you need to throw the main before supplying power to the panel.
Yeah, I can buy the components for a suicide cord and use it safely-ish by only connecting it before the generators are started and before the infeed breaker is closed and only be out a 14-50 plug whenever the final arrangement is made.

EDIT: Appears that after some prodding the electrician claims to have sourced an inlet and will be scheduling completion Real Soon Now™.
 
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Poppy

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Hurricane Henri is getting ready to hit the NY, NJ, Connecticut tri-state area.

I looked around, and am happy. I cleared my rain gutters, and put the cushions for the chairs away. Started my 3500 watt gennie... all's good!

I have food, water, gasoline, and a generator. I have a back up gennie, and a back up window AC.

It is a good feeling knowing that I don't have to run out to get the basics, just in case. They are already here! :)

I called a friend who is medically power dependent, and who lives in the center of long island, which is going to be hit the hardest. They tested their generator and got gas for it. They feel that they are prepared.

It reminds me of Sub_Umbra's thread... "water epiphany" If you are prepared before-hand, things are a LOT LESS stressful.
 
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