emergencies comms

scout24

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I still do not see your point.
Here is a practice ham test, I do not see how it will address any point you made, such as how to operate a particular unit, where to get local services frequencies, local repeaters codes, how long the info will stay in your head...etc.
Everything you mention has to be learned outside of the ham exam scope, I never said you do not have to learn your unit, and how to use it, that is actually exact opposite of what I said, I actually provided a channel that will teach you all of that, as well as the site where you can learn what frequencies used locally. As you see from practice test NONE of the things you use for your arguments are addressed in the test. But thanks for proving my point, and showing why people do not want to deal with ham community.
Once you're licensed. And in touch with a local club. You learn the in's and out's of local amateur radio usage. When and on what repeaters nets occur. What local simplex frequencies are in use. The three repeaters that aren't listed on line. Who from your club you can reach from your house. Your car. With your walkie talkie. If you cannot see the value in having a network of familiar voices and knowledge of local operations, I've got nothing for you. I'm done here. Enjoy... It almost seems you're angry about amateur radio for some reason, lol.
 

alpg88

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I do see your point, if you make ham your hobby and a lifestyle, However to have a radio just in case of emergency, and know how to use it, you need none of that. that is what OP is asking. yet he is told he needs to make ham radio basically his lifestyle, and become a member of some kinda club, otherwise do not bother,
 

KITROBASKIN

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New Mexico, USA
I might have already made a post like this before . But its good to get your ham license and atleast have a few UV5RS AND Garmin in reach mini sate litte text messanger in your EDC. Coms kit
This is originating post of this thread.

Asking about getting licensed or not was a desire to hear CPF member opinions, not sow discontent.

A former colleague described the advantages of getting a ham license, saying one does not have to memorize the morse code anymore. She demonstrated a radio check (not aware of the ham lingo).

Some of us are just not willing to put in the time for the potential emergency benefit of ham. We have 4 walkies as an option.
 

alpg88

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I can't see how having a license or not has anything to do with memorizing morse code. would love to hear her explanation.
 

PhotonWrangler

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In a handbasket
When I first inquired about ham many years ago, seems learning Morse Code was a requirement back then to get a license.
Yes, this used to be a requirement. It was the simplest, least expensive way to communicate over the air - just an oscillator and a key. You could often whip up a transmitter with parts from a junk box, so if you were in a SHTF situation, it was the easiest way to get a message out with just a little bit of McGuyvering. While this still holds true, Morse Code is mostly an anachronism nowadays and the code requirement was keeping some good technical minds away from the hobby. The FCC eventually recognized this and dropped the code requirement.
 

Monocrom

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Not sure who it was, perhaps County Comm? Used to offer a titanium card the size of a credit card with Morse code printed on it that you could carry with you. Likely something similar can be found online.
 

bykfixer

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John 3:16
Yes, this used to be a requirement. It was the simplest, least expensive way to communicate over the air - just an oscillator and a key. You could often whip up a transmitter with parts from a junk box, so if you were in a SHTF situation, it was the easiest way to get a message out with just a little bit of McGuyvering. While this still holds true, Morse Code is mostly an anachronism nowadays and the code requirement was keeping some good technical minds away from the hobby. The FCC eventually recognized this and dropped the code requirement.
Realizing it was just a tv show, the show Jericho actually showed several things life post appocolypse that could be useful to some who paid attention. It had it's Hollyweird issues too, like somehow the flat screen tv in a local pub still worked, yet it also showed that old cars without computers (ie points on the distributor) still worked, incan 4D Maglite did as well and morse code was used to communicate with the outside world. In the local sheriff's office was an old tube ham radio that was monitored as a way of learning who else had survived.

In the event of the appocolypse I'm riding my bicycle to @scout24's house. 😉
 

Jbraman

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Nov 19, 2016
Messages
124
Well it still takes a bit of knowledge to buy the right kit and set it up. You can't run an Icom by just turning it on. Like it works better at night than during the day and power level matters to. You are probably better off buying a Shortwave and calling it a day.
Absolutely vague and basically false statement. "It works better at night than during the day and power level matters too". I have worked all over the world on 5 watts HF so power doesn't really matter. It also works just fine during the day. It all depends on what band you are working on. Yet certain bands don't work as well in the day and certain don't work as well at night. A little research for you would go a long way.
 

IMA SOL MAN

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The HEART of the USA.
Absolutely vague and basically false statement. "It works better at night than during the day and power level matters too". I have worked all over the world on 5 watts HF so power doesn't really matter. It also works just fine during the day. It all depends on what band you are working on. Yet certain bands don't work as well in the day and certain don't work as well at night. A little research for you would go a long way.
...and then there is the antenna...ooooo, antennas!!! :geek:

200.gif
 

rgcurrey

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Dec 2, 2023
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Pensacola
I guessed the pessimist in me always looked at radios more for hear news coming in and not for communicating out. Yeah, I am one of those who may or may not be preparing for a version of tomorrow that is not as rosy as the version we have today. Anyway, I go back and forth getting my HAM to go along with the Alinco transceiver I purchased. Been thinking about PAM-radio.com as another avenue to familiarize my self more with it and with the CountyComm GP-7 SSB I just bought.
 

Monocrom

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Aug 27, 2006
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NYC
I've decided to focus this year on comms and good night-vision gear. Already have the latter set-up worked out, just waiting to order. Getting a budget set-up (well, "budget" by night-vision and thermal night-vision gear standards). Still working on comms. Have a good set of radios for communication, and just yesterday bought a budget set as back-up. Both models work off of batteries. One uses batts. as a back-up. I figured not having to wait around for radios to charge up in an extended emergency is a good thing. There are some excellent radios out there for urban use with tall buildings in the way. Excellent range, clarity, etc. Unfortunately, you can't just pop in a set of fresh lithium or alkaline batteries if they die on you.
 

letschat7

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Buy a good set of US/Israeli/Russian NVGs. Get Gen 3 or don't even bother. Spend as much as you can to get the best ones you can get your hands on or you will regret it.

Somethings to know, if you use IR and your enemy also has NVGs it gives away your position.

The Russians used to sell an IR device for rifles that was only $500 when the American version was like 1500-2000 or so.

It won't work so well in an urban area. There are a lot of lights and just because your eyes think nothing of these lighst the NVG becomes nearly useless.

RTFM!

Saft makes some batteries so you don't need to use alkaleaks. Don't export one and I think there is a end user cert to buy one.
 

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IMA SOL MAN

Flashlight Enthusiast
Joined
May 18, 2023
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The HEART of the USA.
I've decided to focus this year on comms and good night-vision gear. Already have the latter set-up worked out, just waiting to order. Getting a budget set-up (well, "budget" by night-vision and thermal night-vision gear standards). Still working on comms. Have a good set of radios for communication, and just yesterday bought a budget set as back-up. Both models work off of batteries. One uses batts. as a back-up. I figured not having to wait around for radios to charge up in an extended emergency is a good thing. There are some excellent radios out there for urban use with tall buildings in the way. Excellent range, clarity, etc. Unfortunately, you can't just pop in a set of fresh lithium or alkaline batteries if they die on you.
Some HTs have AA packs as accessories.
 
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